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WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Usama Redha
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's slate had an early lead Saturday as partial results trickled in from the parliamentary elections last weekend. With 10% to 30% of the vote counted in 11 of Iraq's 18 provinces, Maliki's State of Law slate was winning in Baghdad and four southern provinces, Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission reported. But his lead could easily be wiped away, with final election results expected to take at least a month to certify. State of Law, which bills itself as nonsectarian, had predicted it would win 100 seats in the 325-member parliament, taking Baghdad and Iraq's nine southern provinces.
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WORLD
July 19, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Abbas al Nouri pauses as a particularly loud car roars past the cafe on the main thoroughfare. The overly solicitous waitress lingers, a hint of recognition in her eyes. At the table, the conversation inevitably focuses on Al Nouri's native Syria. "The father who cannot listen to his children is a failure, and this is something that destroys the family," Al Nouri says, the metaphor describing the war pitting armed rebels against the government of President Bashar Assad.
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WORLD
December 11, 2009 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki on Thursday emerged virtually unscathed from a parliament session called over this week's car bombings in the capital and a series of explosions since August that have caused lawmakers to publicly question his handling of the security situation in Iraq. As Maliki parried with lawmakers for nearly six hours, the Islamic State of Iraq, an umbrella group for insurgents that includes Al Qaeda in Iraq, claimed responsibility for Tuesday's bombings, which killed 127 people.
WORLD
February 13, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
RAMADI, Iraq - The call to prayer echoes across the quiet highway in western Iraq and a few hundred men gather along the roadside in the frigid night air. Each has a story to tell: a father whose son languishes in jail without trial; a veteran who cannot get a job; a student so terrified of the police that he avoids Baghdad. In the morning, they know the area will fill with thousands of people like them, with stories like their own. Under the flutter of tribal flags, they will shout boisterously the same words heard from protesters across the Arab world: Down with the regime.
WORLD
September 11, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Nouri Maliki on Saturday accepted the resignation of Iraq's top corruption fighter, whom some observers labeled a casualty of political infighting in a country where graft is rampant. Raheem Uqaili, the chairman of the independent watchdog Integrity Commission, had drawn admirers and detractors alike for taking on cases targeting key figures in the Defense Ministry and other government agencies. A statement by Maliki's office said that "based on the wishes of the chairman of the Integrity Commission," the prime minister had accepted the request to step down.
WORLD
July 19, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Abbas al Nouri pauses as a particularly loud car roars past the cafe on the main thoroughfare. The overly solicitous waitress lingers, a hint of recognition in her eyes. At the table, the conversation inevitably focuses on Al Nouri's native Syria. "The father who cannot listen to his children is a failure, and this is something that destroys the family," Al Nouri says, the metaphor describing the war pitting armed rebels against the government of President Bashar Assad.
OPINION
March 30, 2010
In Iraq, winning the vote and winning power are two entirely different propositions. Former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi's secular Iraqiya bloc has garnered the most seats in parliament, beating current Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's predominantly Shiite State of Law coalition. Allawi's 91 seats give him a plurality, not an outright majority, in the 325-seat parliament, but the constitution says that the top vote-getter should have the first shot at forming a government. Nevertheless, Maliki has been challenging the election results every which way, within the elastic boundaries of the law. He has tried but so far failed to secure a recount of what international observers determined to be a sufficiently fair and transparent vote.
WORLD
March 23, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Senior politicians from Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's ruling coalition warned Tuesday that Shiite Muslim-dominated southern Iraq could severely loosen its ties with Baghdad if the nation's electoral commission failed to meet its demand for a manual recount of ballots in parliamentary elections. The politicians, who also echoed Maliki's warning Sunday that sectarian violence could return without a recount, accused the U.S. Embassy of working against them. In turn, Western diplomats and advisors to the Iraqi government described Maliki's circle as terrified of losing power and said Iraq was entering a dangerous period.
WORLD
July 20, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Nearly a year after pulling out of Iraq's "unity government," the main Sunni Arab political bloc returned to the Shiite Muslim-led Cabinet on Saturday, in a breakthrough for efforts to mend relations between the country's largest religious communities. The decision represented a victory for Shiite Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, who earlier this year was facing calls for a vote of no confidence over his failure to build an effective governing coalition. U.S.
WORLD
March 15, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Salar Jaff, Los Angeles Times
The Iraqi government announced Monday that it would shut down a controversial jail that has been dogged by allegations of abuse. The jail in Baghdad's high-security Green Zone, called Camp Honor, fell under the nominal supervision of the Justice Ministry. But it was actually controlled by two elite security branches affiliated with Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's military office, the Baghdad Brigade and Counter-Terrorism Bureau. The detention center had its own investigators and barred families and lawyers from visiting.
