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NEWS
October 1, 1989
North Carolina has refused the Ku Klux Klan permission to join an Adopt-a-Highway cleanup program that would have allowed the group to post its name on signs along a stretch of road running through a black neighborhood. Under the program, the state puts up eye-catching, green-and-white road signs naming the group or business that has pledged to clean the adopted stretch of road four times a year. The klan asked for a 3.4-mile stretch of road on U.S.
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NATIONAL
July 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A state judge has ruled that North Carolina's 201-year-old law barring unmarried couples from living together is unconstitutional. The American Civil Liberties Union sued last year to overturn the rarely enforced law on behalf of a former sheriff's dispatcher who says she had to quit her job because she wouldn't marry her live-in boyfriend.
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NEWS
November 15, 1988 | United Press International
Raising the drinking age to 21 does not appear to curtail college students' alcohol intake, researchers reported Monday. Jerry Lotterhos and his colleagues at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., studied effects of North Carolina's 1986 increase in its drinking age by surveying East Carolina students before and after the change. Lotterhos, who reported his findings at a meeting of the American Public Health Assn., surveyed 390 undergraduates in 1986, 300 in 1987 and 346 in 1988.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Mike Easley signed legislation that bans executions of the mentally retarded. Easley, a former prosecutor and state attorney general, agreed to sign the legislation because support from the state district attorney's association and state Atty. Gen. Roy Cooper were "compelling factors." Seventeen other states and the federal government already have some kind of ban on executions of the mentally retarded, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
It was a standard charity pitch: Callers representing the Fraternal Order of Police asked for donations a year ago to send underprivileged children to the circus. The residents of Raleigh responded generously, signing up for 5,000 tickets and spending $54,873. Little did they know that only $7,707 would be turned over to the police group. The rest--86% of the amount collected--went to WRG Enterprises of Sarasota, Fla.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoyle Martin doesn't like it, the steady creep, the constant surge and seep of sex into everyday life. He especially abhors "deviant sex." It's everywhere, he says. Just look at Ellen DeGeneres on the cover of Time magazine, he says with disgust. Why can't homosexuals keep their private lives private? That's what he wants to know. "People ask me if I have any gay friends," said Martin, 69. "I tell them that if I do, I don't know it. And that's the way it ought to be."
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Mike Easley signed legislation that bans executions of the mentally retarded. Easley, a former prosecutor and state attorney general, agreed to sign the legislation because support from the state district attorney's association and state Atty. Gen. Roy Cooper were "compelling factors." Seventeen other states and the federal government already have some kind of ban on executions of the mentally retarded, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A state judge has ruled that North Carolina's 201-year-old law barring unmarried couples from living together is unconstitutional. The American Civil Liberties Union sued last year to overturn the rarely enforced law on behalf of a former sheriff's dispatcher who says she had to quit her job because she wouldn't marry her live-in boyfriend.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2013 | By David Zucchino
RALEIGH, N.C. - Roy Cooper is in a very lonely place. He's a Democratic state attorney general surrounded by conservative Republicans who control North Carolina state government. Now those Republicans have put Cooper in an awkward spot. He has publicly condemned GOP-sponsored laws on voter identification and gay marriage, yet must defend those same laws in court. Further complicating matters, Cooper plans to run for governor in 2016. That has prompted Republican charges that he's more interested in being governor than upholding North Carolina's laws.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Hector Becerra
SANFORD, N.C. - Polls may show President Obama with a fighting chance of winning North Carolina for a second time, which would be a bad omen for Mitt Romney on election night. But sitting in his office in this county seat in central North Carolina, Charles C. Staley, chairman of the Republican Party in Lee County, sees signs of hope for the GOP.  In 2008, Obama narrowly defeated Republican nominee John McCain in the state. But Lee County - where registered Democrats outnumber Republicans - went to McCain.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoyle Martin doesn't like it, the steady creep, the constant surge and seep of sex into everyday life. He especially abhors "deviant sex." It's everywhere, he says. Just look at Ellen DeGeneres on the cover of Time magazine, he says with disgust. Why can't homosexuals keep their private lives private? That's what he wants to know. "People ask me if I have any gay friends," said Martin, 69. "I tell them that if I do, I don't know it. And that's the way it ought to be."
NEWS
October 1, 1989
North Carolina has refused the Ku Klux Klan permission to join an Adopt-a-Highway cleanup program that would have allowed the group to post its name on signs along a stretch of road running through a black neighborhood. Under the program, the state puts up eye-catching, green-and-white road signs naming the group or business that has pledged to clean the adopted stretch of road four times a year. The klan asked for a 3.4-mile stretch of road on U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | United Press International
Raising the drinking age to 21 does not appear to curtail college students' alcohol intake, researchers reported Monday. Jerry Lotterhos and his colleagues at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., studied effects of North Carolina's 1986 increase in its drinking age by surveying East Carolina students before and after the change. Lotterhos, who reported his findings at a meeting of the American Public Health Assn., surveyed 390 undergraduates in 1986, 300 in 1987 and 346 in 1988.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
It was a standard charity pitch: Callers representing the Fraternal Order of Police asked for donations a year ago to send underprivileged children to the circus. The residents of Raleigh responded generously, signing up for 5,000 tickets and spending $54,873. Little did they know that only $7,707 would be turned over to the police group. The rest--86% of the amount collected--went to WRG Enterprises of Sarasota, Fla.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2006 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for a Duke University student arrested on suspicion of raping an exotic dancer demanded Monday that Dist. Atty. Mike Nifong be taken off the case, alleging in court documents that the Durham, N.C., prosecutor ignored key evidence "in his zeal to make national headlines and win a hotly contested primary." But Nifong's supporters argued that the motion seemed motivated as much by politics as by law, coming on the eve of Nifong's bid for election to a post he was appointed to last year.
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