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Nuclear Accident

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993
As atrocity has followed atrocity in Bosnia and as the United States has seemed by painful steps to be moving toward military engagement there, more than a few Americans have wondered whether they were missing something that the Europeans were seeing. If Europe saw no peril, perhaps there was no peril to be seen.
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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the lush but irradiated pastures near the Chernobyl nuclear power station, cows are fed what U.N. officials jokingly refer to as inflated condoms. In fact, the bulbous blue capsules are filled with ferrocyanide and beeswax. In the cows' stomachs, they work like magnets to attract the radioactive cesium particles ingested along with grass, enabling the dairy herds of northern Ukraine to give uncontaminated milk.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of disaster workers cleared snow and built dams in the Siberian wilderness Thursday in an effort to clean up the radiation from Russia's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Commonwealth Television showed heavy damage at the nuclear weapons complex in the secret city of Tomsk-7, where an underground tank containing a poisonous mix of liquid nuclear waste exploded and burned Tuesday.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | Associated Press
An explosion at the Susquehanna Nuclear Plant injured two workers early Saturday, contaminating one man with radioactive dust, officials said. No radiation was released into the atmosphere, and the plant continued operating, said Jim Marsh, spokesman for the plant's owner, Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. "No danger to the public exists," Marsh said of the 9 a.m. accident, which was termed an "unusual event," the lowest level of nuclear emergency.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ukrainian parliamentary commission, concluding a sweeping probe of the Chernobyl disaster, has accused Communist leaders at the time, including Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, of a massive criminal cover-up that led to thousands of deaths. Faced with the worst accident in the history of nuclear power, Soviet authorities in April, 1986, reacted with "a total lie, falsehoods, cover-up and concealment," the commission chairman, Volodymyr Yavorivsky, said.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last year, when Lithuania led the Baltic charge for independence from the Soviet Union, Moscow cut off its outside source of electricity, leaving the rebellious republic solely dependent upon two Chernobyl-type nuclear power reactors. The thought of what could have happened is chilling even now. Without electricity from Russia, there was no backup power to operate emergency equipment at the aging facility.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | Reuters
The captain and seven crew members of the Soviet Union's first nuclear-powered submarine died of radiation poisoning after one of its reactors overheated in a hushed-up 1961 accident, according to a Soviet scientist. Georgy Kuznetsov, an engineer with the Vernadsky Research Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, said he was aboard the submarine when the accident happened in the northwest Atlantic on July 4, 1961.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | FRANZ J. HOFFMANN
The formalities at the checkpoint are unexpectedly brief. No identification is necessary, not even our heads are counted. We have entered the "forbidden" 30-kilometer zone (an area within about a 19-mile radius of the ill-fated Chernobyl nuclear reactor complex) and are now on evacuated and highly radioactively contaminated territory. Our group consists of seven scientists from five Western countries and seven Soviet colleagues.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | Reuters
The Soviet Union has told Finland of a previously unreported "serious" accident at a Leningrad nuclear power plant in 1975, a Finnish official said Friday. A breakdown in a Chernobyl-type reactor released a small amount of radioactivity, the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety said. "We are preliminarily considering it as a Class 3 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale, which means classing it as a 'serious incident,' " center official Hannu Koponen said.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said today that there were problems with U.S. nuclear artillery shells in Europe, but he said they have been fixed and there was never any danger of an accidental nuclear explosion. A published report said some experts feared a possible accidental nuclear explosion if the problems were not solved. "It is important here not to over-dramatize the nature of the problem," Cheney said. "I will simply say that . . .
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