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Noise Pollution

NEWS
August 30, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emperor Julius Caesar reportedly tried to halt chariot racing over Rome's cobblestones because of the ear-shattering clatter it caused. The 19th-Century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer denounced "the truly infernal cracking of whips in the narrow resounding streets" as "the most . . . disgraceful of all noises." And when asked what he would like the orchestra to play while he was dining at a posh London restaurant, playwright George Bernard Shaw caustically replied: "Dominoes."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Noise pollution from commercial jets, private planes and helicopters operating out of Van Nuys and Burbank airports has prompted some San Fernando Valley residents to distribute flyers with telephone numbers residents can call to lodge complaints. Changing flight patterns and schedules are among suggestions residents have made, while pilots and airlines insist they are doing everything they can to minimize noise.
NEWS
November 15, 2005 | Veronique de Turenne, Special to The Times
HIKING in quiet isn't hard. Just head out to the desert with a couple of quarts of water -- no cellphone, PDA, MP3 player or other electronic umbilical cord -- and there you are. Splendid isolation. But if it's quiet you crave on a wilderness jaunt, then things get a little challenging. Whether it's social pressure or just human nature, two or more people on a trail tend to chat. A lot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS Inc. has joined a chorus of public opposition to the Burbank Airport's plans for building a larger terminal, claiming its popular production facility in Studio City loses thousands of dollars annually due to disruptive aircraft noise. The network's announcement Friday came as the latest surprise this week for airport officials, who also learned they are being sued by the city of Los Angeles for the fourth time since 1977.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1985
The leaf blower, together with litter in the streets, makes life more depressing than all the atomic bombs in the world combined. Who needs this fire hazard, dirt-maker, noisy thing that vibrates so much you can hear and feel it a block away? Gardeners are going deaf from them and the public is getting more and more stressful and irritable from all the noise pollution. Most people aren't even aware consciously that their increased irritability is because of noise. The Legislature recently killed in committee a bill to at least study noise pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1992
The fast-food business on the commercial street below my home creates a lot of noise, including garbage pickup between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. What are the local ordinances against noise pollution and how can I get something done? JAMES M. SULLIVAN, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991
There is no doubt why the Catalina Boy Scout camp must be closed. The noise pollution alone--boys cheering, laughing and singing--is unacceptable. Besides, educating 50 to 100 wealthy visitors weekly, at a newly built resort on the site, will certainly have a much more positive impact than exposing and teaching 400 young boys about the marine environment. JOHN ARONSON, Los Angeles
BUSINESS
May 13, 1990
In "Shoppers to Get TV News, Ads at Checkout Lanes," (May 3), we are told (warned?) that we soon may be forced to endure the sight and sound of TV commercials while we shop and stand in line at the supermarket. It's not much of a threat. I shall go far out of my way, and pay more, to avoid such noise pollution. FRED SCIFERS Downey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1990
I have been reading recently in the L.A. Times and elsewhere about the serious and increasing problems of traffic and noise pollution in our beach communities. While a number of so-called experts are proposing expensive "solutions" to these problems, they are ignoring the fact that the best cure is often prevention. And, there is only one way to prevent noise pollution and traffic congestion from getting any worse: to maintain or reduce housing density. Due to ever-increasing housing density, our once-charming beach towns are becoming miniature Daly Cities.
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