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BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
North Korea has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on its ill-fated rocket program, but when it came time to give its website a facelift, the country decided to go the thrifty route. It turns out that North Korea's revamped website is based on a design template created by a California Web designer that sells on themeforest.com for a mere $15. But just because it was cheap doesn't mean it's not pretty. In fact, we'd say the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK)
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WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Steven Borowiec
SEOUL - - North Korea test-launched two medium-range ballistic missiles early Wednesday in violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions, officials said. The South Korean military said the missiles were launched just after 2:30 a.m. and flew for a little more than 400 miles. The U.S. State Department said the two missiles flew "over North Korea's land mass and impacted in the Sea of Japan. " It appeared that North Korea did not issue maritime warnings about the launches, the department said.
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NEWS
September 1, 2009
LOS ANGELES, Calif., Sept. 1, 2009 -- The Los Angeles Times today announced the publication of Laura Ling and Euna Lee's first-hand account of the story that took them to the North Korean-Chinese border and the events leading up to their detention in a North Korean prison. The lengthy Op-Ed article will be published on latimes.com tonight and in The Times Wednesday, Sept. 2nd print edition, as well as made available to other publications tomorrow via the LA Times- Washington Post news service.
OPINION
March 19, 2014
Re "North Korea 2014 meets Rome AD 65," Opinion, March 14 One further parallel between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Rome's Nero is that both of them are infamous for their persecution and slaughter of Christians. This fact doesn't outrage many in our "polite society" who seem so willing to ignore it. James Stickley Pomona ALSO: Letters: Bringing an L.A. park back to life Letters: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a justice for all Letters: Common Core is about teaching students to think
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By David Horsey
Kim Jong Un is an absurdly comical figure. If he were not holding the fate of millions of people in his hands, the North Korean dictator would provide us all with nothing but laughs.  He runs a country that, thanks to the ruinous communist policies of his father and grandfather, is an economic basket case where mass starvation is always as close as tomorrow. He has almost no friends in the world, except for the similarly outcast nutcases that run Iran. His closest allies, the Chinese, are so disgusted with him that they have signed on to United Nations sanctions against his country.
WORLD
February 24, 2008 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Not since 1950 when the U.S. Army briefly captured Pyongyang during the Korean War have so many Americans descended on the world's most reclusive, anti-U.S. capital. This time, though, the invasion is not military, but musical. A 747 jumbo jet from Beijing is scheduled to arrive Monday in Pyongyang carrying a full symphony orchestra -- 130 members of the New York Philharmonic and their instruments, minus only the piano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
As a beloved ex-President, Ronald Reagan almost always gets what he wants these days. But this week, one of Reagan's personal wishes was blocked by a federal convict with a typewriter. Last Friday, Reagan personally telephoned the National Park Service in Washington to add his support to proposed national historic landmark status for a mitten-shaped hill in the Santa Monica Mountains that includes prized Chumash Indian cave paintings. But on Monday, when the Park Service's advisory board met, it concluded that its hands were tied.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
YANJI, China - After the North Korean coal mine where she worked stopped paying salaries, Park Kyung Ok tried her hand at business. Buttons and zippers, candy and dried squid, fabric, plastic tarpaulins, men's suits and cigarettes. "I sold just about everything," said Park, 44. But it wasn't until she started hawking methamphetamine in 2007, she said, that she was able to earn a living. Methamphetamine, known as orum, or "ice," is a rare commodity manufactured and sold in North Korea, where most factories sit idle, the equipment rusted or looted.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Sometimes - as with North Korea and its despot of the moment, Kim Jong Un - I hate to admit it, but I miss the good/bad old days when we could just threaten to bomb someone back into the Stone Age to solve problems. The U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea released a 400-page report Monday detailing just how bad things are there ; here's the laundry list: “These crimes against humanity entail extermination, murder, enslavement, torture, imprisonment, rape, forced abortions and other sexual violence, persecution on political, religious, racial and gender grounds, the forcible transfer of populations, the enforced disappearance of persons and the inhumane act of knowingly causing prolonged starvation.” Which pretty much says it all, though, as Julie Makinen reported for The Times, the report further noted: “the 'gravity, scale and nature of the violations' in the totalitarian state over several decades do not have 'any parallel in the contemporary world.' ” Then reality set in: Makinen's story goes on to quote the chairman of the panel established by the U.N. Human Rights Council, retired Australian chief justice Michael Kirby, who said the findings reminded him of the extensive horrors committed by Nazi Germany and other Axis powers and fully revealed only at the end of World War II. “I hope the international community will be moved by the detail" in the report, Kirby said.
OPINION
April 3, 2013
Re "Reaching out to Pyongyang," Opinion, April 1 I am not a trained diplomat or a politician, but as one who is preparing for his fourth invited visit to Pyongyang since 2009, I have come to appreciate the value of one-on-one discussions with the North Koreans that Donald Gregg is advocating. Each time I leave, I am told: "We are aware of the tensions between your country and ours, and yet you dare to come. You are always welcome here. " In 2012 I was able to take to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea a delegation of American magicians as the first step in a hoped-for people-to-people exchange.
