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Northridge Meadows

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than eight months, the listing hulk of the Northridge Meadows Apartments complex has haunted the 9500 block of Reseda Boulevard, a constant reminder of the 16 deaths that occurred there during the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake. On Thursday, attorneys and city officials say, Northridge Meadows finally will start coming down.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
Little-used housing rules may already allow apartment owners to pass on all seismic retrofit costs to tenants in Los Angeles, according to city officials. The rules may allow owners to impose higher rent hikes than normally allowed under the city's rent control law. Such rent increases could encourage owners to strengthen apartment buildings at risk of collapse in a major earthquake. The laws were uncovered following questions by Councilman Bernard C. Parks to the city's housing department, as city officials debate whether to require retrofits of quake-vulnerable buildings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
An apartment complex may rise on the site of the Northridge Meadows building that collapsed in the Northridge quake, killing 16 residents in the largest concentration of deaths in the temblor. A Los Angeles City Council subcommittee has approved a request for $5.7 million in financial support from a developer who wants to build housing on the site once occupied by the building, which was demolished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council member wants to allow owners who seismically retrofit apartment buildings to pass on the costs of earthquake strengthening to tenants. Councilman Bernard C. Parks said he wants the city to explore giving these apartment owners an exemption from the city's rent control law to "incentivize retrofitting. " Right now, only 50% of the cost of major apartment rehabilitation projects can be passed through to tenants. Parks wants city staff to evaluate passing through all of the costs to tenants but do it “over a reasonable period of time.” Los Angeles officials have known about the dangers of older concrete and wooden "soft-story" buildings for years, but  concerns about costs killed earlier efforts  in L.A. to require retrofits of privately-owned buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1995 | JILL LEOVY
Dirk Perriseau, a Calabasas-based contractor, and his wife, Jeannine, have agreed to purchase the property that was formerly home to the Northridge Meadows Apartments complex, which collapsed during the Northridge earthquake, killing 16 people. Perriseau has applied to the city of Los Angeles for a low-cost earthquake-recovery loan to finance construction of a 155-unit building on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the pain of those who lost relatives and friends in the Northridge earthquake, a Ventura artist unveiled a painting Sunday of most of the 16 people killed in the collapse of the Northridge Meadows apartments. "We came down here a couple of days after the earthquake, and I saw all of this and said to myself, 'I have to do this,' " Lynn Griffey said. "I don't know if it was God or what, but I felt like no one really knew who these people were."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The whine of chain saws in the early morning fog Monday marked the start of an autopsy on Northridge Meadows, where 16 tenants died in the Jan. 17 earthquake. By noon, sections of the roof had been cut away to reveal the guts of the building, and half a dozen lawyers were arguing their cases at a sidewalk news conference. Former tenants, many from pancaked first-floor units, came to retrieve their belongings and were turned away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still in mourning, Shannon Gilchrist returned to the spot where the earth cracked open in the predawn chill of Jan. 17, 1994. As she slept that morning inside the Northridge Meadows Apartments, a magnitude 6.7 temblor collapsed the building, killing 16 people. The ruin became a national symbol of the suffering and loss of life in the Northridge earthquake. But rebirth rose from the rubble Thursday as the new Parc Ridge Apartments complex was dedicated on Reseda Boulevard.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Survivors of an apartment collapse that killed 16 denounced the owner Saturday, saying that he has added insult to injury by preventing the salvage of their remaining possessions by failing to have the structure inspected. In a chaotic and emotional meeting at a local church, survivors of the Northridge Meadows collapse--the deadliest single incident in Monday's 6.6 temblor--demanded to know when they would have a chance to search through the rubble for their possessions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After telling a judge she has been plagued by shame and remorse, a Carson woman was sentenced to three years probation Monday for receiving $2,300 in federal aid by falsely claiming to have lived in the Northridge Meadows Apartments, where 16 people died during the Northridge quake. U.S. District Court Judge Terry J.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Kari Howard
Friday's front page (yes, the print version) had a touch of “The Day of the Locust” about it. Although the Nathanael West novel is about Hollywood, its biblical allusion to plagues and disaster works for Los Angeles as a whole. What other city has such epic natural disasters etched on the world's imagination? The photo above the fold looked like a painting of a city being menanced by a spooky but oddly beautiful cloud - smoke from the Colby fire, as the wildfire season starts way too soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014
Twenty years ago, a magnitude 6.7 earthquake struck Northridge, killing about 60 people and causing billions of dollars in damage. The quake shook Los Angeles awake at 4:31 a.m. on Jan. 17. Sixteen people were killed in the collapse of the Northridge Meadows apartment complex alone, one of nearly 200 soft-story buildings seriously damaged or destroyed in the quake. Full coverage:  California earthquakes Years later, many structures remained in disrepair, and neighborhoods struggled to recover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council committee agreed Tuesday to push forward a proposal to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame that is vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake. Reporting to a City Council planning committee, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau at the Department of Building and Safety, laid out a plan to winnow out these so-called soft story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978.
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
On Tuesday, the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety will propose a plan for identifying which of the approximately 29,000 apartment buildings constructed in the city before 1978 might be potentially deadly wood frame "soft-story" structures. These buildings, supported by inadequate perimeter walls around open spaces on the ground level - such as carports - run the risk of collapsing during a serious earthquake, causing injury and death. In the 1994 Northridge earthquake, about 200 soft-story buildings were severely damaged or destroyed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles city building officials have concluded that it would take inspectors more than a year to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake. City staffers developed a plan to winnow out these so-called "soft" story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau at the building and safety department, wrote in a report submitted to a City Council planning committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles city building officials have concluded that it would take inspectors more than a year to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake.  City staffers developed a plan to winnow out these so-called "soft" story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1994 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers set out Wednesday to finish the job nature started nearly nine months ago, as wrecking crews commenced demolition of the Northridge Meadows apartment complex, the most searing symbol of human loss in the Jan. 17 earthquake. At 8:30 a.m., a steel-jawed excavator rumbled onto the north end of the Reseda Boulevard complex, chewing through stucco, wood and glass and laying bare hallways and rooms once inhabited by college students, young couples and the elderly.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after he was snatched from death in the quake-flattened void of his apartment at Northridge Meadows, Steve Langdon still is waiting for the sky to fall. He is too vigilant to sleep much, afraid he'll wake up again in that disastrous nether world where 16 of his neighbors were crushed in their beds by the top two stories of an apartment building that collapsed last Jan. 17 during the 6.7-magnitude Northridge earthquake. "I'm always looking--no matter where I am--at what can fall on me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and David Zahniser
Two L.A. City Council members are calling for their colleagues to back a statewide ballot measure that provides funding to cities for "earthquake safety improvements," including helping property owners strengthen potentially dangerous buildings that could collapse in a major temblor. The resolution, proposed Friday by Tom LaBonge and seconded by Mitch Englander, asks the City Council and Mayor Eric Garcetti to support or sponsor state legislation that would help fund local seismic safety efforts.
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