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No Smoking

NEWS
January 25, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philip Morris U.S.A., the nation's largest cigarette manufacturer, and some Los Angeles area restaurants plan to sponsor a November ballot initiative that would abolish local anti-smoking ordinances in California, The Times learned Monday. The initiative, called the California Uniform Tobacco Control Act, would place the responsibility for regulating smoking in the hands of the Legislature, and invalidate smoking bans in Los Angeles and more than 100 other cities and counties.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993
Most of us are quite capable of choosing a restaurant without the need for legislation dictated by the narrow-minded perspective of Councilman Marvin Braude and his no-smoking regime (Restaurant News, Nov. 28, and Letters, Dec. 12). Furthermore, can letter writer Clarence Brauer be taken seriously? He's actually asking the government to ban music in restaurants. This intolerant mind-set is becoming epidemic. The cure is simple, but read slowly anyway: If you don't like the place, go somewhere else.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
Local merchants will work with city officials to draft an ordinance to restrict smoking in public workplaces, according to a plan approved by the City Council. Mayor Ric Loya, Councilman William P. Cunningham, City Atty. Steven N. Skolnik, members of the Chamber of Commerce and other representatives from the business community will form a committee to write the ordinance for council consideration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993
The nonsmokers have again succeeded with their wrath of vengeance. They succeeded by having laws passed that forbid smoking in city, county, state and federal buildings. They had laws passed that forbid smoking on airplanes. They persuaded companies to have no-smoking offices and office buildings. They had laws passed that forbid smoking on airplanes. They pass laws that continuously increase the tax on cigarettes, making us spend more per pack. Now they pass a law forbidding smoking in restaurants (Valley Commentary, Aug. 15)
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Restaurateur Tom Marino will admit, reluctantly, that he benefited from Bellflower's short-lived smoking ban. He discovered that he liked his eatery without the haze of burning tobacco. So, he kept the no-smoking signs at Marino's Italian Restaurant even after Bellflower's law was repealed in May, 1992. But Marino doesn't like the idea of city-imposed restrictions on smoking in restaurants. He didn't like it for Bellflower, and he doesn't think it would be a good idea for Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON
Prompted by no-smoking ordinances in neighboring communities, the Thousand Oaks City Council on Wednesday directed staff to draft a law that would prohibit people from lighting up in public places or at work. Although some members expressed concern that such a ban would drive smokers--and their dollars--out of Thousand Oaks restaurants and shops, the council unanimously voted to hold public hearings on a no-smoking ordinance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Garbed in animal skins, feather skirts and ceremonial headgear, the troupe of seven American Indian dancers banged drums, beat sticks and chanted songs Sunday to get their message across to the audience at Oxnard's Plaza Park. "Tobacco is bad," said Tony Romero, the 71-year-old Chumash leader of the group, summarizing the entire message of El Gran Apagon (the Great Stomp-Out), a smoke-out aimed at minority families and youths held throughout the day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's smoker Gus Palyvos' version of the All-American breakfast: A cup of black coffee and a couple of True cigarettes savored over the morning paper. But the 54-year-old Del Mar racetrack worker got a rude awakening Monday when Jenny, his favorite waitress in his chosen cafe, met him at the door of Marge's Country Kitchen in Solana Beach. "Sorry, Gus," she said. "You can't smoke here from today on. It's the law now."
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | GERALD FARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite children parading with signs and testimony from parents, youngsters and health experts on the threats posed by smoking, the Bellflower City Council has repealed Southern California's toughest no-smoking ordinance 14 months after it took effect. Mayor John Ansdell failed in a last-minute attempt Monday night to require nonsmoking and smoking areas in restaurants.
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