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Noboru Watanabe

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After spending 10 straight days on the golf course, Noboru Watanabe was looking tanned and relaxed at a party at the Beverly Hills Four Seasons Hotel given recently by his new business partners, Frank G. Hathaway and Charles F. Hathaway. The affair culminated a string of receptions to welcome Watanabe, whose Marukin Shoji company now owns a 49% interest in the landmark Riviera Country Club & Riviera Tennis Club.
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NEWS
May 2, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shadow looms behind the tranquillity of the Riviera Country Club, the historic golf course that sprawls across a verdant bluff overlooking the ocean in Pacific Palisades: The club's Japanese owners are suspected of laundering money tainted by corruption back home. U.S.
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NEWS
May 2, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shadow looms behind the tranquillity of the Riviera Country Club, the historic golf course that sprawls across a verdant bluff overlooking the ocean in Pacific Palisades: The club's Japanese owners are suspected of laundering money tainted by corruption back home. U.S.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After spending 10 straight days on the golf course, Noboru Watanabe was looking tanned and relaxed at a party at the Beverly Hills Four Seasons Hotel given recently by his new business partners, Frank G. Hathaway and Charles F. Hathaway. The affair culminated a string of receptions to welcome Watanabe, whose Marukin Shoji company now owns a 49% interest in the landmark Riviera Country Club & Riviera Tennis Club.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After months of secrecy, Marukin Shoji Ltd., a Japanese real estate company, emerged Friday as the mysterious investor in the Riviera Country Club, the landmark 168-acre golf and tennis resort in Pacific Palisades. Noboru Watanabe, chairman of Marukin USA, signed a formal agreement to pay, as previously disclosed, $52.9 million for a 49% interest in Riviera Associates, a new partnership formed with Laaco Ltd., the club's current owner. Laaco will retain the majority stake in the new partnership.
SPORTS
November 27, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON
The members of Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades overwhelmingly favor the club staging the 1995 PGA Championship, according to a telephone survey by the club's management. Bill Masse, Riviera's general manager, said Tuesday that he will recommend to owner Noboru Watanabe that the club proceed with plans to hold the event, one of four major tournaments on the PGA Tour. "The results are very gratifying," Masse said.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | BEA MAXWELL
Los Angeles Junior Chamber of Commerce Champions Foundation has passed along a $117,500 donation from Noboru Watanabe, president of the Riviera Country Club, to three nonprofit organizations: L.A.'
SPORTS
September 8, 1989 | Jim Murray
The first time Noboru Watanabe played Riviera Country Club, he knew he had to belong. The initiation was reasonable--$108 million. But of course, that included carts and green fees. That's probably the most money ever paid to join a golf club but golfer Watanabe not only joined it, he bought it. The repercussions were seismic. The buyout evoked the typical responses to Japanese investment in America: "Who won the war, anyway?" "What's next, the White House?"
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was bad enough that unfamiliar Japanese investors bought the posh Riviera Country Club--an exclusive Pacific Palisades establishment steeped in traditions dating back to the Golden Era of Hollywood. But then came the announcement two months ago that the new owners would banish motorized carts from the sublime fairways of the Riviera's world-class golf course, requiring that they stay on paths.
SPORTS
November 26, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a seeming effort to appease its membership, Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades is reevaluating its decision to play host to the 1995 PGA Championship. A final decision is expected today. The Professional Golfers' Assn. announced in August that Riviera management signed a letter of intent to hold the event, which is considered by some to be the least prestigious of the four major golf tournaments.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After months of secrecy, Marukin Shoji Ltd., a Japanese real estate company, emerged Friday as the mysterious investor in the Riviera Country Club, the landmark 168-acre golf and tennis resort in Pacific Palisades. Noboru Watanabe, chairman of Marukin USA, signed a formal agreement to pay, as previously disclosed, $52.9 million for a 49% interest in Riviera Associates, a new partnership formed with Laaco Ltd., the club's current owner. Laaco will retain the majority stake in the new partnership.
SPORTS
August 11, 1995 | JOHN CHERWA
A look at golf's backside, the stories you were never meant to see. PARKING FROM HELL So, are you tired from your tram ride from one of three rather distant parking locations? Well, not everyone had to make that ride. A survey of the closest parking spots found some people right in the front row of a lot designated for "Players Only," just paces from the front of the clubhouse.
SPORTS
February 22, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, everything had seemed OK. Calvin Peete had always been able to play on any golf course where the PGA Tour stopped. None of the professional players had ever been denied access to a locker room. No fan had ever been turned away because of color. "So it was a slap in the face to us when the Shoal Creek situation happened," said Sid Wilson, director of public relations for the PGA Tour. "But as our commissioner said, it wasn't a tough decision for us to make, at all.
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