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North Korea Culture

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December 17, 2007 | Anne Gearan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- China had its pingpong players, the Soviet Union its ballet dancers, Iran its soccer players. Now the New York Philharmonic is making a musical overture to North Korea. Arts and sports can open doors abroad that diplomatic jawboning might not, although the record is mixed. The Philharmonic will perform Feb. 26 in one of the most closed societies in the world, a Stalinist nation whose leader rules by decree and is accused of starving and torturing his people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2007 | Anne Gearan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- China had its pingpong players, the Soviet Union its ballet dancers, Iran its soccer players. Now the New York Philharmonic is making a musical overture to North Korea. Arts and sports can open doors abroad that diplomatic jawboning might not, although the record is mixed. The Philharmonic will perform Feb. 26 in one of the most closed societies in the world, a Stalinist nation whose leader rules by decree and is accused of starving and torturing his people.
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NEWS
October 25, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The hulking 105-story Ryugyong Hotel dominating this capital city's skyline is a fitting metaphor for a crippled nation. The massive concrete pyramid, topped by several tiers of would-be revolving restaurants, stands unfinished. Years after construction came to an abrupt halt, cranes still hover nearby like a giant's fishing rods.
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The hulking 105-story Ryugyong Hotel dominating this capital city's skyline is a fitting metaphor for a crippled nation. The massive concrete pyramid, topped by several tiers of would-be revolving restaurants, stands unfinished. Years after construction came to an abrupt halt, cranes still hover nearby like a giant's fishing rods.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made Tuesday when the United Nations admitted North and South Korea as full voting members, ending a 40-year Cold War stalemate over the issue. But that does not mean the two countries have begun to end their differences, politically or artistically.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In North Korea, the sacred Mt. Paekdu mourned for Kim Il Sung, the dictator who ruled the country from 1948 until he died July 8. A double rainbow signaled his death. Paying tribute, swallows hovered above statues of him scattered throughout the country.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
It started innocently enough. Two journalists, an American and a Japanese, walked into an attractive noodle shop, filled with Korean customers, a few blocks from an area of grand sports stadiums and new hotels filled with visitors to the 13th World Festival of Youth and Students. The restaurant's windows bore posters of the festival, and the ceiling was strung with small flags of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. It was spotlessly clean and freshly painted. Customers were well dressed.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Kim Chan Bok, a 39-year-old homemaker, tailor and mother of three, lives with her family in a tiny tile-roofed home, painted white with blue trim, in the satellite town of Ryongsong, about 10 miles outside of central Pyongyang. Kim's husband and father both are construction workers.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | SHEILA McNULTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With revolutionary opera booming from the speakers in the Kim Il Sung Stadium, thousands of 6-year-olds performed synchronized splits, cartwheels and back flips in perfect formation. When the music stopped, the children shouted, "We miss the smile of the Great Leader," and began crying. The crowd of 100,000 North Koreans applauded loudly as the youngsters raced from the field, wiping tears from their cheeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
When the Belgian filmmaker Anja Daelemans and the British-born documentarian Nicholas Bonner resolved six years ago to collaborate, they decided to add an unusual challenge: make a movie in and about North Korea. It was, the filmmakers agreed, a wild idea. "A bottle of whiskey was involved," said Bonner, only half-joking. After all, no Western-financed movie had ever been produced inside North Korea. And no film shot inside the country had ever been edited outside it, as the pair wanted to do. North Korea's repressive government - which had occasionally collaborated with China and the former Soviet Union on films, and once co-produced a movie with South Korea - had always refused to work with any entity from a Western European or English-speaking country.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | SHEILA McNULTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With revolutionary opera booming from the speakers in the Kim Il Sung Stadium, thousands of 6-year-olds performed synchronized splits, cartwheels and back flips in perfect formation. When the music stopped, the children shouted, "We miss the smile of the Great Leader," and began crying. The crowd of 100,000 North Koreans applauded loudly as the youngsters raced from the field, wiping tears from their cheeks.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In North Korea, the sacred Mt. Paekdu mourned for Kim Il Sung, the dictator who ruled the country from 1948 until he died July 8. A double rainbow signaled his death. Paying tribute, swallows hovered above statues of him scattered throughout the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made Tuesday when the United Nations admitted North and South Korea as full voting members, ending a 40-year Cold War stalemate over the issue. But that does not mean the two countries have begun to end their differences, politically or artistically.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
It started innocently enough. Two journalists, an American and a Japanese, walked into an attractive noodle shop, filled with Korean customers, a few blocks from an area of grand sports stadiums and new hotels filled with visitors to the 13th World Festival of Youth and Students. The restaurant's windows bore posters of the festival, and the ceiling was strung with small flags of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. It was spotlessly clean and freshly painted. Customers were well dressed.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Kim Chan Bok, a 39-year-old homemaker, tailor and mother of three, lives with her family in a tiny tile-roofed home, painted white with blue trim, in the satellite town of Ryongsong, about 10 miles outside of central Pyongyang. Kim's husband and father both are construction workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
To obtain material for her latest documentary -- a look inside North Korea's secretive culture -- Lisa Ling went undercover last June, posing as a medical coordinator documenting the work of a Nepalese eye surgeon who was allowed in the country on a rare humanitarian mission. Ling, a correspondent for National Geographic Channel's "Explorer," gave officials her real name and nationality but did not reveal that she was a journalist.
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