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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times. It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2010 | Meghan Daum
As I declare every chance I get, I hate to shop. Department stores make me feel as though Chanel No. 5 was mustard gas, seeping into my skin. Big-box stores make me hate humanity. Pricey boutiques make me hate myself. So when I read about a new study that found that the average woman spends eight years of her life shopping, I smugly reveled in my un-averageness. After surveying 2,000 women, the global market research company OnePoll found that over a period of 63 years, the typical female spends 25,184 hours and 53 minutes shopping for food, clothing and other household essentials for the family.
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OPINION
December 19, 2009 | Tim Rutten
This era is like no other in American journalism: People are consuming more news than ever before, but they're also far more critical of its purveyors than they've ever been. We remain generally agreed that a free press is democracy's cornerstone, but there's less consensus than ever on what the news media ought to be -- or, for that matter, what rapid technological, economic and demographic change will allow it to be. That makes three sets of little-noticed numbers released this week of more than passing interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
In late April 2007, Mike Penner published an article unlike any of the thousands he had written for the Los Angeles Times. It was brief, just 823 words, and placed without fanfare on the second page of the Sports section that had been his home for 23 years. Under the headline "Old Mike, new Christine," Penner explained that he would soon assume a female identity and byline, a decision that followed "a million tears and hundreds of hours of soul-wrenching therapy." It was "heartache and unbearable discomfort" to remain a man, he explained.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010 | By Susan King
After being shut out at the Golden Globes last week and the Screen Actors Guild awards on Saturday night, "The Hurt Locker" won the Producers Guild of America's Darryl F. Zanuck producer of the year award on Sunday. The award went to producers Kathryn Bigelow (who also directed), Mark Boal (who wrote the screenplay), Nicolas Chartier and Greg Shapiro. The heart-pounding drama about a bomb-defusing unit in the Iraq war had won several recent critics' honors but lost footing after the Globes chose "Avatar" as best dramatic film and the SAG film ensemble award went to "Inglourious Basterds."
NATIONAL
December 22, 2009 | By Noam Levey
Senate Democrats took another step toward passing the sweeping healthcare overhaul before Christmas, adopting a package of modifications to their legislation and defeating another Republican-led filibuster early today. The package includes a series of compromises worked out by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) with other Democrats. Senators approved it, 60 to 39. Then they voted to limit debate, also 60 to 39. Republican Sen. James M. Inhofe, of Oklahoma, was absent.
OPINION
December 20, 2009 | Doyle McManus
Last June, a long time ago in politics, Democrats in the Senate were briefly jubilant. For the first time in a generation, they held 60 seats, the "supermajority" required to control the Senate's proceedings. The road to enacting President Obama's center-left agenda looked, for a moment, almost smooth. But that's not how the Senate works. It's an assembly of 100 independent egos, not a parliament of two disciplined parties. The word "control" doesn't apply. Last week, as Majority Leader Harry Reid struggled to corral 60 votes to move a healthcare bill forward, the jubilation of summer gave way to desperation on cold winter nights -- with occasional flashes of recrimination.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010 | By Susan King
"Avatar" won a record-breaking six Critics' Choice Movie Awards on Friday night, but it was the independent Iraq war drama "The Hurt Locker" took home the best picture honors from the Broadcast Film Critics Assn. Kathryn Bigelow also won as director of the harrowing ensemble war film. "The Hurt Locker," which is nominated for best picture and director at Sunday's Golden Globes, has received the lion's share of critics' awards, including honors from the L.A. Film Critics Assn.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2010 | By Andrea Chang
Shoppers spent more than they planned during the Christmas season, giving retailers a much-needed sales spurt that industry watchers are hoping will continue this year. Consumers spent an average of $811 on holiday gifts, significantly more than the $699 they initially planned to spend, according to a Consumer Reports survey expected to be released today. About 4 in 5 consumers bought gifts, and in a good sign for discretionary spending, many shoppers bought for themselves, the poll found.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
A total of 315,716 U.S. homes were mired in the foreclosure process in January, a 10% decline from foreclosure activity measured in December, a real estate firm will report Thursday. That number is still 15% above the level of foreclosure activity reported by RealtyTrac in January 2009. The report by the company, which sells foreclosure information to consumers online, shows that 1 in 409 U.S. homes last month was listed in a foreclosure filing -- default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2010 | By Ann Powers pop critic reporting from austin, texas >>>
A stranger wandering into the scene that overtakes downtown Austin, Texas, every year during the music portion of the South by Southwest festival could be forgiven for thinking it was some kind of apocalypse. The din, the trash, the packs of stumblers forming strange clumps of humanity in the middle of each block and then dispersing across the intersections -- the total environment emanates disaster. It's really a party, of course, a packed gathering of fans jumping from club to club in search of the perfect set from the thousand-plus artists playing dozens of showcases in dozens of venues around Austin's core.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2010 | By Lee Margulies
Two weeks after winning Oscars, "Up" and "The Cove" received additional honors Saturday at the 24th annual Genesis Awards, which honor media depictions of animal protection issues. "The Cove," which chronicles the slaughter of dolphins by fisherman from a Japanese village, was named outstanding documentary film. "Up," the animated adventure from Pixar that involves the fight to protect a rare bird, shared the feature film award with "Hotel for Dogs," a comedy with Lisa Kudrow and Don Cheadle that was applauded for "celebrating the special bond between children and dogs."
