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Non Hodgkin S Lymphoma

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BUSINESS
February 1, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS
Tobacco plants may provide a new way of treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that will strike an estimated 56,800 Americans this year. Scientists at Stanford University and Biosource Technologies are developing a customized lymphoma vaccine produced in tobacco plants that are being grown indoors at the biotechnology company's Vacaville, Calif., facility. The most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma affects cells that produce antibodies to infectious disease.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 2005 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc., Swiss drug maker Roche Holding and Biogen Idec Inc. said they had completed their U.S. marketing application to expand use of their drug Rituxan to patients never before treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The popular medicine was approved in the United States in 1997 for patients with the low-grade form of that type of lymphoma who had failed to benefit from other standard therapies.
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NEWS
March 30, 1990
Three Colombians convicted of possessing 1,200 pounds of cocaine for sale in the largest drug bust in the history of the Glendale Police Department were sentenced Thursday to a combined 41 years in state prison. Superior Court Judge Gordon Ringer sentenced Adolfo Guevara, 28, to 19 years; Ferney Tavera, 25, to 12 years, and Luis Varcla, 26, to 10 years. Ana Agudelo, 72, also a Colombian, was placed on six months' probation, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Ellen Berk.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine an anti-cancer drug that acts like a guided missile, seeking out a patient's malignant cells and then destroying them with microscopic radioactive warheads, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Such an approach to battling cancer was first envisioned a quarter of a century ago with the discovery of a way to make large amounts of highly specific antibodies, natural substances that travel through the bloodstream and can seek out targets on the surface of tumors.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine an anti-cancer drug that acts like a guided missile, seeking out a patient's malignant cells and then destroying them with microscopic radioactive warheads, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Such an approach to battling cancer was first envisioned a quarter of a century ago with the discovery of a way to make large amounts of highly specific antibodies, natural substances that travel through the bloodstream and can seek out targets on the surface of tumors.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | Reuters
Former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis has non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a treatable form of cancer of the lymphatic system, and has been undergoing chemotherapy for about a month, the New York Times reported in today's editions. The paper said Onassis, 64, had not interrupted her personal routines or her duties as a book editor.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2005 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc., Swiss drug maker Roche Holding and Biogen Idec Inc. said they had completed their U.S. marketing application to expand use of their drug Rituxan to patients never before treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The popular medicine was approved in the United States in 1997 for patients with the low-grade form of that type of lymphoma who had failed to benefit from other standard therapies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Beck was a typical 19-year-old college kid struggling to keep his grades up when he went to a doctor to have a couple of small bumps on his head examined. The doctor told him they were impacted hair follicles, nothing to worry about. So on Jan. 23, he had them surgically removed. The bumps turned out to be cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of the disease that causes cells in the immune system to spin out of control, create tumors and dispatch them throughout the body.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Coulter Pharmaceutical Inc.'s Bexxar drug could be a breakthrough therapy for low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, said analysts whom the company briefed on late-stage clinical trials of the medication.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Biotech giant Amgen is hoping to bolster its cancer drug pipeline by buying fellow drug developer Micromet Inc. for $1.16 billion. At $11 a share, with an Amgen subsidiary buying the majority of Micromet's stock and then the Amgen parent company picking up the rest, the price represents a 33% premium on Micromet's closing price Wednesday. Thousand Oaks-based Amgen is itself among the world's premier drug makers but hasn't had many popular drugs in years. Rockville, Md.-based Micromet, meanwhile, is testing a promising treatment for leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS
Tobacco plants may provide a new way of treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that will strike an estimated 56,800 Americans this year. Scientists at Stanford University and Biosource Technologies are developing a customized lymphoma vaccine produced in tobacco plants that are being grown indoors at the biotechnology company's Vacaville, Calif., facility. The most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma affects cells that produce antibodies to infectious disease.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1998 | (Bloomberg News)
Coulter Pharmaceutical Inc.'s Bexxar drug could be a breakthrough therapy for low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, said analysts whom the company briefed on late-stage clinical trials of the medication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Beck was a typical 19-year-old college kid struggling to keep his grades up when he went to a doctor to have a couple of small bumps on his head examined. The doctor told him they were impacted hair follicles, nothing to worry about. So on Jan. 23, he had them surgically removed. The bumps turned out to be cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of the disease that causes cells in the immune system to spin out of control, create tumors and dispatch them throughout the body.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | Reuters
Former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis has non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a treatable form of cancer of the lymphatic system, and has been undergoing chemotherapy for about a month, the New York Times reported in today's editions. The paper said Onassis, 64, had not interrupted her personal routines or her duties as a book editor.
NEWS
March 30, 1990
Three Colombians convicted of possessing 1,200 pounds of cocaine for sale in the largest drug bust in the history of the Glendale Police Department were sentenced Thursday to a combined 41 years in state prison. Superior Court Judge Gordon Ringer sentenced Adolfo Guevara, 28, to 19 years; Ferney Tavera, 25, to 12 years, and Luis Varcla, 26, to 10 years. Ana Agudelo, 72, also a Colombian, was placed on six months' probation, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Ellen Berk.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
The twin Vermont marble statues Contemplation of Justice and Guardian of Law stood watch over a makeshift encampment at the bottom of the Supreme Court steps today, as the sun rose on the first day of arguments in a historic case on the Obama administration's healthcare law. The encampment was for people hoping for a seat in the court's public gallery, some of whom have been waiting in line since Friday. The spectators who will sit in on today's arguments were ushered in around 7:30 am EST, but many elected to wait another day to get a seat when the court is scheduled to address the constitutionality of the law's so-called individual mandate.
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