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SPORTS
May 30, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Moments after center Mike Richards woke up Wednesday, he realized he could enjoy a rare and welcome luxury. The Kings' seven-game playoff victory over the San Jose Sharks, completed on Tuesday with a 2-1 triumph at Staples Center, had launched them into the Western Conference finals and led Coach Darryl Sutter to give players a day off. After pushing himself through a compressed, 48-game season and 13 rugged playoff games Richards took advantage of...
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OPINION
May 29, 2013
Re "Good news on health costs," Editorial, May 24 Yes, it will be very, very good news when these state health insurance exchanges give individuals and small groups the buying power of large employers and other big groups within the insurance game. However, as the editorial points out, we still have to overcome a new kind of moral hazard: "The rest will have to be convinced that it's worth paying $1,360 or more next year instead of facing a $95 tax penalty. " That penalty is going to increase at a fast clip over a few years, but the reluctance of the currently healthy to buy coverage also can be overcome by imposing a $10,000 to $15,000 late entry fee for those who sign up only when they need it, and not before.
OPINION
May 26, 2013
Re "Obama's 'idiot' defense," Opinion, May 21 Jonah Goldberg says the White House faces three scandals not because of lying but because a government "that takes on too much will make an idiot out of anyone who thinks there's no limit to what it can do. " His examples don't support this. It appears that the IRS office tasked with evaluating applications from groups seeking tax-exempt status had been left almost on its own due to cutbacks. The office needed more help, not less.
OPINION
May 26, 2013
Re "Cable TV, the right way," Opinion, May 23 Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) says he's a certifiable sports nut and could never go without ESPN, so he wants to make it less expensive. In fact, he's willing to go up against "well-paid lobbyists" and seems to favor more regulation of the cable TV industry to keep the American people from being "ripped off. " Frankly, I find all this a bit self-serving, but then I've noticed that the problems with the best chance of being addressed are those that directly affect members of Congress.
OPINION
May 25, 2013
Re "Issa tested by the spotlight," May 22 The IRS did what it was supposed to do regarding 501(c)(4)s, but in a way that strongly suggested partisan bias by investigating "tea party"-related groups during the Obama administration and liberal churches such as All Saints in Pasadena during the Bush administration. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista) runs his House Oversight and Government Reform Committee the same way as the IRS, not bothering to go down investigative roads that might lead to answers that can't be used to partisan advantage.
OPINION
May 18, 2013
Re "The gift of a great dog," Opinion, May 16 A year ago I too thought that I'd had that one great dog, that canine soul mate never to be found again. My 13-year-old shepherd had passed away, and I was heartbroken. I couldn't even consider getting another dog for months, as I knew it would not be fair to a new dog to constantly fall short in comparison. After six months, one day when I least expected it, a 6-year-old rescued shepherd came into my family's life. We love him passionately, and now he has become the best dog ever.
OPINION
May 18, 2013
Re "Go ahead, ask for a raise," Opinion, May 14 Barbara Garson's argument rests on the claim that from 1971 to 2007, worker productivity soared while inflation-adjusted worker well-being barely budged. This premise is faulty. Garson uses wages rather than total compensation (which has grown far faster), dramatically understating workers' real "pay" growth. Further, the index used to deflate wages substantially over-adjusts for inflation compared to productivity measures, creating a huge measurement bias.
OPINION
May 16, 2013
Re "Journalists' records secretly collected," May 14 With any right there are associated responsibilities and restrictions. The 2nd Amendment guarantees the right to bear arms - well, not if you are a convicted felon or criminally insane. The 1st Amendment prohibits abridging the freedom of the press. I assume that does not include publishing my Social Security number or my IRA account number and password. The Associated Press' reporting of the details of a foiled terrorist plot to bring down an aircraft is not holding the government accountable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Two years, two states. In 2009, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad laid out a plan to end the decades-long territorial stalemate between Israel and the Palestinians. But by 2011, despite Fayyad's efforts, including a successful campaign to improve Palestinians' economic and institutional infrastructure - a kind of "if you build it, statehood will come" - the situation remained deadlocked. This period of hope, progress, frustration and fracture is examined with equanimity and clarity by Israeli filmmaker Dan Setton in the absorbing documentary "State 194. " Setton focuses on the seemingly level-headed, optimistic Fayyad as he navigated the choppy waters of domestic politics and international diplomacy while pressing the United Nations for statehood and to make it its 194th member nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Dynamics have shifted dramatically in California's Capitol since Gov. Jerry Brown returned two years ago - both fiscal and political dynamics. The two are intertwined. And Brown is the beneficiary. In short, because the state's fiscal health is being restored - in no small part because of Brown - he is in a much stronger position to deal with the Legislature. Essentially, the governor now needs the Legislature much less than it needs him. Brown referred to this ground-shifting in a comment toward the end of his budget news conference Tuesday.
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