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NEWS
January 10, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could renew old North-South battles over highway funding, Assembly Speaker Willie Brown said Tuesday that he may seek more revenue from a proposed gas tax increase for Northern California highways and mass transit. The San Francisco Democrat, speaking off the cuff after a California Teachers Assn. rally, said that as the revenue split is proposed, it appears the North would be shortchanged on these priority projects.
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NEWS
February 3, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Researchers at UC Davis have taken on the challenge of coaxing drivers out of their personal cars and into a new fleet of shared sedans in the largest such experiment in the nation. Car-pooling with groups of passengers to and from work or school is well known in the United States. But car sharing--in which drivers make reservations to use the same vehicles at different times of the day or week--is relatively unknown here. It is quite popular in Europe.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 200 people told the Golden Gate Bridge District Board that they don't want the bridge toll raised to $3. The hearing this week was the last of three on the proposed $1 increase and, unlike earlier hearings in San Francisco and Santa Rosa, little was heard in support of the proposal. The district said it needs to raise more money for seismic improvements to the bridge and to help cover an estimated $14-million operating deficit. The district is expected to vote on the toll increase May 31.
NEWS
May 26, 1997 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Differences between north and south over seismic safety repairs to the state's toll bridges--which are concentrated heavily in the San Francisco Bay Area--have rumbled through the Capitol's hallways for years, at times threatening serious eruption. This year is shaping up as another possible Krakatoa.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County emerged the big winner Friday when Gov. George Deukmejian announced that it would receive two new private toll roads as part of a unprecedented effort in which entrepreneurs would be allowed to build and operate $2.5 billion worth of private expressways around the state. One of the Orange County proposals, made by a consortium headed by Texas computer magnate H. Ross Perot, is to build an 11.2-mile, $700-million elevated toll road in the middle of the Santa Ana River flood plain.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic aftershocks of the collapse of the Cypress freeway in the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake are still being felt, according to a report to be issued Monday by transportation and economic experts. The report calculates the closure of the 1 1/2-mile freeway, which linked downtown Oakland with the San Francisco Bay Bridge, has cost $22.5 million to date in added travel times for motorists, higher vehicle operating costs and delays in shipments of products.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At a local supermarket--not far from where the mall had collapsed in Tuesday's earthquake and two had died--a quiet line of anxious shoppers stretched for several blocks Wednesday, waiting as long as three hours to stock up on candles, flashlight batteries and canned goods. Max Spitzer, the manager of a neighborhood video store, said that to prevent hoarding, supermarket clerks were taking the shoppers' lists and doing their marketing for them. "It's cash only," he said.
NEWS
October 21, 1989
Developments in the quake: The Damage The state Office of Emergency Services now estimates damage at more than $4.2 billion, including about $1 billion to state highways and bridges. U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston's office estimates total damage at $6.85 billion, including $2.5 billion in San Francisco alone. The OES estimates 159 houses and 295 apartments with major damage, 2,214 houses and 1,928 apartments with minor damage. Hundreds of buildings were damaged or destroyed, some by aftershocks.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nudging the state a step closer to an era of toll roads, Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday unveiled plans to allow entrepreneurs to build $2.5 billion worth of private expressways in Orange and San Diego counties and the fast-growing suburban counties east of Oakland.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
California's main north-south route reopened Saturday, one week after floodwaters tore away a bridge, killing seven people whose cars plunged into a rain-swollen creek. The temporary bridge on Interstate 5 opened at 4:45 a.m., said Al Vasquez of the California Highway Patrol. Motorists were instructed to slow to 35 m.p.h. while driving on the two-lane bridge. Big rigs with oversize and overweight permit loads were detoured.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
California's main north-south route reopened Saturday, one week after floodwaters tore away a bridge, killing seven people whose cars plunged into a rain-swollen creek. The temporary bridge on Interstate 5 opened at 4:45 a.m., said Al Vasquez of the California Highway Patrol. Motorists were instructed to slow to 35 m.p.h. while driving on the two-lane bridge. Big rigs with oversize and overweight permit loads were detoured.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 200 people told the Golden Gate Bridge District Board that they don't want the bridge toll raised to $3. The hearing this week was the last of three on the proposed $1 increase and, unlike earlier hearings in San Francisco and Santa Rosa, little was heard in support of the proposal. The district said it needs to raise more money for seismic improvements to the bridge and to help cover an estimated $14-million operating deficit. The district is expected to vote on the toll increase May 31.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic aftershocks of the collapse of the Cypress freeway in the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake are still being felt, according to a report to be issued Monday by transportation and economic experts. The report calculates the closure of the 1 1/2-mile freeway, which linked downtown Oakland with the San Francisco Bay Bridge, has cost $22.5 million to date in added travel times for motorists, higher vehicle operating costs and delays in shipments of products.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County emerged the big winner Friday when Gov. George Deukmejian announced that it would receive two new private toll roads as part of a unprecedented effort in which entrepreneurs would be allowed to build and operate $2.5 billion worth of private expressways around the state. One of the Orange County proposals, made by a consortium headed by Texas computer magnate H. Ross Perot, is to build an 11.2-mile, $700-million elevated toll road in the middle of the Santa Ana River flood plain.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nudging the state a step closer to an era of toll roads, Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday unveiled plans to allow entrepreneurs to build $2.5 billion worth of private expressways in Orange and San Diego counties and the fast-growing suburban counties east of Oakland.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could renew old North-South battles over highway funding, Assembly Speaker Willie Brown said Tuesday that he may seek more revenue from a proposed gas tax increase for Northern California highways and mass transit. The San Francisco Democrat, speaking off the cuff after a California Teachers Assn. rally, said that as the revenue split is proposed, it appears the North would be shortchanged on these priority projects.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | LILY ENG and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bay Area residents preparing for Monday's return to the workaday world are faced with a battered, jerry-built transportation network that could coerce these Californians, at least, to do something that has been recommended for years: car-pooling.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attention, bureaucrats. Bolinas has made itself heard: It wants to make itself scarce. In an overwhelming rejection of tourists, Caltrans and, perhaps, common sense, the 418 voters of the blissfully obscure Marin County village about 20 miles north of San Francisco voted nearly 3 to 1 Tuesday against allowing road signs directing travelers into town.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caltrans Director Robert K. Best on Wednesday said it will cost about $1.5 billion to rebuild state and local roads damaged in the Bay Area earthquake and outlined a proposal to compensate victims of the Nimitz Freeway collapse. Best, testifying before a special hearing of the state Senate Transportation Committee, said the federal government will cover at least half and probably more of the state's rebuilding expenses.
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