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Norman Lebovitz

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SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
Saying, "The networks gave me what I wanted," Norman Lebovitz, the San Diego restaurateur who launched a boycott of two major beer companies as a way of opposing the scrambling of NFL telecasts, announced Thursday that the boycott is over. "The networks assured me and my attorney in private meetings (Wednesday) that there will be no scrambling this season," Lebovitz said. Lebovitz, said he made his decision after talking with brewery executives Thursday.
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SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
Saying, "The networks gave me what I wanted," Norman Lebovitz, the San Diego restaurateur who launched a boycott of two major beer companies as a way of opposing the scrambling of NFL telecasts, announced Thursday that the boycott is over. "The networks assured me and my attorney in private meetings (Wednesday) that there will be no scrambling this season," Lebovitz said. Lebovitz, said he made his decision after talking with brewery executives Thursday.
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SPORTS
September 6, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman Lebovitz, a San Diego restaurateur who describes himself as "just the average fan," was flown to New York Wednesday by one of the NFL's biggest advertisers to meet with network executives about the scrambling of televised games. CBS and NBC later issued statements confirming that plans to scramble NFL broadcasts have been suspended, at least for the foreseeable future.
SPORTS
September 6, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman Lebovitz, a San Diego restaurateur who describes himself as "just the average fan," was flown to New York Wednesday by one of the NFL's biggest advertisers to meet with network executives about the scrambling of televised games. CBS and NBC later issued statements confirming that plans to scramble NFL broadcasts have been suspended, at least for the foreseeable future.
SPORTS
September 24, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a violation of consumers' rights, Rep. Jim Bates (D-San Diego) said Sunday he intends to introduce legislation today that seeks to ban or modify future attempts by the NFL to scramble telecasts. "The NFL and other leagues must offer their service to consumers who are willing to pay for it," Bates said at a San Diego press conference. The NFL and the major networks announced before the start of the season Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 40 owners of sports bars and restaurants met Tuesday night in Hillcrest to discuss strategies for contesting a lawsuit by Home Box Office and fighting the threat by the National Football League to "scramble" its fall telecasts. They emerged from the meeting, which was also attended by eight attorneys, to announce the formation of a new organization, the Assn. for Sports Fans' Rights, which they hope will gain national backing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Furious over efforts by the National Football League to "scramble" its telecasts, owners of several San Diego sports bars said Saturday that, collectively, they plan to protest the move through the courts. "I spoke with my attorney for two hours this afternoon and plan to seek an injunction before the first regular-season game (Sept. 9)," said Norman Lebovitz, who owns Sluggo's, with outlets in Hillcrest, La Jolla and University Towne Centre.
SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying "the networks gave me what I wanted," the San Diego restaurateur who launched a nationwide boycott of two major beer companies as a way of opposing the scrambling of NFL telecasts announced Thursday that the boycott is over. "We feel we've accomplished the goal," Norman Lebovitz said. "The networks assured me and my attorney in private meetings (Wednesday) that there will be no scrambling this season. We're accepting that. It's just that they don't have the courage to say it publicly."
SPORTS
August 31, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking official of one of the NFL's biggest advertisers said Thursday that, after meeting with executives of Anheuser-Busch, Inc., the league had postponed indefinitely its "scrambling" of fall telecasts. Fearing a prolonged national boycott of Anheuser-Busch products, the official said the league and the networks had agreed not to scramble, at least for "the immediate future."
SPORTS
September 5, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of an ongoing national boycott of major commercial sponsors, the NFL announced Tuesday that its decision to scramble its fall telecasts is being reconsidered. Meanwhile, Joel M. Pressman, attorney for San Diego's Norman Lebovitz, who has been leading a nationwide coalition of fans and restaurateurs in the fight against scrambling, said he and his client have been invited to New York for meetings today with "parties involved in the controversy," but he would not elaborate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consider this: Norman Lebovitz, a stumpy La Jollan who made his mark in life selling hot dogs, is invited to New York City to talk about this "scrambling" problem with CBS and NBC. Call it "Mr. Sluggo's Goes to Manhattan," or maybe David versus Goliath. The networks wanted to scramble National Football League games starting Sunday. They sought to limit NFL watchers to those in the stands or to those who tune in only through network affiliates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He describes himself as "just the average fan," but La Jolla restaurateur Norman Lebovitz watched the results of this week's National Football League meeting with the intense interest of someone who can actually influence what league owners say and do. And, to a certain extent, he can.
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