Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNosplit
IN THE NEWS

Nosplit

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
With SAG and Golden Globe nominations now behind us and Oscar voters starting to mark their nominating ballots, Hollywood's awards season is kicking into high gear. Prognosticating about the winners is a high art in this town, but in an attempt to add a little science to score-keeping, the L.A. Times' HeatMeter is back. Developed last season, the system seeks to quantify the status of the race at various moments and tracks the relative heat of talent, movies, even studios, through the period that culminates with the Academy Awards on Feb. 24. Our movie team has assigned values to the top awards according to our assessment of their relative importance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 3, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
If someone from the Ducks is going to answer the Kings' physical ways Tuesday night as the teams renew their rivalry at Honda Center, recent acquisition Tim Jackman is the most likely. Jackman has 53 penalty minutes in 14 games, 12 in the four he's played since joining the Ducks before their Nov. 22 game. “You can tell just from the morning skate, there's more energy and guys are excited to play,” said Jackman, who has previously dealt with the New York Islanders' grudge with the New York Rangers and in Calgary's Canadian feud with Edmonton.
Advertisement
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The White House said for the first time that there was evidence Syria had used chemical weapons in its civil war, but administration officials called for a broader United Nations investigation and edged away from declaring Damascus had crossed a "red line" that might trigger U.S. intervention. According to a White House letter to Congress, U.S. intelligence agencies assessed "with varying degrees of confidence" that President Bashar Assad's forces had used small amounts of sarin gas, a deadly nerve agent banned by international treaty.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
It's one debate with two faces: Sporadic demonstrations over George Zimmerman's acquittal continued all over the country Tuesday, but two states, on opposite ends of the U.S., have made themselves the focus of the protests, and they've done so by taking divergent paths. In Florida, it's high-wattage activism. Orlando has arguably become the nation's capital of racial discussion and new political pressure, with an NAACP convention bringing big names to discuss the aftermath of Trayvon Martin's death and the prospect of formal political action.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Horsey
Paula Deen, the Southern celebrity chef, has been dumped from the Food Network like a stale beignet. Her Georgia roots are what made her a unique talent in the foodie world, and the darker ends of those roots are what got her in trouble. When her use of the N-word and her less-than-PC racial humor came to light in a court deposition, Deen suddenly found herself swept up in the kind of bad publicity that offers no upside. (There's Charlie Sheen bad -- so bad that it becomes entertainment; and there's Mel Gibson bad -- just plain toxic.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Harvey Weinstein loves a good fight -- especially if it helps him promote one of his company's movies. So when the MPAA's title registration bureau decided this week that the Weinstein Co. couldn't use the title "The Butler" on Lee Daniels' upcoming biopic about the life of a longtime White House butler because it's also the title of a 1916 short film owned by Warner Bros., Weinstein immediately went into outrage mode. Today, he announced the hiring of prominent attorney David Boies, who represented Al Gore in the 2000 recount fight and gay marriage advocates in the recent Supreme Court challenge to California's same-sex marriage ban, as well as filmmaker Michael Moore when he ran afoul of the Treasury Department after visiting Cuba for the Weinstein Co. film "Sicko.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
It's one debate with two faces: Sporadic demonstrations over George Zimmerman's acquittal continued all over the country Tuesday, but two states, on opposite ends of the U.S., have made themselves the focus of the protests, and they've done so by taking divergent paths. In Florida, it's high-wattage activism. Orlando has arguably become the nation's capital of racial discussion and new political pressure, with an NAACP convention bringing big names to discuss the aftermath of Trayvon Martin's death and the prospect of formal political action.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
The Emmys are so predictable … so boring … so uninspired … unless, of course, voters are rewarding your favorite show yet again, and then it's wildly on-target, a well-deserved honor bestowed by perceptive and discriminating industry authorities. FOR THE RECORD: Julia Louis-Dreyfus: The Gold Standard column in the Aug. 9 edition of The Envelope said that Julia Louis-Dreyfus was a 12-time Emmy nominee. The actress has 13 nominations. - Expect a great many predictable (and well-deserved)
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
In the week since Oscar nominations were announced, we've sat through two award shows - the Critics' Choice Awards, thrown by a group of junketeers who, according to Anne Hathaway at least, can't even spell the names of their winners right, and the Golden Globes, hosted by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn., a wacky bunch of journalists whose news conferences require actors to pose for pictures with each and every member. Both these groups gave "Argo" awards for best motion picture drama over "Lincoln.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
