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December 29, 1985
Police said they arrested 18 Irish nationalists in house-to-house raids in more than five cities in Northern Ireland and confiscated documents and tape recordings as part of an investigation into serious crimes.
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WORLD
January 12, 2010 | By Henry Chu
Northern Ireland's top leader announced Monday that he was stepping down temporarily amid an explosive scandal over his wife's affair with a teenager and allegations of an ethical lapse of his own in connection with the relationship. Peter Robinson, Northern Ireland's first minister, said he was giving up his post for six weeks to concentrate on clearing his name and on caring for his wife, Iris, an influential lawmaker whose spectacular fall from grace has rocked the British province's political scene.
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NEWS
December 5, 2000 | Associated Press
John Hume, a Nobel peace laureate and Northern Ireland's senior Roman Catholic statesman, resigned Monday from the province's cross-community legislature, citing his overload of work and shaky health. Hume, 63, said several months ago that he planned to step down as a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a central institution forged under terms of the province's 1998 peace accord.
WORLD
January 11, 2010 | By Henry Chu
The threat of renewed sectarian violence is at its highest in years. But it's a seamy affair between Northern Ireland's most famous female politician and a man nearly 40 years her junior that has put the province's fragile peace pact between Roman Catholics and Protestants in danger of unraveling. The woman in question is Iris Robinson, 60, the glamorous wife of the leader of Northern Ireland and a canny lawmaker in her own right. For months, she maintained a sexual relationship with a 19-year-old, then allegedly helped set him up in business with money secretly lent her by a pair of property developers.
WORLD
September 17, 2004 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
In a bid to restore power-sharing between Roman Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland two years after the process collapsed, Prime Ministers Tony Blair of Britain and Bertie Ahern of Ireland opened a round of talks Thursday in southern England. The discussions at Leeds Castle in Kent are aimed at ending the deadlock that has frozen the peace process in Northern Ireland since the breakdown of the British territory's joint assembly in October 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000
Conflict has prevailed in Ireland since the Normans landed in 1169. The centuries have seen the people of Ulster, the northern tip of the island, struggling through short intervals of tranquillity and long periods of war, but at no other time had the prospect of a lasting political settlement between the Irish and English communities seemed so close as recently.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Reuters
British Prime Minister Tony Blair and his Irish counterpart, Bertie Ahern, demanded immediate progress Monday to refloat Northern Ireland's listing peace process. The two premiers struck a determinedly upbeat tone after talks at Blair's country residence, Chequers. But Northern Ireland Protestant leader David Trimble warned that the province's 1998 Good Friday agreement was close to collapsing. "It's got to be done now.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | From Reuters
Sinn Fein, political wing of the Irish Republican Army, said Saturday it would oppose new proposals aimed at ending decades of political and sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland. The proposals on new power-sharing arrangements in the province were hailed last week as a breakthrough after months of slow-moving negotiations between Northern Ireland's political parties.
WORLD
October 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton urged the rival leaders of Northern Ireland's power-sharing government to keep making their awkward coalition work for the sake of lasting peace. In an address to the Northern Ireland Assembly, with Irish republican Catholics to her left and British loyalist Protestants to her right, Clinton said they should take the next critical step in cooperation -- running the police and justice system together -- as the best way to defeat Irish Republican Army dissidents still plotting bloodshed.
WORLD
November 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Protestant extremist who triggered a panicked evacuation of the Northern Ireland Assembly was charged Saturday with attempting to murder four people, including Sinn Fein leaders Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness. Michael Stone, who was tackled by unarmed guards Friday at the entrance to Stormont Parliamentary Building, was arraigned in Belfast Magistrates' Court on five charges of attempted murder.
WORLD
October 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton urged the rival leaders of Northern Ireland's power-sharing government to keep making their awkward coalition work for the sake of lasting peace. In an address to the Northern Ireland Assembly, with Irish republican Catholics to her left and British loyalist Protestants to her right, Clinton said they should take the next critical step in cooperation -- running the police and justice system together -- as the best way to defeat Irish Republican Army dissidents still plotting bloodshed.
WORLD
June 18, 2009 | Henry Chu
More than 100 Romanians in Northern Ireland were left scrounging for shelter Wednesday after being driven from their homes in a spate of racist violence that has shocked a region still nursing the wounds of decades of sectarian conflict. Officials and community leaders in Belfast, Northern Ireland's capital, roundly condemned the attacks, whose targets were ethnic Roma, or Gypsies, a minority group that has been subject to discrimination and mistreatment across Europe. No injuries were reported.
WORLD
March 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Ian Paisley, the fiery Protestant preacher who eventually embraced peace with his Roman Catholic adversaries, announced his retirement Tuesday as leader of Northern Ireland's power-sharing government. Paisley said he would quit in May as first minister of the 10-month-old coalition and as leader of the Democratic Unionists, the party he founded 37 years ago on a platform of thwarting compromise with the Catholic minority in this British territory.
WORLD
October 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Protestants in Northern Ireland's power-sharing government Tuesday vetoed a Catholic plan to introduce a bill promoting Gaelic. The little-spoken language is promoted by Northern Ireland's Catholics to emphasize their Irish identity on this overwhelmingly English-speaking island.
WORLD
November 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Protestant extremist who triggered a panicked evacuation of the Northern Ireland Assembly was charged Saturday with attempting to murder four people, including Sinn Fein leaders Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness. Michael Stone, who was tackled by unarmed guards Friday at the entrance to Stormont Parliamentary Building, was arraigned in Belfast Magistrates' Court on five charges of attempted murder.
WORLD
November 25, 2006 | William Graham, Special to The Times
A Protestant militant armed with a gun and explosives tried to enter the Northern Ireland Assembly building Friday shortly after delegates inside missed another deadline on forming a provincial government. Michael Stone, who spent more than a decade in prison for the murders of three men at an Irish Republican Army funeral in 1988, tried to push his way through a revolving door and threw a bag into the assembly's Great Hall that later was found to contain six to eight explosive devices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999
In the long and often painful process of establishing a durable peace in Northern Ireland, this past year has been productive. First came the landmark Good Friday Agreements, which committed most of the feuding political parties of Ulster to a partnership of mutual respect. The agreements obligated the signatories to a new type of relationship within Northern Ireland and also between north and south and between Ireland and Britain.
WORLD
October 5, 2006 | Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writer
The Irish Republican Army has disbanded its units that bought and built weapons, stopped training recruits and ceased intelligence gathering, committing itself to a path of peace, says a periodic report made public Wednesday by a panel monitoring peace efforts in Northern Ireland.
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