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NEWS
May 17, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of treating a common cold in Britain dropped by as much as 50% on Wednesday when more than 30 years of legal price-fixing on nonprescription drugs came to an abrupt end. This was good news for Britons with the sniffles but a headache for the more than 6,000 owners of independent pharmacies, who say they will not be able to compete with drugstore and supermarket giants. "That was our profit," said Dipak Patel, the pharmacist at Remedys in West London's Maida Vale neighborhood.
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HEALTH
October 25, 2010 | By Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's not too soon to start thinking about how to deal with your flexible spending accounts (FSAs) in 2011. How you can use the accounts ? which allow employees to set aside money from each paycheck, income-tax free, to be used for medical expenses ? is set to change in several key ways. Under the new healthcare reform law, people whose employers offer the accounts will no longer be able to use the funds for non-prescription drugs without a doctor's prescription. (Think antihistamines such as Benadryl or Claritin and their generic versions, or pain relievers such as Advil or Tylenol and generic versions.
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HEALTH
April 10, 2000 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE ITMES
You had a little too much to drink last night, so you really need that morning jog to clear your head. But first, you pop two aspirin for your headache plus a decongestant for your allergies, then wash it all down with a double espresso. Fifteen minutes into your jog, your heart starts doing the mambo. You check with a doctor and discover that the irregular heartbeat was likely triggered by excessive use of stimulants.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2009 | Andrew Zajac
In an attempt to reduce the deaths and serious health problems caused by misuse of medication, the Food and Drug Administration is trying to identify the most serious threats and find ways to avoid them. About 1.5 million preventable "adverse drug events" occur in the United States every year, according to a 2007 study by the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences. Aside from the toll on health, the errors cost an estimated $4 billion a year, the study found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
At 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, 12 boxes of alli, the first FDA-sanctioned diet drug to be sold without a prescription, were placed on the top shelf of a Santa Monica Walgreens' diet section. Four hours later, all but one had been sold. "I have never in my life experienced anything like this," store manager Roe Love, a pharmacist for 20 years, said as she eyed the empty space next to the last box of 90 capsules selling for $59.99.
HEALTH
September 15, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER
It's September 1997, and you've got a monster headache. But according to your aspirin bottle, its contents expired in December 1996. Will the expired pills still do in the headache? Or worse, will they do you in? On both counts, probably not, say medical experts. Drugs like headache relievers merely become less potent--not dangerous--over time. The same goes for the majority of over-the-counter medications--they are not very likely to harm you even if taken after their expiration dates.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2008 | Deborah L. Shelton
At least 2.2 million older adults in the U.S. take medicine in combinations that could trigger dangerous drug interactions, causing gastrointestinal bleeding, muscle breakdown, disruption in heart rhythm and other serious problems, according to a study by researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Half of the interactions involved over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin or dietary supplements. Overall, 1 in 25 older adults risked serious drug interactions, the study found.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration said it will ban the sale of all non-prescription drugs used to treat enlargement of the prostate gland. The agency said its review of these products found little evidence any of them eliminates, arrests or treats the condition, called benign prostatic hypertrophy. Surgery is currently the only effective treatment, the FDA said.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The national Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta called for tighter safeguards to prevent tampering of over-the-counter medications after the deaths of two people from cyanide-laced Sudafed cold capsules in Washington state. The CDC noted that capsules have been the chosen target for tampering and that some manufacturers have substituted larger tablets for capsules to make tampering easier to detect.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1993 | PRADNYA JOSHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over-the-counter antacids, laxatives and anti-diarrheals must carry stronger warning labels about possible interaction with other medications under rules issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA also proposed that warnings be clarified on sleep aids and other non-prescription drugs used to treat nausea and vomiting.
TRAVEL
January 25, 2009 | Hugo Martin
At some point, almost every traveler suffers from seasickness or some other form of motion sickness. Mal de mer, as the French call it, is so common on cruise ships that some lines dispense anti-nausea pills free of charge. Remember, your vulnerability to seasickness is not a reflection of your fortitude or machismo. Even actor George Clooney was stricken during the filming of the seafaring movie saga "The Perfect Storm."
NATIONAL
December 24, 2008 | Deborah L. Shelton
At least 2.2 million older adults in the U.S. take medicine in combinations that could trigger dangerous drug interactions, causing gastrointestinal bleeding, muscle breakdown, disruption in heart rhythm and other serious problems, according to a study by researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Half of the interactions involved over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin or dietary supplements. Overall, 1 in 25 older adults risked serious drug interactions, the study found.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2008 | bloomberg news
C.B. Fleet Co., a closely held maker of laxative products, said Thursday that it was voluntarily withdrawing its oral, over-the-counter bowel cleansing solutions after U.S. health regulators warned that such drugs may harm the kidneys. C.B. Fleet said it would recall its Fleet Phospho-soda and Fleet Phospho-soda EZ-Prep Bowel Cleansing System used to clear the bowels before a colonoscopy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2008 | David Haldane
A Huntington Beach man was scheduled to be arraigned today in the death of a 14-year-old bicyclist he is accused of hitting while driving under the influence of narcotics and while sending a text message from his cellphone. Jeffrey Francis Woods, 20, is charged with vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence in the Aug. 29 death of Daniel Oates. Woods is accused of being under the influence of Vicodin when he suddenly swerved over several lanes of oncoming traffic in his pickup truck and struck Daniel, who was in the bike lane on the opposite side of the road.
HEALTH
December 17, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Doctors have prescribed statin drugs to millions of people to reduce their cholesterol levels and thus cut the risk of heart attacks. The pharmaceutical company Merck & Co has asked the Food and Drug Administration to let pharmacies sell a lower dose formulation of the company's statin drug Mevacor, also known as lovastatin, over the counter. On Thursday, an FDA advisory panel recommended that the agency reject Merck's third such request. The FDA is expected to make a decision early next year.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Johnson & Johnson's allergy treatment Zyrtec-D was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for sale without a prescription. The nonprescription form of the drug, which will be available in January, is expected to cost as much as a third less than prescription Zyrtec.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government announced that it will ban 111 ingredients from non-prescription diet drugs because they do not help people lose weight. The ban includes substances--such as alcohol, ascorbic acid, caffeine, sodium and yeast--that the Food and Drug Administration said are often found in diet products. Many products that contained the banned ingredients already have been reformulated or are no longer on the market, government and industry spokesmen said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1996 | From Reuters
A federal advisory committee recommended Friday that the Food and Drug Administration approve the over-the-counter sale of Nicotrol, the nicotine transdermal patch made by Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc., and Nicoderm, made by Alza Corp. and Germany's Hoechst. Nicotrol, used to ease the withdrawal symptoms of stopping smoking, is now sold only through prescription by McNeil Consumer Products, a unit of Johnson & Johnson.
HEALTH
October 29, 2007 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
These days, cocaine, heroin and other illicit drugs are better known for the problems they cause than the ones they solve. Over a century ago, though, the stimulant effects of cocaine and the painkilling qualities of heroin and other opium-derived drugs made these common ingredients in over-the-counter medicines. That trend created at least one urban legend that happens to be true: Coca-Cola, originally concocted in the 1880s as a cure-all medicinal tonic, really did once contain cocaine.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
What's a mother to do? For decades, parents have been turning to the nation's pharmacies for help when their children come down with coughs, runny noses, sneezes and your standard cold. Kid-size doses of pills, sprays and cough syrups fill Americans' medicine cabinets. Now, the federal government is questioning whether some of these children's medicines should be pulled from drugstore shelves for safety, and some parents are wondering whether officials are going too far.
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