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Norio Ohga

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1992 | NORMAN LEBRECHT, Norman Lebrecht, a free-lance writer based in London, traveled to Tokyo for this story
About 2 o'clock each morning, Norio Ohga, the president of Sony Corp., rises and heads for his study. It's not concern for his company's financial health that disrupts the 62-year-old chief executive's sleep, rather the urge to fulfill a lifelong private ambition: to be a symphonic conductor. On his desk at his home in Tokyo lies a full orchestral score of Mendelssohn's "Scottish" Symphony.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2011 | Los Angeles Times wire reports
Former Sony President and Chairman Norio Ohga, who gave up a career as an opera singer to join the fledgling consumer electronics maker in the 1950s and later led its expansion from hardware to software and entertainment and developing the compact disc, died Saturday. He was 81. Ohga, who led the company from 1982 to 1995, died of multiple organ failure in Tokyo, Sony said. Some decisions made during Ohga's presidency, such as the $3.4-billion purchase of Columbia Pictures, were criticized as unwise and costly at the time.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1996
Sony Chairman Hospitalized: Norio Ohga, 66, was admitted to the hospital suffering from overwork, and doctors have urged him to rest for a few days, a Sony Corp. spokesman said. Ohga has a tough work schedule with many commitments outside the company, the company said, including his job as chairman of the Electronic Industry Assn. of Japan, which is involved in industry talks with the U.S. on semiconductors. A trip Ohga planned to Europe this week was canceled.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid deepening gloom in corporate Japan, one of the nation's leading industrialists said Thursday the economy is near collapse and blasted Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto for policies that he said could trigger a global recession. In a highly unusual attack on Japan's top leadership by a prominent business executive, Sony Corp. Chairman Norio Ohga said Hashimoto's tight fiscal policies were reminiscent of mistakes by U.S. President Herbert Hoover that led to the Great Depression of the 1930s.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid deepening gloom in corporate Japan, one of the nation's leading industrialists said Thursday the economy is near collapse and blasted Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto for policies that he said could trigger a global recession. In a highly unusual attack on Japan's top leadership by a prominent business executive, Sony Corp. Chairman Norio Ohga said Hashimoto's tight fiscal policies were reminiscent of mistakes by U.S. President Herbert Hoover that led to the Great Depression of the 1930s.
MAGAZINE
June 23, 1996 | Gale Eisenstodt, Gale Eisenstodt is former bureau chief in Tokyo for Forbes magazine
Nobuyuki Idei, president of Sony Corp., is in a bad mood. He is 15 minutes behind schedule, and the last place he wants to be, it seems, is in a private parlor of an elegant but charmless French restaurant in Tokyo, having to explain the future of his company. Fifty-eight years old, Idei has a boyish face that seems incapable of masking his emotions. At the moment, the muscles around his jaw are tense. The marketing man in him aims to please, but he seems acutely aware that his every utterance will be scrutinized.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 1986 memoir, Sony Corp. Chairman Akio Morita berated American executives for their bad habit of jumping ship the minute a competitor offered more pay or a quick promotion. "I vowed that my company would do its best to avoid adopting this aspect of American managerial technique," he wrote. Still, Morita's top U.S. executives spent most of last week tangling with Time Warner Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
When Sony bought Columbia Pictures, the shock wave rolled across America--the Japanese had finally made the move into Hollywood. And the bitter legal fight with Warner for producers Guber and Peters sent aftershocks through the film industry for months. A look behind the scenes of this epic deal provides insight into how Sony will do business in Hollywood and what's in store for the '90s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2011 | Los Angeles Times wire reports
Former Sony President and Chairman Norio Ohga, who gave up a career as an opera singer to join the fledgling consumer electronics maker in the 1950s and later led its expansion from hardware to software and entertainment and developing the compact disc, died Saturday. He was 81. Ohga, who led the company from 1982 to 1995, died of multiple organ failure in Tokyo, Sony said. Some decisions made during Ohga's presidency, such as the $3.4-billion purchase of Columbia Pictures, were criticized as unwise and costly at the time.
MAGAZINE
June 23, 1996 | Gale Eisenstodt, Gale Eisenstodt is former bureau chief in Tokyo for Forbes magazine
Nobuyuki Idei, president of Sony Corp., is in a bad mood. He is 15 minutes behind schedule, and the last place he wants to be, it seems, is in a private parlor of an elegant but charmless French restaurant in Tokyo, having to explain the future of his company. Fifty-eight years old, Idei has a boyish face that seems incapable of masking his emotions. At the moment, the muscles around his jaw are tense. The marketing man in him aims to please, but he seems acutely aware that his every utterance will be scrutinized.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1996
Sony Chairman Hospitalized: Norio Ohga, 66, was admitted to the hospital suffering from overwork, and doctors have urged him to rest for a few days, a Sony Corp. spokesman said. Ohga has a tough work schedule with many commitments outside the company, the company said, including his job as chairman of the Electronic Industry Assn. of Japan, which is involved in industry talks with the U.S. on semiconductors. A trip Ohga planned to Europe this week was canceled.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1992 | NORMAN LEBRECHT, Norman Lebrecht, a free-lance writer based in London, traveled to Tokyo for this story
About 2 o'clock each morning, Norio Ohga, the president of Sony Corp., rises and heads for his study. It's not concern for his company's financial health that disrupts the 62-year-old chief executive's sleep, rather the urge to fulfill a lifelong private ambition: to be a symphonic conductor. On his desk at his home in Tokyo lies a full orchestral score of Mendelssohn's "Scottish" Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
When Sony bought Columbia Pictures, the shock wave rolled across America--the Japanese had finally made the move into Hollywood. And the bitter legal fight with Warner for producers Guber and Peters sent aftershocks through the film industry for months. A look behind the scenes of this epic deal provides insight into how Sony will do business in Hollywood and what's in store for the '90s.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 1986 memoir, Sony Corp. Chairman Akio Morita berated American executives for their bad habit of jumping ship the minute a competitor offered more pay or a quick promotion. "I vowed that my company would do its best to avoid adopting this aspect of American managerial technique," he wrote. Still, Morita's top U.S. executives spent most of last week tangling with Time Warner Inc.
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