He killed at the White House Correspondents' Dinner. His late-night talk show has never been better. And he's hosting the Emmys in September. It's good to be Jimmy Kimmel … unless you're Jimmy Kimmel. He explains why in a recent conversation at his Hollywood office. You said the White House Correspondents' Dinner was the second most terrifying night of your life. What do you remember about the most terrifying night - your first appearance on Letterman? I had 17 pages of things to talk about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Disney's "Oz the Great and Powerful" returned to the top of the DVD and Blu-ray sales chart in its fourth week in release. Buzz around Universal's "Despicable Me 2" continued to boost sales of the original, which took the No. 2 spot.  "The Call," which stars Halle Berry as a 911-operator-turned-hero , was the top rental. Here are the top titles for the week that ended July 7, according to Rentrak. PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013 Top 10 DVD and Blu-ray sales 1. “Oz the Great and Powerful” (Disney)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Harvey Weinstein loves a good fight -- especially if it helps him promote one of his company's movies. So when the MPAA's title registration bureau decided this week that the Weinstein Co. couldn't use the title "The Butler" on Lee Daniels' upcoming biopic about the life of a longtime White House butler because it's also the title of a 1916 short film owned by Warner Bros., Weinstein immediately went into outrage mode. Today, he announced the hiring of prominent attorney David Boies, who represented Al Gore in the 2000 recount fight and gay marriage advocates in the recent Supreme Court challenge to California's same-sex marriage ban, as well as filmmaker Michael Moore when he ran afoul of the Treasury Department after visiting Cuba for the Weinstein Co. film "Sicko.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Horsey
Paula Deen, the Southern celebrity chef, has been dumped from the Food Network like a stale beignet. Her Georgia roots are what made her a unique talent in the foodie world, and the darker ends of those roots are what got her in trouble. When her use of the N-word and her less-than-PC racial humor came to light in a court deposition, Deen suddenly found herself swept up in the kind of bad publicity that offers no upside. (There's Charlie Sheen bad -- so bad that it becomes entertainment; and there's Mel Gibson bad -- just plain toxic.)
NATIONAL
June 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Princeton University was evacuated Tuesday morning after a bomb threat to "multiple, unspecified buildings on campus," officials said. No further information was available about the threat, which created a logjam of traffic leaving the Ivy League university in Princeton, N.J. "Faculty and staff are directed to go home or assemble at evacuation sites as instructed, and students are directed to go into the town of Princeton, where the Nassau Inn,...
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The White House said for the first time that there was evidence Syria had used chemical weapons in its civil war, but administration officials called for a broader United Nations investigation and edged away from declaring Damascus had crossed a "red line" that might trigger U.S. intervention. According to a White House letter to Congress, U.S. intelligence agencies assessed "with varying degrees of confidence" that President Bashar Assad's forces had used small amounts of sarin gas, a deadly nerve agent banned by international treaty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Doug Smith and Oliver Gettell
A flurry of ceremonies over the last 2 1/2 weeks -- the Golden Globes, the Producers Guild prizes and the Screen Actors Guild awards -- has separated pretender from contender in Hollywood's 2012-13 awards season. According to the L.A. Times HeatMeter, which measures the overall traction of personalities and films, a number of things are coming into focus. (The Times' Data Desk compiles rankings based on a formula of nominations and wins; see key below.) The lead actor category has become a one-man field thanks to the dominance of "Lincoln" lead Daniel Day-Lewis.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
"I am 10 years older than I was a year ago. " We believe that's a line Abraham Lincoln said to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at the end of "Lincoln. " Or it could be something "Lincoln" lead Daniel Day-Lewis wearily muttered during one of the endless Q&As he's done during a long campaign of an altogether different sort than the one fought for the Union. What can we say? The lines are blurring at this point, though we're still fairly confident that the great Day-Lewis will put his own stamp on history next month, becoming the first actor to win three Oscars for a lead performance.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
"I am 10 years older than I was a year ago. " We believe that's a line Abraham Lincoln said to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at the end of "Lincoln. " Or it could be something "Lincoln" lead Daniel Day-Lewis wearily muttered during one of the endless Q&As he's done during a long campaign of an altogether different sort than the one fought for the Union. What can we say? The lines are blurring at this point, though we're still fairly confident that the great Day-Lewis will put his own stamp on history next month, becoming the first actor to win three Oscars for a lead performance.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
In the week since Oscar nominations were announced, we've sat through two award shows - the Critics' Choice Awards, thrown by a group of junketeers who, according to Anne Hathaway at least, can't even spell the names of their winners right, and the Golden Globes, hosted by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn., a wacky bunch of journalists whose news conferences require actors to pose for pictures with each and every member. Both these groups gave "Argo" awards for best motion picture drama over "Lincoln.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|