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NEWS
June 16, 1988 | EILEEN V. QUIGLEY, Times Staff Writer
"People say I have helped him to be a genius. What they'll be saying next is that if it hadn't been for that ignoramus of a woman what a man he would have been! But never you mind. I could tell them a thing or two about him after 20 years." Nora Joyce was speaking about her husband, James Joyce. With characteristic frankness, she acknowledged what she knew to be true: that Joyce's admirers found her an unsuitable companion for her brilliant husband.
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BOOKS
October 2, 1988 | CAROLYN SEE
A long-standing, gentle, ethnic joke states that a lawyer is a nice Jewish boy who can't stand the sight of blood. In the same vein, it might be said that literary scholarship, traditionally, has been practiced by aggressive bruisers who can't catch a football. Few people read scholarship except scholars, but as a pastime, it's about as refined as ice hockey. More than that, it is still, to a remarkable extent, a white man's game. Imagine, then, the temerity of a woman, without even a Ph.D.
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BOOKS
October 2, 1988
"The links (between Nora Joyce and Molly Bloom) are strengthened by Joyce's detailed notes for Ulysses , where he makes many of the connections explicit, often repeating some of the references to Nora he had made in the notes to Exiles: the girlish pinafore, the buttoned boots, the grief over the girlhood friend who went off to America. Joyce, of course, embroidered, expanded, and compressed his raw material, but in Molly much that appears to be Nora remains visible and often little altered.
BOOKS
October 2, 1988
"The links (between Nora Joyce and Molly Bloom) are strengthened by Joyce's detailed notes for Ulysses , where he makes many of the connections explicit, often repeating some of the references to Nora he had made in the notes to Exiles: the girlish pinafore, the buttoned boots, the grief over the girlhood friend who went off to America. Joyce, of course, embroidered, expanded, and compressed his raw material, but in Molly much that appears to be Nora remains visible and often little altered.
BOOKS
October 2, 1988 | CAROLYN SEE
A long-standing, gentle, ethnic joke states that a lawyer is a nice Jewish boy who can't stand the sight of blood. In the same vein, it might be said that literary scholarship, traditionally, has been practiced by aggressive bruisers who can't catch a football. Few people read scholarship except scholars, but as a pastime, it's about as refined as ice hockey. More than that, it is still, to a remarkable extent, a white man's game. Imagine, then, the temerity of a woman, without even a Ph.D.
BOOKS
August 12, 1990
I was very happy to see the article by Nora Joyce-biographer, Brenda Maddox, in the July 22 Book Review. As an avid Joycean who doesn't really fit into any of Maddox's categories, I enjoyed reading the comparison and the characterizations of conference-goers. I was shocked, however, to see the title of Joyce's last work manhandled. ROBYN L. BEZAR INCLINE VILLAGE, NV Editor's Note: Lawrence died in Vence, France; not Venice, Italy. The title of Joyce's last work is "Finnegans Wake," not "Finnegan's Wake."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the pretext of James and Nora Joyce confronting the mental deterioration of their daughter Lucia sounds like a intellectual melodrama, that's about what it is in Lynne Kaufman's "Speaking in Tongues." Although the current Cast Theatre staging boasts magnetic performances from Paul Elder and Wendy Robie as the writer and his wife-equivalent, the play itself gets bogged down in its own pretensions.
OPINION
July 31, 2009
Re "What he's been living for," July 26 Sen. Ted Kennedy is reported to have written for a newsmagazine: "I have enjoyed the best medical care money (and a good insurance policy) can buy. ... Every American should be able to get the same treatment that U.S. senators are entitled to." Can he be kidding? I don't know details of the senatorial plan, but I suspect it may be somewhat more generous than what President Obama has in mind for us non-senators. Bob White Manhattan Beach -- Lovely sentiments from Sen. Kennedy.
BOOKS
July 2, 1989
LIBRA by Don Delillo (Penguin: $4.95). Lee Harvey Oswald's astrological sign and his troubled childhood are the focus in this fictionalized account of the Kennedy assassination. WHITE CARGO by Stuart Woods (Avon: $4.95). After Columbian drug dealers murder a millionaire's wife, he must rescue his daughter from their jungle compound. THE PIGEON by Patrick Suskind (Washington Square Press: $5.95). Allegorical tale about a man whose self-imposed orderly life is disrupted by a visit from a pigeon.
BOOKS
August 9, 1992 | Brenda Maddox, Maddox, author of "Nora: The Life of Nora Joyce," is working on a biography of D.H. Lawrence
James Joyce had two children. They had Italian names--Giorgio (born in 1905) and Lucia (born in 1907)--because Joyce and his common-law wife Nora had left their native Ireland for Trieste, where Joyce eked out a meager living teaching English. The children had a scrappy life, suffering first poverty, then rootlessness. In 1915 the Joyces moved to Zurich because of the First World War; then in 1920 to Paris where the artistic climate was better for avant-garde novelists.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | EILEEN V. QUIGLEY, Times Staff Writer
"People say I have helped him to be a genius. What they'll be saying next is that if it hadn't been for that ignoramus of a woman what a man he would have been! But never you mind. I could tell them a thing or two about him after 20 years." Nora Joyce was speaking about her husband, James Joyce. With characteristic frankness, she acknowledged what she knew to be true: that Joyce's admirers found her an unsuitable companion for her brilliant husband.
OPINION
June 16, 2010 | Tim Rutten
"History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Wednesday, people around the world will gather in libraries and theaters, pubs and restaurants, streets and squares to commemorate a precise set of events that included the preceding snatch of conversation and that occurred between daybreak and midnight in a provincial European city on June 16, 1904 — events they know full well never happened. This, of course, is Bloomsday, the annual celebration of the 20th century's greatest novel, "Ulysses," and of the genius of its author, the Irishman James Joyce.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On one level, Lynne Kaufman's "Speaking In Tongues" begs comparison to Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire." Both plays deal with a protagonist woman struggling with her untapped sexuality, and in both plays, the protagonist's trauma leads to complete mental breakdown. In "Streetcar," Blanche lusts after her sister's husband, Stanley Kowalski; in "Speaking in Tongues," Lucia Joyce lusts after her father's assistant, Patrick Gregory.
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