Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNorma Holloway Johnson
IN THE NEWS

Norma Holloway Johnson

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Norma Holloway Johnson, a trailblazing former chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., who gained national prominence when she oversaw the grand jury investigation into President Clinton's relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky, has died. She was 79. Johnson died Sunday at her brother's home in Lake Charles, La., according to a court statement. The cause was not given. Johnson was the first black woman to be appointed to the federal bench in Washington and she is the only woman ever to serve as chief judge of the court.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Norma Holloway Johnson, a trailblazing former chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., who gained national prominence when she oversaw the grand jury investigation into President Clinton's relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky, has died. She was 79. Johnson died Sunday at her brother's home in Lake Charles, La., according to a court statement. The cause was not given. Johnson was the first black woman to be appointed to the federal bench in Washington and she is the only woman ever to serve as chief judge of the court.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
The chief judge of the U.S. District Court bypassed the traditional random assignment system to send criminal cases against presidential friends Webster L. Hubbell and Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie to judges appointed by President Clinton, according to court officials. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson's decision to abandon the longtime random computer assignment for the high-profile cases has raised concerns among several other judges, according to Associated Press interviews with them.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
The chief judge of the U.S. District Court bypassed the traditional random assignment system to send criminal cases against presidential friends Webster L. Hubbell and Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie to judges appointed by President Clinton, according to court officials. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson's decision to abandon the longtime random computer assignment for the high-profile cases has raised concerns among several other judges, according to Associated Press interviews with them.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson, whose authority over federal grand jury disputes includes the question of White House executive privilege, is known for her austere demeanor, tough courtroom discipline and deliberative manner in deciding cases. A former teacher in the rough-and-tumble District of Columbia school system, Johnson often takes no more from lawyers than she once did from the junior high school students she taught for four years. "She's very evenhanded.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | Associated Press
A former Agency for International Development financial officer who admitted embezzling $1.37 million was sentenced Friday to five years in prison. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson ordered William J. Burns, 48, to begin serving his sentence immediately. Under a 1984 sentencing law, he cannot be paroled before serving the full five-year term.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | Associated Press
Former Rep. Joseph P. Kolter (D-Pa.) was sentenced Wednesday to six months in prison for conspiring to defraud taxpayers in the House post office scandal. Kolter, 69, pleaded guilty in May to conspiring to trade government-purchased postage stamps and vouchers for personal cash. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson said she will recommend the sentence be served at a prison hospital in Rochester, Minn. Johnson freed him pending availability of a space at that facility.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Reuters
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr and White House lawyers squared off Friday over the invoking of executive privilege to block the testimony of key presidential aides. The closed hearing before Chief U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson represented a sharp escalation of the battle between the White House and Starr in the 2-month-old grand jury investigation.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | Associated Press
An IBM Corp. subsidiary agreed Friday to pay $8.5 million in federal fines for selling powerful computers ultimately destined for a Russian nuclear weapons laboratory. IBM East Europe/Asia Ltd., the Russian subsidiary of IBM, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Washington to 17 criminal charges. Judge Norma Holloway Johnson imposed the maximum fine allowed under the law, which is designed to prevent the spread of nuclear weapon technology. Prosecutors said the IBM subsidiary sold $1.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge ordered former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski to report to a federal medical prison in Rochester, Minn., July 22 to begin serving a 17-month sentence for mail fraud. The Illinois Democrat, who underwent prostate surgery in May, wanted to report to a federal prison in Oxford, Wis., which is closer to his native Chicago. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson granted him the extra time to recuperate but refused to allow him to report to Oxford.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson, whose authority over federal grand jury disputes includes the question of White House executive privilege, is known for her austere demeanor, tough courtroom discipline and deliberative manner in deciding cases. A former teacher in the rough-and-tumble District of Columbia school system, Johnson often takes no more from lawyers than she once did from the junior high school students she taught for four years. "She's very evenhanded.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From the Washington Post
President Clinton has invoked executive privilege in an effort to keep two of his top aides from having to testify fully in independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigation of the Monica S. Lewinsky matter, sources said Friday. A team of lawyers for the president, along with Starr and seven prosecutors, presented oral arguments during a closed hearing before U.S. Chief Judge Norma Holloway Johnson on Friday afternoon.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawyers for Richard Nixon's estate have accused the Justice Department of filing an appeal that ignores provisions of a 1974 law requiring the return of private conversations on his White House tapes to Nixon or his heirs. At issue are segments on the original tapes, including historically important material, that Congress decreed should be made public. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson last spring ordered the return of the private portions on the original tapes and any copies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|