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Northrop Corp

BUSINESS
February 8, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a vivid display of California's limited clout in Congress, an Oklahoma air base was selected Tuesday over Southern California as the location for most of the work of maintaining the Northrop Grumman B-2 bomber fleet. As a result, 350 to 400 Northrop jobs now at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, where the bomber is built, will be transferred to Oklahoma's Tinker Air Force Base by 1998.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1994
BankAmerica, the nation's second-largest banking company, said Wednesday that growth in loans and consumer banking fees boosted its profit 13% during the three-month period ended Sept. 30. The San Francisco-based bank earned $547 million, or $1.36 a share, in the third quarter, compared to $486 million, or $1.19 a share, during the same period last year. BankAmerica's acquisition of Chicago-based Continental Bank Corp., completed in August, was a boon for the company during the quarter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
Birmingham High School in Reseda is among six high schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District awarded $1,000 grants by the Northrop Corp. for math or science instruction and curriculum. Northrop's grant to Birmingham's math department will go toward the purchase of computer software and calculators for students. "We're really very thrilled about this," said Gerald Kleinman, Birmingham principal.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the last B-2 Stealth bomber winds its way through the giant assembly hangar at the Northrop Grumman Corp. plant in Palmdale and 22,000 B-2 jobs nationwide fall into a post-Cold War abyss, the bombers' proponents have embarked on a broad campaign to continue production.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1994 | PAUL KARON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Times are hard in the aerospace business, hard enough that at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s venerable manufacturing facility in Hawthorne, management has taken a radical step. It decided to ditch the big iron. That's not to say the plant will stop being the sole manufacturer of fuselages for Boeing 747 jets. The "big iron" being shed is a 20-year-old IBM mainframe computer, which the fuselage factory will leave for use by other Northrop operations.
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