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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Mikhail S. Gorbachev succeeded in South Korea where he failed in Japan, winning agreements Saturday for economic cooperation and joint development of Soviet natural resources. The Soviet leader also got President Roh Tae Woo to agree to study the possibility of a friendship treaty between the Soviet Union and South Korea, and Gorbachev promised to help efforts to reduce tensions on the divided Korean Peninsula.
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NEWS
March 29, 1988
The Soviet Union and North Korea have begun joint naval exercises for the first time, according to Adm. David E. Jeremiah, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. In a Pentagon briefing, Jeremiah said the Soviets and North Koreans have long held joint maneuvers along their border but that this is "the first time I can recall seeing them operating at sea in a common exercise." North Korea's navy is relatively small, consisting of two frigates, 20 submarines and seven mini-submarines.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
SPORTS
September 15, 1987
The United States has asked the Soviet Union to use its influence to get North Korea to accept South Korea's offer of some 1988 Olympic Games events, a South Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said. The spokesman quoted Assistant Secretary of State Gaston Sigur as telling South Korean Foreign Minister Choi Kwang-soo that the request was made during his talks with Soviet officials last week in Moscow.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held a brief but historic meeting with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo here Monday, and Roh later predicted that it will lead to diplomatic relations and wider economic cooperation--and perhaps eventually to reunification of the Korean Peninsula. "Now that German reunification is becoming a reality, Korea is the only nation on earth that still is divided by Cold War politics," Roh told a press conference after his hourlong talk with Gorbachev.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
North Korea reacted with anger Friday to news that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet Roh Tae Woo, president of its hated rival, South Korea. A Foreign Ministry spokesman, quoted by the official North Korean news agency, said the meeting Monday in San Francisco will have "a serious political consequence" for the future of divided Korea.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Both the Soviet Union and China have given assurances that North Korea will not attempt any terrorist action to disturb the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Saturday. "The Soviets have told us flatly that in their view, the North Koreans will not make any effort to disturb the Olympics," the secretary told reporters aboard his plane Saturday during a flight from Beijing to Seoul. These guarantees came directly from Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Korea's state news agency carried a blistering attack on Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev for his "unpardonable, traitorous bargaining" with the leader of hated South Korea. The Soviet leader met with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo on Monday in San Francisco, during which they agreed to move toward diplomatic ties. The report denounced Roh's "flunkyist, submissive and traitorous trip which has the existence of (South Korea) and the future destiny of the country in danger."
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's special envoy, Igor Rogachev, arrived in Seoul and said Moscow is willing to act as peacemaker between bitter enemies North and South Korea. Rogachev, the highest-ranking Soviet Foreign Ministry official to visit Seoul, said he hopes the two Koreas will continue peaceful discussions.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea and the Soviet Union, celebrating their establishment of diplomatic relations after years of animosity, pledged Friday to work together toward the eventual reunification of Korea and the reduction of tension in Asia. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said that his country's new relationship with the Soviet Union, long the patron of rival North Korea, marked "the end of an era that brought about unspeakable trauma to mankind and the unnatural division of nations and peoples."
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Korea's state news agency carried a blistering attack on Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev for his "unpardonable, traitorous bargaining" with the leader of hated South Korea. The Soviet leader met with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo on Monday in San Francisco, during which they agreed to move toward diplomatic ties. The report denounced Roh's "flunkyist, submissive and traitorous trip which has the existence of (South Korea) and the future destiny of the country in danger."
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The negotiations were so secretive and sensitive that Seoul's Blue House, the office of South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, kept its own Foreign Ministry in the dark, and U.S. and South Korean officials both agreed not to tell the Japanese. At one crucial point, Anatoly F. Dobrynin, the former Soviet ambassador to the United States, was sent from Moscow to Seoul to continue the high-level, clandestine diplomacy. Monday's historic meeting between Roh and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held a brief but historic meeting with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo here Monday, and Roh later predicted that it will lead to diplomatic relations and wider economic cooperation--and perhaps eventually to reunification of the Korean Peninsula. "Now that German reunification is becoming a reality, Korea is the only nation on earth that still is divided by Cold War politics," Roh told a press conference after his hourlong talk with Gorbachev.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
North Korea reacted with anger Friday to news that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet Roh Tae Woo, president of its hated rival, South Korea. A Foreign Ministry spokesman, quoted by the official North Korean news agency, said the meeting Monday in San Francisco will have "a serious political consequence" for the future of divided Korea.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's special envoy, Igor Rogachev, arrived in Seoul and said Moscow is willing to act as peacemaker between bitter enemies North and South Korea. Rogachev, the highest-ranking Soviet Foreign Ministry official to visit Seoul, said he hopes the two Koreas will continue peaceful discussions.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea and the Soviet Union, celebrating their establishment of diplomatic relations after years of animosity, pledged Friday to work together toward the eventual reunification of Korea and the reduction of tension in Asia. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said that his country's new relationship with the Soviet Union, long the patron of rival North Korea, marked "the end of an era that brought about unspeakable trauma to mankind and the unnatural division of nations and peoples."
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said Thursday that his talks next week with Mikhail S. Gorbachev will be aimed at helping to end hostility on the divided Korean Peninsula. Roh is scheduled to leave Sunday and meet with the Soviet president in San Francisco on Monday after Gorbachev ends summit talks with President Bush. Afterward, Roh is to meet Bush in Washington on Wednesday, the Yonhap news agency reported.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented event that will dramatize the far-reaching changes taking place among the nations of East Asia, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo in San Francisco, U.S. officials and other sources said Wednesday.
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