Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNorth Korea Foreign Relations South Korea
IN THE NEWS

North Korea Foreign Relations South Korea

NEWS
June 15, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. advocates of a robust national missile defense system, the images emanating from the historic Korean summit spell trouble. Photos and TV footage from the summit show a smiling, relaxed North Korean leader, Kim Jong Il, hosting his South Korean counterpart, Kim Dae Jung. More important, they depict the reclusive Communist ruler acting in an apparently rational manner.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
In his first known foreign trip in 17 years, North Korean ruler Kim Jong Il conferred with Chinese leaders about his upcoming summit with South Korea during a three-day secret visit to Beijing, a diplomat said today. The visit was believed to be the highest-level exchange between the two communist countries in at least six years and marked North Korea's reaching out to its once-close ally.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mineral water from North Korea's famed Mt. Kumgang hit South Korean store shelves this month. But it was a long trip. Since the idea was conceived in 1994, a Seoul firm has been arm-twisted by the North Koreans into building a $6-million local railroad line and has seen the project delayed a year by an electricity shortage. "If it had been up to me, I never would have made the decision to enter North Korea," said Oh Byung Kwon, executive director of Taechang Co., the Seoul firm.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last December, North Korea's chronic energy shortages became so severe that the lights and heat began to go off in Pyongyang, the capital. It was those winter power outages, Clinton administration officials believe, that finally drove North Korean leader Kim Jong Il to pursue the historic opening with South Korea that the world witnessed this week.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Monday lifted an array of economic sanctions against North Korea in one of the most far-reaching steps the U.S. government has taken toward ending half a century of hostility between the two nations. But the isolated Communist state's desperate economic straits will limit any significant commerce with the United States in the near future, experts on Asian commerce and North Korea said.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In ceremonies today that were significantly scaled back after fledgling signs of rapprochement with North Korea, thousands of aging South Korean and U.S. veterans here marked the 50th anniversary of the onset of the war that permanently split the Korean peninsula and left millions of people dead.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North and South Korean governments each announced today that South Korean President Kim Dae Jung will travel to Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, for a first-ever summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il from June 12-14. If it comes to pass--and analysts counseled caution in assuming that it will--the summit would be the first meeting between top South and North Korean leaders since the peninsula was divided in 1945.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korea might not have much electricity, food, clothing or fertilizer. But it does have its pride, and that in great abundance. This has been amply demonstrated in three days of inter-Korean family reunions that wrapped up today. Although North Koreans are in desperate need of almost everything, the Pyongyang regime has insisted that the total value of any gifts given by South Koreans to northern relatives be limited to $500.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, accepting his Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, promised to devote the rest of his life to peace, democracy and reconciliation with North Korea. The prize was given to Kim, 76, for his lifetime of work for democracy and human rights and for his efforts to reconcile the two Koreas, which have been uneasy neighbors since the 1950-53 Korean War. His achievements included a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in June.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North and South Korean officials will meet later this month to discuss establishment of a military hotline and the first exchanges between the two nations' armed forces, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung revealed Tuesday. In a far-ranging interview, Kim predicted that North Korea will inevitably be forced to open up its isolated economy but said reunification of the two Koreas could take 20 to 30 years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|