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June 27, 2012
'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp' Where: Samuel Goldwyn Theater, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills When: 7:30 p.m. Wed. Tickets: Admission: $3 general; $3 for academy members and students with valid ID Info:
August 8, 2012
Re "Barbs over taxes grow sharper," Aug. 4, and "Romney-Reid feud heightens," Aug. 6 This issue is less about how much Mitt Romney has paid in taxes than it is about Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and a complicit news media, which repeats Reid's unsubstantiated allegations with the knowledge that no journalist with a single unnamed source could report the same thing. Why should Romney bow to Reid's sleazy tactic by easily putting the matter to rest with the full knowledge that it would be impossible for Reid to prove his charges?
August 31, 2012
Re "Driver, 100, hits 11 near school," Aug. 30 In addition to yearly written and vision tests, older drivers should have to take the same driving test given to first-time license applicants. I know "older" is an amorphous term, so how about pegging it to Medicare eligibility? Oh, and by the way, I turn 71 soon. Pam Ford Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Paul Ryan on Obama Letters: Lancaster's eyes in the sky Letters: Romney's overseas investments
August 21, 2010 | Tim Rutten
On Monday, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Sen. Barbara Boxer will convene a closed-door discussion with local and national transit experts on how to push forward the nation's most important public works initiative. That's Villaraigosa's 30/10 plan, which proposes leveraging the half-cent sales tax increase Los Angeles County residents agreed to in passing Measure R with federal guarantees and loans secured by future tax revenues. Those guarantees and loans would allow the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to build the 12 crucial projects specified in the measure in just 10 years rather than the projected 30. Measure R will generate $40 billion in local tax revenue, of which 35% will go for the construction of the dozen rail lines and busways.
October 21, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California corporations, big and small, have billions of dollars' worth of tax breaks and fees in play with a trio of initiatives on the November ballot ? propositions some observers believe may prove too complicated to voters. The outcomes of the battles over Propositions 24, 25 and 26 could help fill a hole in the state budget, an appealing factor in the tough economic times that the state and its citizens are facing. With chronic deficits and one of the highest unemployment rates in the nation, the state has been looking everywhere to generate tax revenue.
July 26, 2012
Dirty Projectors with Wye Oak Where: The Wiltern When: Sat., doors open 8 p.m. Tickets: $26.50 to $34 Info:
August 18, 2012
Re "High-speed aircraft fails test flight," Business, Aug. 16 The Pentagon has spent upward of $2 billion to drop several expensive machines into the Pacific Ocean - all so that maybe, someday, we can launch air-breathing missiles from halfway around the world to blow something up. Maybe, if the technology ever works. Someday. Meanwhile, the Republicans want to end federal subsidies to the Corp. for Public Broadcasting (about $400 million in 2011), turn Medicare into a voucher system so seniors can buy health insurance, and repeal the Affordable Care Act so insurance companies don't have to cover people with preexisting conditions.
August 28, 2012
  Friday will be Robin Roberts' last day on "Good Morning America" before she goes on medical leave to receive a bone-marrow transplant, the show confirmed Monday. "I can't imagine not getting up and being here," Roberts said in a discussion with co-anchors George Stephanopoulos and Lara Spencer. The donation is coming from her sister, Sally. In advance of Roberts' departure, "Good Morning America" this week is featuring stories of people afflicted by MDS, the rare blood disorder Roberts was diagnosed with this spring.
October 20, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from St. Louis — For a team that led the majors in hitting this season, it wasn't much of a rally: a couple of squib hits, a stolen base, an error and a scoring fly ball off the bat of a one-legged outfielder. But it might prove to be the rally that saves the season for the Texas Rangers, who scored on a pair of ninth-inning sacrifice flies Thursday to beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 in Game 2 of the World Series, evening the best-of-seven series heading back to Texas for Game 3 on Saturday.
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