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Nora Lam

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion picture media to the devil," Orange County televangelist Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. The film, "China Cry," is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reviews for "China Cry," the inspirational movie produced by Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, were mostly downbeat when it opened in New York last week as part of a national re-release, but that didn't prevent ticket sales from topping $4 million since its release last fall. The New York Times' Steven Holden said the film "has many of the features of a Hollywood epic except that it is set in the 20th Century. . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reviews for "China Cry," the inspirational movie produced by Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, were mostly downbeat when it opened in New York last week as part of a national re-release, but that didn't prevent ticket sales from topping $4 million since its release last fall. The New York Times' Steven Holden said the film "has many of the features of a Hollywood epic except that it is set in the 20th Century. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several thousand of the faithful and the curious gathered at a shopping mall here Saturday for a Hollywood-style promotion of "China Cry," a feature film produced by Tustin television evangelist Paul F. Crouch. Such a glitzy event--complete with remote broadcasts, rap singers and a movie star--might be standard procedure in the movie business, but Saturday's razzle-dazzle was one of the few traditional things about Crouch's venture into the film industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several thousand of the faithful and the curious gathered at a shopping mall here Saturday for a Hollywood-style promotion of "China Cry," a feature film produced by Tustin television evangelist Paul F. Crouch. Such a glitzy event--complete with remote broadcasts, rap singers and a movie star--might be standard procedure in the movie business, but Saturday's razzle-dazzle was one of the few traditional things about Crouch's venture into the film industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion-picture media to the devil," Trinity Broadcasting Network President Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. "China Cry" is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James F. Collier, a writer and director of religion-based films, has died at the age of 62. Collier died Monday of complications after a fall at his Creston, Calif., home, a spokesman for his film distribution company said Thursday. The filmmaker worked extensively for evangelist Billy Graham's World Wide Pictures during the late 1950s and the 1960s, writing, assisting producers and finally directing about 50 documentary projects and features.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | From John M. Wilson
Irene Cara goes into a studio this week to record "No One but You," the love theme from the Christian-funded feature film "China Cry"--which has been in release for more than three weeks. The song will be hurriedly edited over the credits of 200 existing prints of the film as they are in transition to new theaters. The belated, highly unusual move will also result in a single to be released by Warner Alliance, along with the soundtrack album, when the movie broadens its release in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
"China Cry," the inspirational film produced by Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, grossed $609,660 in its first weekend of release, making it one of the top 20 moneymakers in the nation for that period. Now showing in 135 theaters nationally, the film averaged $4,516 per screen, ranking it third in the country in that category. In Orange County, where it is playing on 13 screens, "China Cry" grossed nearly $50,000, averaging nearly $4,000 per screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese film director Akira Kurosawa and the two individuals who first raised the issue of discrimination in the casting for the Broadway production of "Miss Saigon" will be honored tonight by the Assn. of Asian Pacific American Artists during its annual media awards ceremonies at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion-picture media to the devil," Trinity Broadcasting Network President Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. "China Cry" is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he is "not willing to surrender the motion picture media to the devil," Orange County televangelist Paul F. Crouch is breaking into the movie business with a $6-million feature film, aimed at mainstream theater audiences and financed entirely by donations. The film, "China Cry," is based on the life of Chinese-American evangelist Nora Lam and carries the subtitle, "A True Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"China Cry" (selected theaters), the first theatrical production from the Trinity Broadcasting Network, a Christian organization, is a stirring, large-scale epic--and a romantic love story as well--based on San Jose evangelist Nora Lam's early life and long ordeal as a Christian in Communist China.
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