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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times. It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times. It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and David Sarno
Declaring expansion of broadband Internet access the nation's next great infrastructure challenge, federal regulators Monday unveiled an ambitious, decade-long project to make super high-speed connections available in every corner of the country. The plan by the Federal Communications Commission sets a goal of making sure at least 100 million homes have affordable access to networks that allow downloading data from the Internet at speeds of at least 100 megabits per second -- at least 20 times faster than what most people get today.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and David Sarno
Declaring expansion of broadband Internet access the nation's next great infrastructure challenge, federal regulators Monday unveiled an ambitious, decade-long project to make super high-speed connections available in every corner of the country. The plan by the Federal Communications Commission sets a goal of making sure at least 100 million homes have affordable access to networks that allow downloading data from the Internet at speeds of at least 100 megabits per second -- at least 20 times faster than what most people get today.
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