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Nobel Prize

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Lawrence Klein, the University of Pennsylvania economist who won the 1980 Nobel Prize for his computer-based models that help governments forecast the future and act accordingly, died Sunday at his home in Gladwyne, Pa. He was 93. His family announced his death but did not disclose the cause. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded Klein the 1980 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences "for the creation of econometric models and the application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- A trio of U.S. scholars on Monday won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for their research on the predictability of the price of stocks, bonds and other assets.  Eugene F. Fama and Lars Peter Hansen, both of the University of Chicago, and Robert J. Shiller, of Yale University, will share the $1.2-million prize. "Disbelief, that's the only way to put it," Shiller, co-founder of the Case-Shiller housing price index, said by telephone from New Haven, Conn., describing his reaction to the news in an interview with the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which announced the prize.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Don Lee
The question seems simple, but shedding light on the answer was worth a Nobel Prize for three American economists: How do we know how much an item is worth? Eugene F. Fama and Lars Peter Hansen of the University of Chicago and Robert J. Shiller of Yale University spent decades working on that problem, separately pioneering two competing views on finance that have strongly influenced the way people save and invest as well as major issues in public policy. Fama, 74, spent a five-decade career in Chicago demonstrating how well free markets can determine the value of stocks, bonds and other assets.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
If the Nobel Peace Prize were awarded to the most inspiring triumph of reason over brutality, 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai would be booking a flight to Oslo. The Pakistani schoolgirl's activism for education and equality in defiance of Taliban bullets made her a favorite for Friday's prestigious award. That the Nobel committee decided instead to recognize the work of enforcers of the 1997 Chemical Weapons Convention disappointed legions of Malala admirers worldwide but failed to shake their belief that she was the most deserving.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - The head of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, said the honor would provide a welcome boost to the group's aim of ridding the world of chemical arms. Ahmet Uzumcu, the OPCW's director-general, also expressed hope that the award could help bring an end to the deadly civil war in Syria, where his organization's inspectors are trying to destroy the government's arsenal of chemical weapons even as fighting rages.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Hardly anyone knew it existed before last month. Its work has been criticized and its employees shot at. Bigger names, including that of a teenage girl, were thought to be ahead in line for the world's most prestigious award. But the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the watchdog group now at the forefront of the effort to divest Syria of its chemical arsenal, was declared the recipient Friday of the Nobel Peace Prize. It was the second year in a row that the prize committee decided to honor an institution and not a person, following last year's choice of the European Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani teenager and outspoken proponent of the right of girls and young women to be educated, survived being shot in the head by Taliban gunmen in 2012. But as if attempted murder wasn't bad enough -- now the Taliban is proving to be a bad sport too. Malala survived a bullet to the head, penned a book about her experiences with Christina Lamb -- "I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban" was published by Little, Brown this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When the Nobel Prize in Literature was announced Thursday morning, literary Twitter flowed in three general veins: congratulations for the much-admired Alice Munro, the new Nobel laureate; wry commentary on how the prize is talked about in Western media outlets; and warm jokes, including the inevitable twerking. The applause came from many quarters: Bestselling novelist @jodipicoult : Love, love, LOVE that #AliceMunro won the #Nobel. Booker Prize-winning novelist @SalmanRushdie : Many congrats to Alice Munro.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- This year's Nobel Prize in chemistry struck a bittersweet chord in Israel -- a mix of pride for home-grown achievement and concern for the future of the nation's higher education and scientific research. Two of the three laureates for the prize announced Wednesday, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel, conducted a considerable part of their research in Israel's leading scientific institutes. But by the time they gained Nobel recognition , they had long since shifted most of their work to the U.S. despite strong family ties in Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Alice Munro was nowhere to be found on Thursday morning when the Swedish Academy awarded her the Nobel Prize in literature. The permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy, Peter Englund, had to leave her a voice mail. The short story writer surfaced briefly for a quick interview with the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., and then dropped out of sight. This is utterly in character, for Munro has never sought the spotlight during her remarkable career. The author of 14 books of fiction, she's well-known to readers around the globe and a perennial Nobel contender for the acuity of her vision, the precision of her voice.
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