Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNsa Surveillance
IN THE NEWS

Nsa Surveillance

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Big Brother is watching. And people are reading. Thanks to the ongoing National Security Administration surveillance scandal, George Orwell's "1984" is enjoying a surge in popularity, landing at No. 4 on Amazon's list of " Movers and Shakers . " Sales of Orwell's classic have risen an astonishing 5,771% as of Tuesday morning, with a current sales rank of 213, up from 12,507 just a few days ago. A different edition of the novel has even made...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 11, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Google, Twitter and Microsoft were among the nation's tech companies who lent their support to an anti-spying protest Tuesday that urged Congress to restrict the National Security Agency's powers. " The Day We Fight Back " campaign, formally supported by civil liberties groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union and websites, including Reddit, aims to end "mass surveillance -- of both Americans and the citizens of the whole world," according to a news release from the coalition.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This week's riveting scoops in the Guardian and the Washington Post about the data-grabbing driftnet the National Security Agency has cast over the phone networks and the Internet drew hostile fire from four of the country's five largest newspapers, and a spirited defense from the fifth. The disagreement highlights the fact that there really are pros and cons to government surveillance, and there's no clear red line to alert the public when it's time to worry about the liberties they may be losing.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona, which has tried to school the federal government in immigration enforcement, again wants to teach the U.S. a lesson. This time, a junior state lawmaker intends to take on the National Security Agency, which has been under fire for controversial data-collection tactics that include keeping records of every telephone number dialed in the U.S. for five years. State Sen. Kelli Ward, a tea party Republican who represents the Lake Havasu area, introduced a bill this month intended to limit NSA operations in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
PEN American Center's report “Chilling Effects,” officially released Tuesday morning, offers some disturbing data about the effect of government surveillance on free expression and self-censorship in the literary world. Of more than 520 American writers surveyed, 16% have avoided writing or speaking on what they consider controversial topics, and 11% “have considered doing so.” The percentages are even higher when it comes to phone or email conversations and social media, which is increasingly part of the writers' toolbox.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
Amid reports this summer of the National Security Agency's accessing troves of private communications, technology companies have sought to distance themselves from allegations of cooperation with government authorities, while reassuring users that their information is safe. The latest chapter in the face-off between the government intelligence apparatus and technology companies emerged last week with reports that the NSA was working, often successfully, to undermine encryption technology.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- The public got its first look at the secret court order that authorized the government's vast collection of records of domestic telephone calls as the Obama administration moved Wednesday to try to boost public confidence in the National Security Agency's program. The order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court lays out the rules under which the program operates, mirroring the descriptions that U.S. officials have given in the weeks since the program was disclosed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona, which has tried to school the federal government in immigration enforcement, again wants to teach the U.S. a lesson. This time, a junior state lawmaker intends to take on the National Security Agency, which has been under fire for controversial data-collection tactics that include keeping records of every telephone number dialed in the U.S. for five years. State Sen. Kelli Ward, a tea party Republican who represents the Lake Havasu area, introduced a bill this month intended to limit NSA operations in Arizona.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - After weeks of mounting controversy and doubts in Congress, the Obama administration made its most detailed effort yet to reassure the public about the National Security Agency's massive collection of Americans' telephone records, releasing previously classified documents in an effort to save a program that appears increasingly endangered. But the documents, which included a secret order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that was once so highly classified that only those with a "need to know" could see it, appeared to do little to quiet the calls in Congress to rein in the NSA's authority.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Yahoo has released its first ever transparency report , shedding some light on the number of government data requests it receives. The report comes amid damaging disclosures that the National Security Agency can crack the encryption of online traffic - - email, medical records, online shopping and other Web activities - - of the world's biggest Internet companies, including Yahoo. The disclosures in the Guardian, The New York Times and ProPublica were taken from documents from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden and raise a fresh batch of concerns about the security of personal information stored online.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By David Lauter
