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October 24, 2012 | By Nardine Saad
Say what you will about Snooki, but the hard-partying "Jersey Shore" star has taken quite a turn since having her baby boy, Lorenzo. Snooki, the pint-sized star whose real name is Nicole Polizzi, appeared on the "Today" show Wednesday for her first live interview since having her baby with fiance Jionni LaValle. The couple sat down with Savannah Guthrie to discuss her transformation and shift in priorities since wrapping up the final season of the MTV reality series. "It's crazy because, you know me, I just always wanted to have a good time," Snooki said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
From 1953 to 1973, the Central Intelligence Agency spearheaded Project MKUltra, a covert and illegal operation of extreme mind control. For decades, CIA analysts under MKUltra clandestinely questioned American and Canadian citizens through involuntary drug and brainwashing experiments. Scott O'Connor was inspired by these events in his second novel, " Half World" (Simon & Schuster, $26). It's the story of Henry March, a CIA analyst who conducts secret mind-control experiments in San Francisco.
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NEWS
March 25, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a man who has paced the same prison cell for more than three years, author Salman Rushdie said Tuesday that he is ready to break out--even if it isn't quite safe to do so. In a rare interview, Rushdie talked boldly of pushing back the frontiers of his freedom and stealing back the ordinary life that has eluded him since he was forced underground in February, 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The child star who grows into a drug-using train wreck is a cliche that some might have thought  Melissa Joan Hart escaped. The sweet star of "Clarissa Explains It All" and "Sabrina the Teenage Witch" always appeared to be one of the more grounded actresses in Hollywood. But appearances can be deceiving. In a memoir to be released next month, Hart reveals a period of drug experimentation that included ecstacy, pot, mushrooms and mescaline. She partied at the Playboy mansion and kissed a girl -- all in one night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1987 | LAUREN BLAU, Times Staff Writer
Eighteen months ago, Channon Phipps wouldn't go outside to play because he was afraid his friends didn't like him anymore. Last week, the 12-year-old was fidgeting at the kitchen table of his family's El Toro condominium because he was in a hurry to go skateboarding with his friend, Tommy. A hemophiliac who has tested positive for AIDS antibodies, Channon spent six months at home before a court order allowed him to return to Rancho Canada Elementary School in February, 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Normal Life" is normal life for TV comedy--infinite high jinks yielding few laughs--and that's the biggest problem. The premiere on CBS (8 tonight on Channels 2 and 8) puts its two left feet forward. Meet the Harlows: Parents Anne (Cindy Williams) and Max (Max Gail), and kids Tess, 22 (Moon Unit Zappa); Jake, 19 (Dweezil Zappa), and Simon, 13 (Josh Williams). They're zany. As a bonus, Tess' friend Prima (Bess Meyer) is ditzy and the family's neighbor Bob (Jim Staahl) is klutzy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2002 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Prince Takamado, a member of the Japanese royal family known for his love of sports and efforts to make the closeted imperial system more accessible to average Japanese, died Thursday. He was 47. The prince, seventh in line to the throne and a cousin of the current emperor, collapsed while taking a squash lesson at the Canadian embassy. According to Japanese media reports, he slumped over around 4 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ and LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The day after a judge's ruling changed their lives, Mark and Crispina Calvert looked to all the world like many other young married couples: He went off to work and she stayed home with the baby. But there was a telling sign that the emotional tumult that spilled into this house in the wake of a nationally watched test-tube baby case had not yet disappeared--on a sunny California day, the curtains were drawn.
NEWS
April 4, 1985 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
A young militiaman with an impish face stood amid a litter of empty cartridge cases in the rubble of an unfinished apartment building, playfully waving his arms like an orchestra conductor to the sound of mortar- and automatic-rifle fire. His name, he said, is John, and he is 16 years old. For most of his life, people have been shooting at one another here in southern Lebanon. Three weeks before, John was a high school student.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Christ Manos, a nationally respected science teacher at a Montebello high school, spent last Christmas Day--his 50th birthday--in the Alhambra City Jail, accused of murder. The murder allegations, stemming from a jar of severed male genitals found in his Alhambra home, were soon dropped. But Manos' legal nightmare did not end until Oct. 9, when a Pasadena Superior Court judge dismissed charges that he sexually molested a 17-year-old Utah boy who had lived with the teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2013 | By Charles McNulty
In "Someone," Alice McDermott's elegiac new novel, time and place have a dream-like fluidity. There's no doubt that we're in Brooklyn, but this is a Brooklyn of immigrants, largely Irish Catholics, whose new world is a palimpsest in which the old world still routinely peeks through. Marie, the defiantly ordinary narrator of this lyrical study of quotidian life, recalls watching the long parade of subway commuters return home from work. As a "little girl cartoon" of 7 with thick glasses and black bangs, she'd perch herself on the stoop in anticipation of her father's arrival, eager for a glimpse of his evening paper and the "high shine" of his shoes.