NATIONAL
March 22, 2010 | By James Oliphant
As the office phones buzzed, party leaders hectored and protesters outside roared, several undecided House Democrats this weekend faced an unpleasant and all-too-realistic prospect: that voting for the healthcare overhaul could doom their careers. Some bit their lips and went ahead, perhaps saying a silent prayer along the way. But others begged off, declining to support the bill for a number of reasons, including its effect on state Medicaid budgets and concerns about its effect on seniors.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2010 | By Mark Silva and Janet Hook
As the House prepares to convene Sunday afternoon for action on President Obama's long-pursued overhaul of healthcare, the House's Democratic leadership is voicing confidence in passage of the bill. "We've got the votes," Rep. John Larson (D-Conn.) said in an appearance Sunday morning on CNN's "State of the Union." The House plans to convene at 1 p.m. Eastern time to take up a "reconciliation" measure that merges the House and Senate on healthcare and vote on a Senate-passed healthcare bill.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and David Sarno
Declaring expansion of broadband Internet access the nation's next great infrastructure challenge, federal regulators Monday unveiled an ambitious, decade-long project to make super high-speed connections available in every corner of the country. The plan by the Federal Communications Commission sets a goal of making sure at least 100 million homes have affordable access to networks that allow downloading data from the Internet at speeds of at least 100 megabits per second -- at least 20 times faster than what most people get today.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Alejandro Lazo
The number of homes caught up in some stage of the foreclosure process in February fell 2% from the previous month to 308,524, a real estate firm will report Thursday. That number is up 6% compared with the same month a year earlier but marked the smallest year-over-year increase since January 2006, according to RealtyTrac Inc. Executives at the Irvine firm attributed the steady decline in foreclosure activity to efforts by banks to keep people in their homes through the Obama administration's $75-billion plan to help troubled borrowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2010 | By Ann Powers pop critic reporting from austin, texas >>>
A stranger wandering into the scene that overtakes downtown Austin, Texas, every year during the music portion of the South by Southwest festival could be forgiven for thinking it was some kind of apocalypse. The din, the trash, the packs of stumblers forming strange clumps of humanity in the middle of each block and then dispersing across the intersections -- the total environment emanates disaster. It's really a party, of course, a packed gathering of fans jumping from club to club in search of the perfect set from the thousand-plus artists playing dozens of showcases in dozens of venues around Austin's core.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By Mikael Wood
Chris Brown had already pleaded guilty to assaulting his then-girlfriend Rihanna earlier this year. But Wednesday night at the Avalon, in his first local performance since being sentenced to probation and community service in the February altercation in L.A., Brown still seemed to be offering up character witnesses in an attempt to prove, as he insists in a widely circulated YouTube video, that he's no monster. First up was Keri Hilson, who appeared not long into Brown's hourlong set and sang her hit "Turnin' Me On."
OPINION
March 1, 2010 | By Joe Simitian
California's hands-free cellphone law has been a lifesaver. According to California Highway Patrol statistics, the law has helped reduce the number of annual fatalities on our roads by 700 and collisions by between 75,000 and 100,000. CHP data also show that traffic fatalities and crashes in California were each down by roughly 20% in the first six months since the law took effect on July 1, 2008, compared with the same six-month periods of previous years. These statistics are all the more compelling when you consider the steady increase in the number of licensed drivers in California over the last several years, and the fact that there are more than double the number of cellphones out there today than there were just a decade ago. Although compliance with the new law has been good, it certainly could be better.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu
Southern California is headed for a gradual economic recovery in 2010 and 2011, along with the rest of the state and the country, according to a forecast released today. Unemployment will remain elevated, but the entertainment, international trade and tourism sectors will push growth regionally, according to the report from the Kyser Center for Economic Research at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. "The feeling is that the worst is past and we are looking at a modest recovery," said Jack Kyser, founding economist of the center.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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