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BUSINESS
August 21, 2010 | By Mary Forgione
Ann Thompson still marvels at the sliver of ranchland she has lived on for the last eight years. "I fell in love with the house," she says of the Spanish Colonial-style home known as the DeWenter Mansion that sits in the quiet foothills of La Verne. "For my husband, it was the property. " Thompson is the most recent resident of an enduring landmark that recalls the heyday of the orange and lemon industry that brought millions of dollars to La Verne in the early 20th century. Many of the original citrus trees still surround the house at this onetime ranch.
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SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Seattle 10, Angels 6 AT THE PLATE: Matt Long is a longshot to make the team, but he's making a good impression. The outfielder followed a four-hit game Monday with a three-hit, two runs-batted-in game and is batting .542 (13 for 24) this spring. Mike Trout and Albert Pujols hit back-to-back run-scoring doubles in the second, the speedy Trout turning what appeared to be a single to left-center into a double. Erick Aybar drew his team-leading seventh walk of the spring. ON THE MOUND: Reliever Kevin Jepsen had a rough sixth inning, allowing two runs and two hits, walking two and balking a runner from first to second.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 2010 | By Darrell Satzman
A stately traditional home with Spanish Colonial elements and a historic pedigree is the centerpiece of this oak-shaded estate in the hills of San Marino. Designed by noted residential architect Roland E. Coate, the home was built in 1926 for Annie Wilson, daughter of pioneering Southern California businessman and politician Benjamin Wilson, for whom Mt. Wilson is named. The gently sloping 1-acre-plus property was once part of the vast holdings of George S. Patton, father of the famed U.S. general, according to real estate historian Tim Gregory.
OPINION
January 24, 2014
Re "A deadly distinction," Jan. 19 Thank you for covering the neglected area of Westmont, the small, unincorporated community between Los Angeles and Inglewood that has L.A. County's top homicide rate. I lived on 93rd and Figueroa streets for 25 years. I tell my children that it's a million miles from that street to Valencia, where they were raised. Since I feel that education may be the best way for the children in that area to leave, I helped to create a scholarship for some of the area's students.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Small Business Administration offers a variety of assistance, including online workshops, seminars and classes. The agency also has step-by-step instructions for starting a business, including tips on market research and creating a business plan. The main national website has links to local SBA district offices throughout the country. Try them at http://www.sba.gov . Click on the tab labeled Small Business Planner for tips on what you may need to know before you start. If you have hit a snag in developing your business or need advice from someone who's been there, try an organization called Score.
TRAVEL
April 17, 2011
AMERICAS Presentation Thomas Laussermair will show images and discuss his bicycling and hiking adventure along the length of the Pan-American Highway. When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at the REI store in Santa Monica, 402 Santa Monica Blvd. Admission, info: Free. (310) 458-4370. ASIA Slide show Mort Loveman will present "Vietnam & Korea: Follow the Dragon. " When, where: 1 p.m. Wednesday at Roxbury Park Community Center, 471 S. Roxbury Drive, Beverly Hills.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2011
Address: 2521 Sonoma St., Torrance 90503 Listed for: $869,900 Size: 5 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms in 3,939 square feet Lot size: 0.13 of an acre Features: The two-story house, built in 1986, has fireplaces in the living and family rooms, and an in-ground spa. MLS ID: S10096975 Address: 20011 Donora Ave., Torrance 90503 Listed for: $799,000 Size: 5 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms in...
FOOD
September 8, 2011
The recipes included here are written for only one portion in order to demonstrate technique and timing. You can cook as many as six pieces quite easily in the same size water bath without too much trouble if you'll check to make sure the temperature hasn't dropped too much (just add more hot water if it has). For cooking more pieces than that, you'll need to check the temperature frequently during the early going to maintain an even heat. Serve these meats with the accompaniments of your choice.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2011
On my recent trip to Britain, I purchased a wireless Internet device called a dongle from Vodafone for 19 pounds, or about $30, which gets you one month of service. This was a plug-and-play device that plugs into a USB port on your netbook (which is what I had with me) or your laptop. While I was in London and Manchester I was able get 3G service practically any time, including in my hotel room. The hotel Internet service would have been about 25 pounds, or about $40, for 24 hours. Bill Mark Redondo Beach
OPINION
December 27, 2013
Re "The umpteenth fix," Editorial, Dec. 24 The Times writes, "We only wish Congress was more engaged in making the law work rather than battling endlessly to make it go away. " Lawmakers and their concerted efforts to drag down the Obama administration have tainted the merits of the monumental achievement of healthcare reform from its birth. It would have been extraordinary if the transition had gone smoothly. There are delays, fixes and tweaks, but instead of spinning the negativity, the end result is what we must be focusing on: a country that finally can say most of its citizens are protected by medical coverage.
SPORTS
December 21, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan
OAKLAND - Kobe Bryant and Steve Nash didn't join the Lakers on their trip but it somehow got worse. Pau Gasol couldn't even leave his hotel room Saturday because of an upper-respiratory infection. To say the Lakers were injury-riddled, short-handed, depleted or any of the other common phrases would be a series of understatements. GAME SUMMARY: Warriors 102, Lakers 83 They're running out of bodies quickly, their latest ailment a surprise that led to something predictable, a 102-83 loss to the Golden State Warriors at Oracle Arena.
OPINION
December 19, 2013
Re "Trying to sell college students on Obamacare," Dec. 15 Instead of trying to sell college students on Obamacare, it would be better to convert it into a universal healthcare plan, a system that other countries have. The insurance industry siphons off some of the money we spend on healthcare. Eliminate that unnecessary burden and we could afford to provide better healthcare for all. Why do we need the insurance industry as a middleman to muddy the waters? Tom Press Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Park and ride Letters: Making the bullet train fly Letters: Collecting DNA can solve crimes
OPINION
December 15, 2013
Re "OED's literal problem," Opinion, Dec. 12 In her delightful column, Meghan Daum bemoans the acknowledgment by the Oxford English Dictionary of the common misuse of "literally," opining that its misuse is not only cheating but "cues the listener to stop listening. " Ironically, this happened to me in reading her article when she equated people living in a different galaxy with residents of Ursa Major. Since Ursa Major is not even close to being a galaxy (it's in our own Milky Way)
OPINION
December 13, 2013
Re "Wage fight is left to cities, states," Dec. 9 Thank goodness that officials at the state and city levels are taking action to boost minimum wages. Not only does this reflect the moral/ethical perspective of the problem, it also has economic benefits. With so many employers paying workers poverty wages, plenty of economists suggest that increasing wages for the lower-income members of society will positively impact everyone. Lower-income citizens will spend more of their increased incomes on goods and services, thus helping to stimulate the economy.
OPINION
December 13, 2013
Re "On a night of fear, violent ambushes in the streets," third in a five-part series, Dec. 12 Since when does old news command the front page of The Times - and in the form of pulp fiction, no less? Upon seeing these articles recounting the search this year for former police officer Christopher Dorner, I wondered if I had gotten the wrong newspaper. The fact that I was somehow spared seeing the first part of the series on Sunday was merciful. This is packaging news as entertainment, and old news at that - a bit too far for my taste.
OPINION
December 12, 2013
Re "Operation Santa strikes a chord," Letters, Dec. 11 I too was touched by Diana Wagman's piece about Operation Santa and looked online to get the details about volunteering. There is one post office in Los Angeles that participates in the program. In addition, the program has surprisingly limited hours (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.), making it nearly impossible for people who work (and therefore may be financially able to help someone in need) to get to this one post office in the allotted time.
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