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North Korea Travel Restrictions South Korea

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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon said South Korea will propose that families separated on the divided Korean peninsula be allowed to have temporary reunions. Kang said the exchanges could begin around Chusok, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, which falls on Oct. 3. It would be the second time that the hostile nations have allowed separated families to visit each other. There are about 10 million members of families separated by the division of the peninsula in 1945.
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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon said South Korea will propose that families separated on the divided Korean peninsula be allowed to have temporary reunions. Kang said the exchanges could begin around Chusok, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, which falls on Oct. 3. It would be the second time that the hostile nations have allowed separated families to visit each other. There are about 10 million members of families separated by the division of the peninsula in 1945.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Communist North Korea proposed talks with South Korea on allowing free travel between the rival countries, but South Korea rejected the idea. The proposal was made in letters delivered in the border village of Panmunjom and addressed to South Korea's president, prime minister and three main opposition leaders. According to South Korean officials, North Korea repeated a proposal that the two Koreas hold "top-level political talks" to discuss free travel on the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Communist North Korea proposed talks with South Korea on allowing free travel between the rival countries, but South Korea rejected the idea. The proposal was made in letters delivered in the border village of Panmunjom and addressed to South Korea's president, prime minister and three main opposition leaders. According to South Korean officials, North Korea repeated a proposal that the two Koreas hold "top-level political talks" to discuss free travel on the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan for a reunion of Koreans separated by war and partition was rejected Monday. At a meeting in Panmunjom, in the demilitarized zone, the North Koreans insisted that Communist artists be permitted to put on four performances of a propaganda opera at the reunion planned for Dec. 8-11. All four performances were to be shown on South Korean television. South Korea's chief Red Cross representative, Song Yong Dae, rejected the demand.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Radical students protesting a South Korean government ban on travel to North Korea clashed violently with police Saturday, and President Roh Tae Woo ordered a crackdown on student leaders. At Seoul's Hanyang University, the 24-hour siege of a classroom building ended after hundreds of students wielding metal pipes and clubs fled down a hillside through a police blockade. Some were arrested and others surrendered.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan for a reunion of Koreans separated by war and partition was rejected Monday. At a meeting in Panmunjom, in the demilitarized zone, the North Koreans insisted that Communist artists be permitted to put on four performances of a propaganda opera at the reunion planned for Dec. 8-11. All four performances were to be shown on South Korean television. South Korea's chief Red Cross representative, Song Yong Dae, rejected the demand.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Radical students protesting a South Korean government ban on travel to North Korea clashed violently with police Saturday, and President Roh Tae Woo ordered a crackdown on student leaders. At Seoul's Hanyang University, the 24-hour siege of a classroom building ended after hundreds of students wielding metal pipes and clubs fled down a hillside through a police blockade. Some were arrested and others surrendered.
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