OPINION
July 5, 2013
Re "CDC cites overuse of drugs for pain," July 3 As a gynecologist who has been treating women with pain for more than 40 years, I disagree with Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who categorically states that doctors prescribe narcotics too often and too soon for pain. The vast majority of honest physicians take a careful history and deal with individual patients, prescribing only enough narcotics so they can function normally.
WORLD
January 30, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - When he saw the flowing blood, Mohammed Anwar at first thought his son was dead. Five-year-old Muqadas had been shot in the head in June during a firefight between U.S. forces and Taliban insurgents in eastern Afghanistan. But Anwar's quick response not only saved his son's life, it also secured modern medical treatment that has allowed Muqadas to resume a normal life. Thousands of Afghan civilians are killed or maimed each year in warfare, and most are doomed to rudimentary medical care in this impoverished country.
OPINION
December 24, 2012 | By Peter Singer
As the end of the year nears, you no doubt have been receiving a lot of mail requesting your charitable dollars. More donations are made at this time of year than in any other month. But to which organizations should you give, and why? To your house of worship? Or to your school or college? What about to medical research, or to the arts? My answer: None of the above. Given the huge discrepancy between how much most Americans have and how little the world's poorest people have, your dollars are likely to do more good if you give to charities helping people living in extreme poverty in developing countries - as long as you are careful to give only to the most effective ones.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
With 20 years of screen credits behind him, Jake Gyllenhaal is a 31-year-old actor with a résumé that defies expectations. He was raised by parents in the business (director Stephen Gyllenhaal and producer/writer Naomi Foner) and with an actress sister (Maggie Gyllenhaal), but Jake forged his own path with a mix of blockbusters ("Day After Tomorrow"), iconic indies ("Brokeback Mountain") and highly personal projects, like his recent "End of Watch," a $7-million indie about East L.A. cops that took in $39.1 million worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Nardine Saad
Say what you will about Snooki, but the hard-partying "Jersey Shore" star has taken quite a turn since having her baby boy, Lorenzo. Snooki, the pint-sized star whose real name is Nicole Polizzi, appeared on the "Today" show Wednesday for her first live interview since having her baby with fiance Jionni LaValle. The couple sat down with Savannah Guthrie to discuss her transformation and shift in priorities since wrapping up the final season of the MTV reality series. "It's crazy because, you know me, I just always wanted to have a good time," Snooki said.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | ELSTON CARR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melvia Darden, a colon-cancer patient, lost her apartment because of the medical bills. Tracy Newsome said she had to leave home after her boyfriend threatened her with a butcher knife. Ann Quakenbush, who took a bus to Los Angeles from Grand Rapids, Mich., ran out of money and had no place to stay. At Harmony House, a 62-bed women's shelter in South-Central Los Angeles, these women receive the basics to begin a new life. The six-year-old center at 911 E. 25th St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alison Ashcraft has grown up under a microscope. Like the renowned "boy in the bubble," whose vulnerability to illnesses forced him to live in an isolated environment, she was born with severe combined immuno-deficiency disease. But unlike the child made famous by a TV movie, Alison has been able to lead a relatively normal existence because of medical advancements. At age 17, the Laguna Hills High School junior is one of the oldest living sufferers of SCID.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Comic Tig Notaro will publish a collection of humorous, autobiographical essays with Ecco in 2015, the publisher announced Tuesday. Notaro , who has had her own 30-minute special on Comedy Central, has written for TV, has been heard on "This American Life" and regularly appeared on the full gamut of late-night shows, did a set at Largo in August that brought her special attention. Scheduled to appear for her monthly show at Largo with Louis CK as a special guest, Notaro first went to a doctor's appointment.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Irom Sharmila's mother has a simple dream: sitting down to a meal with her daughter. Irom hasn't willingly ingested food or water for 11 years, in protest of a law granting legal immunity to the armed forces for human rights abuses. As the anniversary of her hunger strike nears, her mother imagines what might be. "I'm still waiting for her to come home," said Shakhi Devi, 78, holding an album of her daughter's photos. She rarely visits the 39-year-old, the world's longest-serving hunger striker, because it's too painful.
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