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NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
Federal forecasters have softened their prediction of an extreme storm season, trimming back the number of hurricanes they expect this year to between six and nine. That's a small drop from the seven to 11 hurricanes originally forecast in May, but the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's newer projections still threaten a highly active season. “Our confidence for an above-normal season is still high because the predicted atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are favorable for storm development have materialized,” Gary Bell, NOAA's lead hurricane forecaster, said this week.
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NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Last year was marked by extremes in precipitation around the country, with unusually wet weather east of the Rockies and drought worsening in the West, particularly California, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In its annual State of the Climate report, NOAA said California had its driest year on record in 2013, after receiving only 32.8% of its average annual precipitation. But the drought that extended over 61% of the country in January shrank to only 31% by December.
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SCIENCE
July 5, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Science Now blog
In one of its more head-turning posts, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has announced -- wait for it -- that there is no evidence that mermaids are real. I hope you were sitting down, if you have the legs to do so. If you have a fishtail, you'd better go ahead and pop right out of existence. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this post is why NOAA, a U.S. scientific agency, would want to weigh in on these mythical creatures any more than they'd want to expound on the potential atmospheric perturbations caused by Santa Claus' countless Christmas Eve flights around the globe.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been doing some serious myth-busting after news reports this week claimed a massive island of debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami was headed for the U.S. West Coast. One problem: There is no floating mass of debris. The disaster swept millions of tons of material out to sea. While some has washed up on the West Coast and Hawaii, what remains afloat is widely scattered across the Pacific. The source of alarm was a map NOAA posted online without fanfare Sept.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Last year was the hottest year on record for the contiguous 48 states, marked by near-record numbers of extreme weather events such as drought, wildfire, tornadoes and storms, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In its annual report, State of the Climate, NOAA reported that the average annual temperature was 55.3 degrees - 3.3 degrees greater than the average temperature for the 20th century. It was also a full degree higher than the previous record-high temperature, set in 1998 - the biggest margin between two record-high temperatures to date.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Much of the West continues to struggle with unusually dry conditions, raising the prospect of another year of wildfires, stunted crops and unnavigable stretches of river in various parts of the country, according to a federal assessment. More than two-thirds of the country is under abnormally dry to exceptional drought conditions, "which, although serious, is a slight improvement since fall 2012," said the National Drought Early Warning Outlook. While the report said the drought was over in most of the nation east of the Mississippi River, the portion of the country still facing drought - most of the West and Florida - should expect it "to persist or intensify.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Tornadoes and wildfires. Droughts and hurricanes. The United States saw almost every sort of calamity this year as 11 billion-dollar natural disasters struck the country. Superstorm Sandy hit New York, ruined parts of the New Jersey coast and closed the New York Stock Exchange  for two straight days -- the first time such a shutdown had happened since 1888. The country suffered its worst drought since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. With the year coming to a close, 2012 looks like it won't beat last year for the number of separate billion-dollar disasters that traumatized various parts of the country: 2011 saw 14 massive calamities, a record.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Last year was marked by extremes in precipitation around the country, with unusually wet weather east of the Rockies and drought worsening in the West, particularly California, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In its annual State of the Climate report, NOAA said California had its driest year on record in 2013, after receiving only 32.8% of its average annual precipitation. But the drought that extended over 61% of the country in January shrank to only 31% by December.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2012 | By Mark K. Matthews, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The number of U.S. satellites watching Earth is expected to plummet by 2020, and weather forecasting, including hurricane tracking, could suffer as a result, a new report warns. The study, released last week by the nation's top science advisors, estimated that the fleet of science satellites operated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration would "decline precipitously" from a peak of 110 probes last year to fewer than 30 in 2020. The drop is a result of several factors, including budget problems and rocket accidents, and scientists said the United States risked blurring its vision of Earth if it did not act quickly to replace satellites expected to die during the next eight years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday that the northeastern Pacific Ocean population of great white sharks is not in danger of extinction and does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. NOAA had been researching the health of the great white population since last year, when the environmental groups Oceana, Shark Stewards and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a petition calling for endangered species...
NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
Federal forecasters have softened their prediction of an extreme storm season, trimming back the number of hurricanes they expect this year to between six and nine. That's a small drop from the seven to 11 hurricanes originally forecast in May, but the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's newer projections still threaten a highly active season. “Our confidence for an above-normal season is still high because the predicted atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are favorable for storm development have materialized,” Gary Bell, NOAA's lead hurricane forecaster, said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday that the northeastern Pacific Ocean population of great white sharks is not in danger of extinction and does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. NOAA had been researching the health of the great white population since last year, when the environmental groups Oceana, Shark Stewards and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a petition calling for endangered species...
NATIONAL
May 24, 2013 | Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Unusually warm ocean waters and favorable atmospheric conditions are expected to create an above-average number of tropical storms and hurricanes in the Atlantic and Caribbean this season, national weather forecasters predicted. In its latest outlook, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said there was a strong likelihood of seven to 11 hurricanes - including three to six major hurricanes with winds of at least 111 mph. Forecasters cite the convergence of several factors in May that should generate an above-average number of tropical storms over the next six months.
SCIENCE
April 6, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
When the World Trade Organization found last year that U.S. labeling requirements for dolphin-safe tuna put Mexican tuna fishermen at a trade disadvantage, marine advocates worried that the federal government would weaken its dolphin-safe standards. Instead, a proposed rule published Friday by the National Marine Fisheries Service would expand the certification requirements. In the eastern tropical Pacific -- which roughly extends from San Diego west to Hawaii and south to Peru -- dolphins and large yellowfin tuna swim together in closely packed schools.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Much of the West continues to struggle with unusually dry conditions, raising the prospect of another year of wildfires, stunted crops and unnavigable stretches of river in various parts of the country, according to a federal assessment. More than two-thirds of the country is under abnormally dry to exceptional drought conditions, "which, although serious, is a slight improvement since fall 2012," said the National Drought Early Warning Outlook. While the report said the drought was over in most of the nation east of the Mississippi River, the portion of the country still facing drought - most of the West and Florida - should expect it "to persist or intensify.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Last year was the hottest year on record for the contiguous 48 states, marked by near-record numbers of extreme weather events such as drought, wildfire, tornadoes and storms, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In its annual report, State of the Climate, NOAA reported that the average annual temperature was 55.3 degrees - 3.3 degrees greater than the average temperature for the 20th century. It was also a full degree higher than the previous record-high temperature, set in 1998 - the biggest margin between two record-high temperatures to date.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2010 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
Robert Downs leads the scientists who sniff at fish. Each day, his team of seven sensory experts dip their noses into large Pyrex bowls of snapper, tuna and other raw seafood to test for even a whiff of the pungent oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico. This is not Grand Cru wine. "We use specific terms for the aroma," said Downs, who supervises the seafood smellers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's marine lab here. "Diesel oil. Bunker oil. Asphalt.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | Associated Press
The first half of this year was the warmest six months ever recorded globally and July is likely to set a record as well, federal climate experts said Tuesday. "There is no time in recorded data history that we have seen this sequence of record-setting for six consecutive months," said James Baker, administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He called the findings "remarkable and sobering."
NATIONAL
December 24, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Tornadoes and wildfires. Droughts and hurricanes. The United States saw almost every sort of calamity this year as 11 billion-dollar natural disasters struck the country. Superstorm Sandy hit New York, ruined parts of the New Jersey coast and closed the New York Stock Exchange  for two straight days -- the first time such a shutdown had happened since 1888. The country suffered its worst drought since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. With the year coming to a close, 2012 looks like it won't beat last year for the number of separate billion-dollar disasters that traumatized various parts of the country: 2011 saw 14 massive calamities, a record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Over the last 63 years, they've become experts on the weather in the western San Fernando Valley. So when operators of Pierce College's campus weather station suggested that those attending the unveiling of a major station upgrade bring umbrellas, people paid attention. It turned out to be partly sunny and dry during Thursday morning's ceremonies in Woodland Hills; the first light sprinkles didn't come for another three hours. Nonetheless, meteorology professors had canvas canopies on hand just in case the skies opened up before the speechmaking was over.
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