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Norman Cousins

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November 13, 1987 | BILL STEIGERWALD
Norman Cousins is probably best known today as that spirited smart guy who laughed himself back to health with old Groucho Marx movies after being bedridden with a mysterious degenerative disease in 1964. Yet, as a flattering half-hour profile on KCET-TV's "California Stories" reminds us (at 7:30 p.m. Saturday on Channel 28), before his best-selling "Anatomy of an Illness" made him an overnight health guru, Cousins had already racked up many impressive accomplishments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleanor Cousins, widow of author Norman Cousins who wrote her own book about aiding his recovery from a heart attack, has died. She was 87. Cousins, also known as Ellen and a prominent charitable and social figure in Southern California, died Oct. 22 at her home in Los Angeles. In 1986, she shared the Neil H. Jacoby International Award from the UCLA International Student Center with her husband, former editor of the Saturday Review, who died in 1990.
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NEWS
December 6, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Depressed over a recurrence of breast cancer, Flo Porter picked up the telephone one day in 1980 and called Norman Cousins. "I was surprised that he had a listed phone number," the Los Angeles woman recalled. "I told him I was 36. I had just had a mastectomy. I had two small children, and I was fearful of dying." Cousins invited her to his house. "He looked me in the eye and gave me his undivided attention," Porter said of their one-hour meeting.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | LINDSEY TANNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Imagine a painkiller that could treat a variety of ailments, available without a prescription, whose only side effects are chuckles, giggles and maybe even guffaws. The cost? At most, the price of a video. UCLA researchers are hoping humor will prove to be a miracle pill in a study examining a tantalizing premise: What if something that makes you feel good can stop you from feeling bad?
NEWS
December 16, 1990
The article focusing on one aspect of the life of Norman Cousins ("The Positive Influence of Norman Cousins," Dec. 6) mentioned the relationship between Cousins and The Wellness Community. I write this letter to you so that all may know that without Norman Cousins there would be no Wellness Community. Because of Cousins' words and deeds, millions of us learned of the connection between the mind and physical well-being. More personally, his were the words that laid the foundation from which evolved the concept of The Wellness Community, a program that would teach untold numbers of cancer patients to join with their physician and health care team in the fight for recovery.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JACK SMITH
At a recent celebration of the late Norman Cousins' life, 15 of his friends, colleagues and relatives recalled him with warmth and admiration and told how his life had touched theirs. Dr. Franklin Murphy, host of the gathering of hundreds in UCLA's Royce Hall, observed that Cousins was "an uncommon man, brilliant of mind and full of compassion for his fellow man" but added, "I would like to take note of his sense of humor.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
Author and editor Norman Cousins resigned Wednesday from the advisory board of U.S. English, the national organization that is sponsoring Proposition 63 on the Nov. 4 ballot. He said that "there is a very real danger" that passage of the measure would cause Latinos and other racial minorities to be "disadvantaged, denigrated and demeaned."
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman Cousins, a man of letters and peace who late in life wrote of his self-willed triumph over illness, adding yet another dimension to one of the most multifaceted careers of our time, died of heart failure Friday. The editor, author and philosopher, whose name was synonymous with Saturday Review magazine for nearly four decades, died at the UCLA Medical Center after suffering a full cardiac arrest at a Westwood hotel. He was 75.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm very optimistic," Dr. Helen Caldicott, the anti-nuclear activist turned environmentalist, said during an interview in connection with an awards event in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday. "We don't have to overcome the old conditioning about hating the Commies. People don't hate the environment. Everyone loves nature. So it's easier to say, 'Let's talk.'
