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North Atlantic Treaty Organization

WORLD
June 8, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A tattered tent, shreds of carpet and other scorched debris were all that were left of a favored retreat of Moammar Kadafi just outside the Libyan capital, the aftermath of what appeared to be a NATO bombing run. Was the usually idyllic nature preserve a "command and control" center used by the Libyan military? Or was this an example of NATO attempting to assassinate the longtime Libyan dictator? A NATO official reached in Naples, Italy, late Wednesday emphasized that the Western alliance does not target people for killings, and the official would not confirm that North Atlantic Treaty Organization warplanes had even struck the site Tuesday.
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WORLD
May 21, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A series of NATO airstrikes on Libyan government vessels left ships burned, battered and sunk in three ports Friday as the alliance sought to degrade the ability of Moammar Kadafi's regime to attack from the sea. The strikes came after alliance forces in recent weeks observed Libyan vessels threatening NATO ships and carrying out "indiscriminate mining" in sea lanes off the rebel-held city of Misurata, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization said....
WORLD
May 19, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
NATO's top official said Thursday that the air campaign in Libya had seriously damaged Moammar Kadafi's ability to fight and that continued military and political pressure would "eventually lead to the collapse" of the North African strongman's regime. But two months into its aerial campaign, there are signs of impatience within the alliance because Kadafi has managed to cling to power so long and concern that the confrontation could settle into a protracted stalemate unless NATO ratchets up its operations.
WORLD
April 15, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
The United States, France and Britain said Thursday that they "remained united" in their determination to see Moammar Kadafi relinquish power in Libya, even as a meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Berlin heard a top commander appeal for more ground attack aircraft to bolster the alliance's efforts against Kadafi's forces. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sought to smooth over tensions among NATO members, saying that Kadafi "is testing our determination....
WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Paul Richter, David S. Cloud and Lisa Mascaro, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration will transfer the lead role in enforcing the no-fly zone over Libya to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, but the deal exposed sharp divisions in NATO and means U.S. warplanes will continue flying combat missions against Libyan ground forces, officials said. U.S. and NATO officials said the Brussels-based alliance had agreed to take command of the no-fly zone in coming days to prevent Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's air force from attacking rebels who have been battling his government for five weeks.
WORLD
March 10, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
As attacks by the Libyan government on rebels escalated Thursday, NATO said it was moving more naval ships closer to the North African nation's coastline but backed away from military intervention in the crisis. There was little indication at the opening of a two-day meeting in Brussels of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministers that the U.S. and its NATO allies were seriously contemplating imposing a "no-fly" zone over Libya or providing other military assistance to the rebels, even though the Obama administration and European governments have said for weeks that military options were under consideration.
WORLD
March 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Ken Dilanian and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
On a day when Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's forces again launched withering attacks against rebels using warplanes, tanks and artillery, U.S. officials and foreign diplomats said Wednesday that the carnage hadn't reached a tipping point necessary for a Western military response. Beginning Thursday, NATO defense ministers will meet for two days in Brussels, to determine whether and under what circumstances to impose a no-fly zone to stop Kadafi's air attacks. Some Arab states have backed a no-fly zone, but there is no consensus and such a plan could take some time to implement.
WORLD
October 5, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
An attack by Taliban militants on trucks supplying NATO forces in Afghanistan killed three people on the outskirts of the Pakistani capital early Monday and destroyed at least four fuel tankers, police said. Gunmen opened fire on tankers parked at a truck stop near Islamabad, causing several to burst into flames. In addition to those destroyed, 13 were damaged in the early-morning attack, said Bin Yamin, deputy inspector general of Islamabad police. Yamin said six people were injured in the attack.
WORLD
December 5, 2009 | By Paul Richter
Under strong pressure from the Obama administration, NATO said Friday that its members would add 7,000 soldiers to the 40,000 non-American allied troops already in Afghanistan. The new troop commitment, announced at a meeting of foreign ministers in Brussels, includes about 2,500 soldiers who are already in the Central Asian nation, many of whom were sent for the recent elections and will stay on. Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's secretary-general, told reporters at the alliance's headquarters that at least 25 nations would provide the additional troops next year, "with more to come."
WORLD
September 29, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Stepping into an intensifying debate in Washington, the new head of NATO said Monday that more allied troops are needed in Afghanistan to help train the country's security forces. Anders Fogh Rasmussen, who took over Aug. 1 as NATO's secretary-general, said he agreed with an assessment last month by Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the top American and allied commander in Afghanistan, who emphasized the need to secure Afghan cities. "We have to do more now, if we want to do less later," Rasmussen said during a speech in Washington.
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