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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2007 | Susan King
Jean-Luc Godard's 1965 film, "Pierrot Le Fou," reenergized the New Wave French film pioneer. In an interview that same year with Cahiers du Cinéma, the maverick auteur said, "[T]wo or three years ago, I felt everything had been done, that there was nothing left to do today. I was, in a word, pessimistic. After 'Pierrot,' I no longer feel this." "Pierrot Le Fou," the winner of the critics' prize at the 1965 Venice Film Festival and Cahiers' No.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The limp spoof "Bubba Ho-Tep" imagines that Elvis Presley (Bruce Campbell) is alive and residing in the Shady Rest Convalescent Home in Mud Creek, Texas. It seems that, tiring of his life as the King of rock 'n' roll, he got an Elvis impersonator named Sebastian Haff to switch places with him years before his "death," which enabled him to continue performing but without the drugs, the hangers-on, the Colonel and the burdens of celebrity.
NEWS
November 28, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
AKIRA Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune were arguably the greatest director-star team in the history of the movies. Between 1948 and 1965, they made 16 films that put Japanese cinema on the international map, and established Kurosawa as an all-time great filmmaker and Mifune as Japan's greatest international star, never equaled to this day. The Nuart will present fresh 35-millimeter prints of a dozen of their films Friday through Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The Nuart today brings back Andrei Tarkovsky's beautiful and astonishing 1972 masterpiece "Solaris" for a one-week engagement in advance of the Nov. 27 opening of Steven Soderbergh's remake starring George Clooney. In 1976 the Nuart held three screenings of the most complete version of "Solaris" available at that time, and, according to the theater, this is the version that it is again presenting, although its 167-minute running time is six minutes shorter than the print it first screened.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2002
The innovative vision of the American Cinematheque's Dennis Bartok, like Landmark's Nuart Theater, is the salvation of the few remaining cineastes left here in "movieland." Dennis does himself a gross disservice by comparing the Nuart's programming (or his own) to that of the Sunset 5's. The Laemmle theaters only continue the Miramaxification (i.e., commercialization) of both American "indie" and foreign cinemas. JESSE ENGDAHL Santa Monica
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | MARK OLSEN
They used to change them almost every night. Rummaging through the back room for the right letters and numbers, the evening's ticket seller would perch on a ladder placed on the edge of busy Santa Monica Boulevard, practically in the shadow of the 405 Freeway. The titles and times on the neon-laced marquee would then be switched for the next day's new shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2002
Stephanie Black's documentary "Life and Debt," opening a one-week engagement Friday at the Nuart in West L.A., looks at the effect of globalization on Jamaican workers, including a dairy farmer, left.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002
Ingrid de Souza, left with Cesare Bocci, stars as a 19-year-old Brazilian transsexual who works as a prostitute but dreams of becoming a housewife in "Princesa," opening Friday at the Nuart in West L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tsui Hark's "Once Upon a Time in China" returns to the Nuart Friday through Monday with a new 35-milli-meter print, and at 2 hours, 14 minutes, is 22 minutes longer than the U.S.-release version. A martial arts epic directed and co-written by a master of the genre, this 1991 release is said to be the 99th retelling of the exploits of Wong Fei-Hung. This historical figure, a Canton physician and proponent of Chinese independence, became a folk hero in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late '50s and early '60s the British movie industry was hit by a New Wave of filmsfrom directors such as Tony Richardson, John Schlesinger and Lindsay Anderson. They presented an England vastly different from the prim and proper Britain that had been depicted before in films. Described as "kitchen sink" dramas, these films depicted the post-World War II working-class Britain inhabited by angry young men and women trapped in joyless jobs and relationships.
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