BOOKS
December 3, 1989 | Melvin Konner, Konner, Ph.D., M.D., an anthropologist who went to medical school in mid-career, is the author of "Becoming a Doctor" (Viking/Penguin)
About 10 years ago, after a distinguished career as a magazine editor and leader of liberal causes, Norman Cousins began a new career--also, I think, distinguished and courageous to boot--as a medical kibitzer. Unlike some critics of medicine, he has immersed himself in it, and in illness--dues rarely paid by such pundits. He has been teaching and seeing patients at the UCLA Medical Center as well as lecturing and consulting on medical topics throughout the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1998
Sarah Shapiro (Commentary, Dec. 26) writes of her father, Norman Cousins, whose traditional Christmas celebrations were for him a "liberation" from his parents' "Old World ties and Jewish tribal bondage." She, in turn, has reclaimed her Jewishness and congratulates herself that her children will not have to face the once "magical" but later "confused identity" that she experienced. If her family's past is any guide to its future, it would seem that her children's heritage, rather than Christian or Jewish, is rebel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1992
Jan Marshall of the "International Humor Institute" (Palm Latitudes, March 1) appears to be carrying the mantle of her former colleague, Norman Cousins (and boy, are her arms tired!). Applause! Applause! STEVE ALLEN Van Nuys
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm very optimistic," Dr. Helen Caldicott, the anti-nuclear activist turned environmentalist, said during an interview in connection with an awards event in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday. "We don't have to overcome the old conditioning about hating the Commies. People don't hate the environment. Everyone loves nature. So it's easier to say, 'Let's talk.'
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JACK SMITH
At a recent celebration of the late Norman Cousins' life, 15 of his friends, colleagues and relatives recalled him with warmth and admiration and told how his life had touched theirs. Dr. Franklin Murphy, host of the gathering of hundreds in UCLA's Royce Hall, observed that Cousins was "an uncommon man, brilliant of mind and full of compassion for his fellow man" but added, "I would like to take note of his sense of humor.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
"The Art of Healing" by Patricia Ward Biederman (Times, Jan. 13), about the new publication "Vital Signs" by two UCLA graduates who are now medical students, was of special interest. I am pleased to see that "bibliotherapy," as it is known in library circles, was revived by editors Paige and Alloggiamento, and that they received inspiration and support from the late Norman Cousins. Karl Menninger introduced the professional community to bibliotherapy in a 1961 paper, "Reading as Therapy."
NEWS
January 10, 1991
A public memorial service will be held for author-philosopher Norman Cousins at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 17 at UCLA's Royce Hall. Cousins, an adjunct professor of medical humanities at the UCLA School of Medicine, died Nov. 30 after suffering a full cardiac arrest. He was 75. The program at the memorial service will feature a 25-minute documentary on Cousins, as well as eulogies from family and colleagues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1992
Jan Marshall of the "International Humor Institute" (Palm Latitudes, March 1) appears to be carrying the mantle of her former colleague, Norman Cousins (and boy, are her arms tired!). Applause! Applause! STEVE ALLEN Van Nuys
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1985
I'm impressed. It's now a real magazine! I've been reading almost all morning--Steve Allen, John Houseman, Bob Oates, Norman Cousins--saving some articles for later in the week. I hope I finish in time for next Sunday. Jackie Browne Santa Monica
NEWS
December 16, 1990
The article focusing on one aspect of the life of Norman Cousins ("The Positive Influence of Norman Cousins," Dec. 6) mentioned the relationship between Cousins and The Wellness Community. I write this letter to you so that all may know that without Norman Cousins there would be no Wellness Community. Because of Cousins' words and deeds, millions of us learned of the connection between the mind and physical well-being. More personally, his were the words that laid the foundation from which evolved the concept of The Wellness Community, a program that would teach untold numbers of cancer patients to join with their physician and health care team in the fight for recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990
Thirty years ago I was introduced to Norman Cousins, a quintessential iconoclast, by Robert Maynard Hutchins, a quintessential iconoclast. From Cousins, with whom I worked on many sociopolitical projects, I soon learned the importance of being a citizen rather than merely a resident--and the value of responsible dissent: while always loving this great country of ours, always striving to set it right when we think it is going wrong. Our shared obsession was the need to end the nuclear arms race before it ends the human race.
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