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Norovirus

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BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
A possible outbreak of norovirus that has sickened more than 600 passengers and crew members on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has prompted company officials to cut the trip short, the company said late Sunday. The ship, Explorer of the Seas, is heading back to its home port, Cape Liberty, N.J., two days earlier than anticipated, even after the vessel has undergone sanitation procedures at two ports as passengers grew ill.  In a statement, Royal Caribbean said a spike of "gastrointestinal illness" over the weekend led to ending the cruise early.  "After consultation between our medical team and representatives of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we think the right thing to do is to bring our guests home early, and use the extra time to sanitize the ship even more thoroughly," the company said.  Royal Caribean said its doctors suspected norovirus was behind the outbreak.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
A possible outbreak of norovirus that has sickened more than 600 passengers and crew members on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has prompted company officials to cut the trip short, the company said late Sunday. The ship, Explorer of the Seas, is heading back to its home port, Cape Liberty, N.J., two days earlier than anticipated, even after the vessel has undergone sanitation procedures at two ports as passengers grew ill.  In a statement, Royal Caribbean said a spike of "gastrointestinal illness" over the weekend led to ending the cruise early.  "After consultation between our medical team and representatives of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we think the right thing to do is to bring our guests home early, and use the extra time to sanitize the ship even more thoroughly," the company said.  Royal Caribean said its doctors suspected norovirus was behind the outbreak.
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NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Reports from Bloomberg and the Financial Times say dozens of people became sick after eating last month at Noma in Copenhagen, known for its modern Nordic cuisine and often referred to as "the best restaurant in the world. " Danish food inspectors said 63 diners who ate there from Feb. 12 to 16 were ill with vomiting and diarrhea and a kitchen employee also was sickened.  [ Correction, March 9: An earlier version of this post cited a report stating 63 of a total 78 diners were affected; there were a total of 435 guests.]
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Reports from Bloomberg and the Financial Times say dozens of people became sick after eating last month at Noma in Copenhagen, known for its modern Nordic cuisine and often referred to as "the best restaurant in the world. " Danish food inspectors said 63 diners who ate there from Feb. 12 to 16 were ill with vomiting and diarrhea and a kitchen employee also was sickened.  [ Correction, March 9: An earlier version of this post cited a report stating 63 of a total 78 diners were affected; there were a total of 435 guests.]
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Norovirus took the top spot for infection outbreaks in U.S. hospitals from 2008 to 2009 and was responsible for most department closures as well, a study finds. Researchers looked at 822 survey results from hospitals around the country that reported on outbreak investigations, what triggered them and how they were controlled. In the two years of the study there were 386 outbreak investigations that 289 hospitals reported. Outbreak investigations were most often located in medical or surgical intensive care units, and almost a third took place in locations such as rehab units, emergency departments, skilled nursing facilities and long-term acute care hospitals.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
A reusable grocery bag left in a hotel bathroom caused an outbreak of norovirus-induced diarrhea and nausea that struck nine of 13 members of a girls' soccer team in October, Oregon researchers reported Wednesday. The outbreak also affected many family members after the team returned home. Norovirus is a common, easily spread virus that causes various forms of gastric distress. It is "the perfect human pathogen" because it is highly contagious, rapidly and prolifically spread, produces limited immunity and is only moderately virulent, which allows it to continue spreading, said Dr. Aron J. Hall of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in an editorial accompanying the report in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Stomach illnesses peak in winter -- sometimes spread from person to person, sometimes spread via food handled by a sick person. The reason doesn’t really matter, though, when you feel horrible. And, unlike the flu, there's no vaccine you can take to prevent an infection. Beyond campylobacter, salmonella and E. coli (all bacteriums), one of the most common culprits in food-borne illnesses is norovirus, also known as viral gastroenteritis. It's more commonly called the stomach flu -- though it's not remotely related to the flu. This story from the Allentown Morning Call reports the toll such viruses are taking in one state: "In the first three months of this year, nursing homes in Pennsylvania reported 4,040 norovirus cases — nearly twice as many as those reported in all the nine prior months combined.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Though leafy greens accounted for the most U.S. food-related illnesses, poultry caused the most deaths, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The Atlanta-based agency examined 4,589 food-related disease outbreaks from 1998 to 2008, the first comprehensive study of its kind by the agency. The CDC looked at outbreaks across 17 food categories and found that almost half of all outbreaks originated from leafy greens, which include lettuce and spinach.