WORLD
December 13, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
With the last U.S. troops set to depart Iraq, President Obama on Monday welcomed a new phase of "equal partnership" with the Iraqi government, even as both sides admit uncertainty about how that will work. "We're here to mark the end of this war," Obama said, appearing alongside Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki at the White House, and to "begin a new chapter in the history between our countries — a normal relationship between sovereign nations. " The Obama administration faces a host of challenges in postwar Iraq, where the role of the U.S. military in providing future training and assistance for security forces has yet to be defined, beyond both leaders saying it was vital to Iraq's long-term stability.
WORLD
September 11, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Nouri Maliki on Saturday accepted the resignation of Iraq's top corruption fighter, whom some observers labeled a casualty of political infighting in a country where graft is rampant. Raheem Uqaili, the chairman of the independent watchdog Integrity Commission, had drawn admirers and detractors alike for taking on cases targeting key figures in the Defense Ministry and other government agencies. A statement by Maliki's office said that "based on the wishes of the chairman of the Integrity Commission," the prime minister had accepted the request to step down.
WORLD
July 31, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Nouri Maliki announced Saturday that Iraq plans to buy 36 U.S. fighter jets, signaling his intent to seek a long-term American military training presence in the country. But in an indication of the risks for the American military here, a U.S. watchdog group said that Iraq had become more hazardous. "Iraq remains an extraordinarily dangerous place to work," Stuart Bowen, chief of the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction, said in a report. "It is less safe, in my judgment, than 12 months ago. " The report notes that 44 Iraqi government and security officials have been assassinated since April.
WORLD
July 27, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
In an illustration of its growing muscle in Iraq as U.S. influence wanes, anti-American cleric Muqtada Sadr's movement has won pardons for at least 50 prisoners jailed for crimes including murder, kidnapping and attacks on U.S. troops. The amnesties come at a time when U.S. forces remaining in Iraq have faced an increased number of attacks, many by Shiite Muslim militias associated with the Sadr movement. And they have angered some senior Iraqi officials, who charge that the law is being applied selectively and bent to fit a hidden political agenda.
WORLD
July 11, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Sunday that weapons supplied by Iran are behind a rash of attacks against American forces in Iraq, part of an escalating campaign of violence ahead of the planned U.S. troop withdrawal by the end of the year. "We're seeing more of those weapons going in from Iran, and they've really hurt us," said Panetta, who arrived in Baghdad on an unannounced visit after a two-day stop in Afghanistan. U.S. officials said 15 U.S. troops were killed in June, the most in any month in two years.
WORLD
May 12, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Raheem Salman and Salar Jaff, Los Angeles Times
Six months after agreeing to form a national unity government, Prime Minister Nouri Maliki and his secular rival Iyad Allawi are again exchanging insults and cannot agree on such basic issues as who should run the nation's police and army. The rift, though unlikely to send Iraq back into sectarian violence, does have Iraqi and Western analysts concerned that the country will continue on a dysfunctional path as American troops move to complete their withdrawal by year's end, nearly nine years after the invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein.
WORLD
May 1, 2010 | By Caesar Ahmed and Borzou Daragahi
Iraq's prime minister dismissed his rival's call for international help to resolve the country's postelection political crisis as the dispute threatens to inflame rifts and undermine American plans for withdrawal. In a televised speech Friday, Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, whose political bloc finished a close second behind former premier Iyad Allawi's slate in the March 7 elections, alleged that "regional, international" players were attempting a coup d'etat against his government.
WORLD
April 6, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Bombs gutted a market and destroyed at least four buildings in working-class Shiite Muslim areas of Baghdad on Tuesday, killing dozens as violence following last month's election continued to escalate and raise fears among Iraqis that a new civil war could erupt. In some of the cases, unknown men had rented rooms in buildings around the city, wired them with explosives and detonated their devices on Tuesday morning. Security sources said that the first explosions took place shortly before 9 a.m. in the adjoining Shiite districts of Shoula and Shukuk; within the next two hours, a building, home to a restaurant and children's arcade, was dynamited in the western neighborhood of Allawi; and a car bomb exploded and another building was destroyed elsewhere western Baghdad.
WORLD
April 20, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Misurata, the only rebel-held city in western Libya, has asked that NATO troops be sent to fight alongside the rebels holding off Libyan forces, a local government representative said Tuesday. "If they don't come, we will die," Nouri Abdul Ati, a member of the 17-member ruling body in Misurata, told reporters as heavy machine gun fire, rockets and mortar rounds exploded in the near distance. "Grad rockets don't leave anybody alive," he said, referring to the truck-mounted rockets used by the Libyan military.
WORLD
March 15, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Salar Jaff, Los Angeles Times
The Iraqi government announced Monday that it would shut down a controversial jail that has been dogged by allegations of abuse. The jail in Baghdad's high-security Green Zone, called Camp Honor, fell under the nominal supervision of the Justice Ministry. But it was actually controlled by two elite security branches affiliated with Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's military office, the Baghdad Brigade and Counter-Terrorism Bureau. The detention center had its own investigators and barred families and lawyers from visiting.
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