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By James Romm
This week, as the Ides of March approaches - the March 15 anniversary of the assassination of Julius Caesar, a determined but ultimately fruitless attempt by Roman senators to stop their government from sliding toward dictatorship - the minds of some ancient historians may turn in a seemingly unlikely direction: toward modern North Korea. The dark and menacing regime of Kim Jong Un seems a long way off from the Augustan "Golden Age" of ancient Rome, an era that produced art and literature still admired today.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
North Korea appears to be missing in an image taken from space. NASA says of the nighttime image, taken from the International Space Station: "North Korea is almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea and China. The darkened land appears as if it were a patch of water joining the Yellow Sea to the Sea of Japan. " Capital city Pyongyang has a population of more than 3 million, yet is a tiny island of light. The dictator-ruled nation is in the dark in more ways than one. Electricity is sporadic and unreliable, with those who have it often receiving power only a few hours a day, according to U.S. News & World Report.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Many people haven't known what to make of former NBA player Dennis Rodman's bizarre diplomatic efforts in North Korea, but 20th Century Fox may have found an answer: a big-screen comedy. The studio has bought the pitch for "Diplomats," a movie inspired by Rodman's "basketball diplomacy" efforts in the rogue nation, to be helmed by "Ride Along" director Tim Story, according to the Hollywood Reporter . The film is described as "a two-hander that takes its cues from the antics of the 6-foot-7 former NBA player.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - For decades, former eight-term Bay Area Rep. Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey Jr. has dreamed of a Korean War battle moment he cannot shake: Peering into a trench he sees the terrified faces of his teenage opponents, clutching wicker baskets full of grenades. He empties his weapon. Last week, at 86, he at last had an opportunity for personal reconciliation. As a member of a small delegation led by Donald Gregg, a former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, McCloskey traveled to Pyongyang with a singular intention.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Torture, deliberate starvation and other abuses carried out by North Korean authorities - possibly on the orders of leader Kim Jong Un - are crimes against humanity and should be referred to an international court or tribunal for prosecution, United Nations investigators said Monday. A 400-page report catalogs practices long cited by defectors and human rights activists, but their inclusion in a comprehensive document compiled by a U.N.-appointed panel appears to be unprecedented.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Sometimes - as with North Korea and its despot of the moment, Kim Jong Un - I hate to admit it, but I miss the good/bad old days when we could just threaten to bomb someone back into the Stone Age to solve problems. The U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea released a 400-page report Monday detailing just how bad things are there ; here's the laundry list: “These crimes against humanity entail extermination, murder, enslavement, torture, imprisonment, rape, forced abortions and other sexual violence, persecution on political, religious, racial and gender grounds, the forcible transfer of populations, the enforced disappearance of persons and the inhumane act of knowingly causing prolonged starvation.” Which pretty much says it all, though, as Julie Makinen reported for The Times, the report further noted: “the 'gravity, scale and nature of the violations' in the totalitarian state over several decades do not have 'any parallel in the contemporary world.' ” Then reality set in: Makinen's story goes on to quote the chairman of the panel established by the U.N. Human Rights Council, retired Australian chief justice Michael Kirby, who said the findings reminded him of the extensive horrors committed by Nazi Germany and other Axis powers and fully revealed only at the end of World War II. “I hope the international community will be moved by the detail" in the report, Kirby said.
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By James Romm
This week, as the Ides of March approaches - the March 15 anniversary of the assassination of Julius Caesar, a determined but ultimately fruitless attempt by Roman senators to stop their government from sliding toward dictatorship - the minds of some ancient historians may turn in a seemingly unlikely direction: toward modern North Korea. The dark and menacing regime of Kim Jong Un seems a long way off from the Augustan "Golden Age" of ancient Rome, an era that produced art and literature still admired today.
SPORTS
April 10, 2010
World Cup 2010: NORTH KOREA FIFA ranking: 105 Overall World Cup record: 1-2-1 Coach: Kim Jong-Hun Best performance: Quarterfinals, 1966 Overview: Making their first appearance in the World Cup finals in 44 years, the North Koreans face long odds in South Africa, where they are included with Brazil, Portugal and the Ivory Coast in the so-called "group of death" in the first round. Although the North Koreans are big and fast, they are painfully short on international experience, fielding a roster made up almost entirely of players from domestic leagues.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Steven Borowiec
SEOUL -- A left-wing South Korean lawmaker was sentenced to 12 years in prison Monday on charges of treason and praising North Korea, the first such conviction of a legislator since the South transitioned to democracy in the late 1980s. Prosecutors had sought a 20-year term for Lee Seok-ki of the small, leftist Unified Progressive Party. He and six fellow party members were arrested last year after they held a meeting in which they allegedly discussed ways to help the North defeat the South in the event of a war between the two Koreas.
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