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Nong Duc Manh

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NEWS
February 28, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese President Jiang Zemin began a three-day visit to Vietnam and hailed progress in relations with a neighbor that is one of the world's last communist states. Vietnam's state television said that in Jiang's talks with Communist Party chief Nong Duc Manh and President Tran Duc Luong, both sides pledged to boost political and economic ties and resolve territorial disputes peacefully.
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WORLD
June 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Vietnam on Tuesday appointed a new prime minister and president representing a fresh generation of reformists from the commercial south. Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung, 56, became Vietnam's youngest prime minister since the country's reunification in 1975, when the Vietnam War ended. He had been groomed for the job, and has a record of fostering economic growth as he took responsibility for overseeing the economy.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Vietnam's ruling Communist Party named National Assembly Chairman Nong Duc Manh as its new secretary-general Sunday, filling the country's most powerful leadership post. Sixty-year-old Manh has been speaker of the National Assembly for nine years. Under his leadership, the assembly, which once rubber-stamped decisions behind closed doors, became a forum for televised discussions of policy issues.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam's National Assembly chose conservative Gen. Le Duc Anh as president Wednesday in what observers said underlines the Communist Party's determination to keep a firm grip on economic reforms. The 72-year-old Anh, Vietnam's top general, was the only candidate and received all of the secret ballots cast by the 392-seat Assembly, the state-run Voice of Vietnam radio said.
OPINION
April 22, 2001
The ruling old dogs in Hanoi could not learn new tricks, and they never really tried very hard. They gave a new name--doi moi, or open door--to their Communist governing philosophy though they kept the old tools: political oppression and rigid economic order administered by arbitrary rules and corrupt officials. Transforming Communist Vietnam will take years, but the pressure on the power elite is mounting and some of the officials who stood in the way of progress are leaving.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's top leader, Communist Party Secretary-General Le Kha Phieu, was removed from office Tuesday because of disenchantment with his conservative style, officials said. The leading candidate to replace the 70-year-old party leader reportedly is Nong Duc Manh, a member of the ethnic Tay minority who would be expected to promote economic change and the development of a market economy more quickly than his predecessor.
WORLD
April 9, 2004 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
The diminutive soldier in a brown Vietnamese army uniform bounded past a U.S. honor guard and up the Pentagon's red-carpeted steps. At the landing, the door opened and a smiling Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld appeared with an outstretched hand. Pham Van Tra clasped it warmly.
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