For all the attention generated by the controversy over Edward Snowden's disclosures of U.S. spying operations, much of the public has paid little attention to the details of the policy debate over government surveillance, polls have shown. The latest evidence comes from a new Pew Research Center poll showing that half the public said they had heard nothing at all about President Obama's speech Friday outlining new restrictions on the National Security Agency. Only 8% of those surveyed said they had "heard a lot" about Obama's plans.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama will modify the way the government uses a vast database of American phone records so that officials must have judicial permission before examining the data, a senior administration official said.  In a speech Friday morning, Obama will also order an eventual end to the way the government holds the records, the official said. The database shows which phone numbers are called from which others and when. Obama will direct the Justice Department to figure out how to maintain the database without having the government directly control the data.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- A presidential task force has urged the White House to adopt significant new curbs on the National Security Agency, including that the spy agency stop bulk collection of domestic telephone records and that the U.S. consider “no spying agreements” with close allies overseas. The five-member panel said their 46 recommendations were designed to add transparency, accountability and oversight over the NSA, a secretive electronic spying agency that has operated in the shadows even as its ability to intercept Internet traffic and eavesdrop on other communications has burgeoned in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
PEN American Center's report “Chilling Effects,” officially released Tuesday morning, offers some disturbing data about the effect of government surveillance on free expression and self-censorship in the literary world. Of more than 520 American writers surveyed, 16% have avoided writing or speaking on what they consider controversial topics, and 11% “have considered doing so.” The percentages are even higher when it comes to phone or email conversations and social media, which is increasingly part of the writers' toolbox.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency has been secretly collecting Internet data -- almost certainly including American email traffic -- as it transits to Google and Yahoo servers abroad, according to the latest disclosure from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden . The documents, reported by the Washington Post , describe a project code-named MUSCULAR, a cooperative effort with the agency's British counterpart, GCHQ. Even though NSA has been obtaining data directly from Google and Yahoo with court orders through the previously disclosed PRISM program , the new documents show it also has been taking data without permission abroad, outside the oversight of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The expanding transatlantic scandal over U.S. eavesdropping on Europe's leaders and spying on its citizens has begun to strain intelligence relationships and diplomatic ties between allies that call each other best friends, according to diplomats and foreign policy experts. The cascade of embarrassing disclosures is not expected to upend one of President Obama's goals, a proposed transatlantic free-trade agreement that could generate billions of dollars a year, or halt cooperation on top security issues, such as efforts to curb Iran's nuclear program and contain the Syrian civil war. But the documents leaked by former National Security Agency computer specialist Edward Snowden, which on Wednesday exposed a joint U.S.-British spying operation on the Internet, have caused friction in multiple capitals and put the Obama administration on the defensive at home and abroad.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Seems that Nostradamus has nothing on me. On Monday, musing about the weekend mayhem in Huntington Beach after the U.S. Open of Surfing, I peered into my crystal ball and proposed a high-tech solution to such violence: the Breathe Into the Phone to Prove You're Sober app. And like the ancient sage, it turns out I was right -- kind of. There is a high-tech solution, but it's staring us right in the face (or ear): the smartphone. Here's an interesting fact about modern life: When people today act badly, other people take their pictures . And they share those pictures.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency has been secretly collecting Internet data -- almost certainly including American email traffic -- as it transits to Google and Yahoo servers abroad, according to the latest disclosure from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden . The documents, reported by the Washington Post , describe a project code-named MUSCULAR, a cooperative effort with the agency's British counterpart, GCHQ. Even though NSA has been obtaining data directly from Google and Yahoo with court orders through the previously disclosed PRISM program , the new documents show it also has been taking data without permission abroad, outside the oversight of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The secretive federal court that oversees government surveillance released a recent opinion Tuesday that explains and defends its decisions giving the National Security Agency broad power to collect the phone records of all Americans. At issue were decisions going back to 2006 that permitted the agency to order phone companies to turn over the dialing records of calls made in this country. This "metadata" did not include the names of the callers, nor did it include the content of the calls.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
Amid reports this summer of the National Security Agency's accessing troves of private communications, technology companies have sought to distance themselves from allegations of cooperation with government authorities, while reassuring users that their information is safe. The latest chapter in the face-off between the government intelligence apparatus and technology companies emerged last week with reports that the NSA was working, often successfully, to undermine encryption technology.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|