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noroviruses, the noxious microbes that are the most common source of food poisoning on cruise ships and similar settings, are also a major cause of traveler's diarrhea among people visiting Mexico and Guatemala, researchers from Johns Hopkins University researchers reported this week in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Clark County health officials have determined that norovirus caused a gastrointestinal illness last week in guests at the Monte Carlo hotel-casino in Las Vegas. About 15 people, all local residents, were afflicted after eating at the Monte Carlo. Norovirus, the family of common viruses that have sickened many cruise ship passengers, can be passed by food contamination and person-to-person contact. The source of the outbreak has not been determined.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Though leafy greens accounted for the most U.S. food-related illnesses, poultry caused the most deaths, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The Atlanta-based agency examined 4,589 food-related disease outbreaks from 1998 to 2008, the first comprehensive study of its kind by the agency. The CDC looked at outbreaks across 17 food categories and found that almost half of all outbreaks originated from leafy greens, which include lettuce and spinach.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
A reusable grocery bag left in a hotel bathroom caused an outbreak of norovirus-induced diarrhea and nausea that struck nine of 13 members of a girls' soccer team in October, Oregon researchers reported Wednesday. The outbreak also affected many family members after the team returned home. Norovirus is a common, easily spread virus that causes various forms of gastric distress. It is "the perfect human pathogen" because it is highly contagious, rapidly and prolifically spread, produces limited immunity and is only moderately virulent, which allows it to continue spreading, said Dr. Aron J. Hall of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in an editorial accompanying the report in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Norovirus took the top spot for infection outbreaks in U.S. hospitals from 2008 to 2009 and was responsible for most department closures as well, a study finds. Researchers looked at 822 survey results from hospitals around the country that reported on outbreak investigations, what triggered them and how they were controlled. In the two years of the study there were 386 outbreak investigations that 289 hospitals reported. Outbreak investigations were most often located in medical or surgical intensive care units, and almost a third took place in locations such as rehab units, emergency departments, skilled nursing facilities and long-term acute care hospitals.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Stomach illnesses peak in winter -- sometimes spread from person to person, sometimes spread via food handled by a sick person. The reason doesn’t really matter, though, when you feel horrible. And, unlike the flu, there's no vaccine you can take to prevent an infection. Beyond campylobacter, salmonella and E. coli (all bacteriums), one of the most common culprits in food-borne illnesses is norovirus, also known as viral gastroenteritis. It's more commonly called the stomach flu -- though it's not remotely related to the flu. This story from the Allentown Morning Call reports the toll such viruses are taking in one state: "In the first three months of this year, nursing homes in Pennsylvania reported 4,040 norovirus cases — nearly twice as many as those reported in all the nine prior months combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2008 | Larry Gordon
Los Angeles County public health officials said Tuesday the gastrointestinal virus that has sickened hundreds of students at USC in recent days is the norovirus, which has periodically stricken other campuses, cruise ships and nursing homes across the nation. USC officials said the number of USC students sickened by the virus had risen to 330 by Tuesday, although the rate of increase had slowed so much that campus doctors suggested the worst may be over in the five-day outbreak. -- Larry Gordon
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
The flu may be getting a late start this year, but we haven't escaped virus-induced misery. Noroviruses, which cause gastrointestinal illness, appear to be more widespread and severe than usual this winter, federal health officials say. For those who've succumbed, no explanation is necessary. Those who haven't are lucky. Noroviruses -- actually a group of about 40 strains of virus -- cause intense vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache and fever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2008 | Larry Gordon
Los Angeles County public health officials said Tuesday the gastrointestinal virus that has sickened hundreds of students at USC in recent days is the norovirus, which has periodically stricken other campuses, cruise ships and nursing homes across the nation. USC officials said the number of USC students sickened by the virus had risen to 330 by Tuesday, although the rate of increase had slowed so much that campus doctors suggested the worst may be over in the five-day outbreak. -- Larry Gordon
TRAVEL
February 27, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
In January alone, five cruise-ship sailings experienced outbreaks of gastrointestinal illnesses linked to noroviruses, a group that causes acute bouts of vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms generally subside in a day or two. Outbreaks on ships get lots of attention, but the incidence of norovirus illnesses also is rising in other places and among the general population, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which reported recent outbreaks in nursing homes, schools and hotels.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Clark County health officials have determined that norovirus caused a gastrointestinal illness last week in guests at the Monte Carlo hotel-casino in Las Vegas. About 15 people, all local residents, were afflicted after eating at the Monte Carlo. Norovirus, the family of common viruses that have sickened many cruise ship passengers, can be passed by food contamination and person-to-person contact. The source of the outbreak has not been determined.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noroviruses, the noxious microbes that are the most common source of food poisoning on cruise ships and similar settings, are also a major cause of traveler's diarrhea among people visiting Mexico and Guatemala, researchers from Johns Hopkins University researchers reported this week in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
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