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NEWS
January 3, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After that nightmare voyage 33 years ago, Ivan Kolokov stopped shaving. The skin on his face kept peeling off with the razor. Nikolai Zateyev, his shipmate, lay in bed 18 months while doctors replaced his bone marrow and blood. Both sailors consider themselves lucky when they remember Boris Korchilov. Korchilov was a blue-eyed, 20-year-old ladies' man. Before the voyage he was playing volleyball and flirting.
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NEWS
January 3, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After that nightmare voyage 33 years ago, Ivan Kolokov stopped shaving. The skin on his face kept peeling off with the razor. Nikolai Zateyev, his shipmate, lay in bed 18 months while doctors replaced his bone marrow and blood. Both sailors consider themselves lucky when they remember Boris Korchilov. Korchilov was a blue-eyed, 20-year-old ladies' man. Before the voyage he was playing volleyball and flirting.
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NEWS
January 30, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials, disclosing new details about a series of nuclear disasters in the Ural Mountains, have admitted that 450,000 people were contaminated by radiation from the giant Mayak atomic plant between 1948 and 1967, and that the site remains a potential hazard.
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | From Reuters
An explosion in a Siberian nuclear reprocessing plant two weeks ago caused considerable physical damage but had little effect on the environment, a U.N. expert who inspected the site said Monday. "The explosive chain reaction blew out the side wall of the plant, but there was very little toxic release and the damage to the environment was very low," said Burton Bennett of the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after radioactive steam spurted from a nuclear reactor, officials in St. Petersburg said Wednesday that there was no danger to people or the environment, but some said the accident revealed how vulnerable their city would be in a true emergency. "It is good that the danger has passed us, but if the accident had been more serious, the city would have demonstrated its total inability to cope," the chairman of St. Petersburg City Council's ecology committee, Igor Y.
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | From Reuters
An explosion in a Siberian nuclear reprocessing plant two weeks ago caused considerable physical damage but had little effect on the environment, a U.N. expert who inspected the site said Monday. "The explosive chain reaction blew out the side wall of the plant, but there was very little toxic release and the damage to the environment was very low," said Burton Bennett of the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was about three years ago in this ramshackle Siberian farming and mink-breeding town that the Yellow Children began to appear. After hospital treatment, the jaundice that turns some newborns here a dull yellow eventually disappears. But it is not their only problem, for these infants also show signs of congenital defects in their nervous system and organs. They begin to walk later than other children, are oddly silent and have a vocabulary that remains infantile far too long, doctors say.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials said Wednesday that although the explosion in a vat of atomic waste at a secret Siberian complex could be considered the country's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl, it was tiny in comparison. "You simply cannot liken it to Chernobyl," Nuclear Energy Ministry spokesman Georgy Kaurov told reporters. "About 80 million curies of radioactivity were released at Chernobyl. Here, we do not have even a single curie. So it is 80 million times less."
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Moscow Bureau researcher Steven Gutterman
1948--Furiously driven by Lavrenty P. Beria, head of the secret police, the Soviet Union's crash program to build an atomic bomb scores its first real success when production of radioactive isotopes starts in a secret complex near the Ural Mountains city of Chelyabinsk. Aug. 29, 1949--Test of the first Soviet nuclear weapon (nicknamed by the Americans "Joe One"--after Josef Stalin) at Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. Fallout is carried by winds into neighboring Altai territory of Russia.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody told the villagers why the fish in the river turned blind. Or why bulldozers showed up one day to plow under the road. So, they continued to cut hay in the meadows. When these peasants were forced by soldiers to leave their cottages in the Urals, they still didn't get a frank explanation. And even when they began to die, they were not told the truth. The history of the Soviet nuclear program is one of both great scientific prowess and vast human suffering.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
An explosion at a secret Siberian nuclear weapons complex contaminated an area more than three times greater than previously thought, the latest official estimate said Monday. At the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, meanwhile, the No. 1 reactor was shut down Monday because of a malfunctioning turbine engine, the Itar-Tass news agency said. Head engineer Viktor Vasilchenko said there was no danger of radiation leaks.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of disaster workers cleared snow and built dams in the Siberian wilderness Thursday in an effort to clean up the radiation from Russia's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Commonwealth Television showed heavy damage at the nuclear weapons complex in the secret city of Tomsk-7, where an underground tank containing a poisonous mix of liquid nuclear waste exploded and burned Tuesday.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials said Wednesday that although the explosion in a vat of atomic waste at a secret Siberian complex could be considered the country's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl, it was tiny in comparison. "You simply cannot liken it to Chernobyl," Nuclear Energy Ministry spokesman Georgy Kaurov told reporters. "About 80 million curies of radioactivity were released at Chernobyl. Here, we do not have even a single curie. So it is 80 million times less."
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | Associated Press
A tank of radioactive waste exploded and burned Tuesday at a weapons plant in the Siberian city of Tomsk-7, contaminating 2,500 acres and exposing firefighters to dangerous levels of radiation, Russian officials said. It was unclear how much radiation was released in the accident or how many people might be affected.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials, disclosing new details about a series of nuclear disasters in the Ural Mountains, have admitted that 450,000 people were contaminated by radiation from the giant Mayak atomic plant between 1948 and 1967, and that the site remains a potential hazard.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Moscow Bureau researcher Steven Gutterman
1948--Furiously driven by Lavrenty P. Beria, head of the secret police, the Soviet Union's crash program to build an atomic bomb scores its first real success when production of radioactive isotopes starts in a secret complex near the Ural Mountains city of Chelyabinsk. Aug. 29, 1949--Test of the first Soviet nuclear weapon (nicknamed by the Americans "Joe One"--after Josef Stalin) at Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. Fallout is carried by winds into neighboring Altai territory of Russia.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of disaster workers cleared snow and built dams in the Siberian wilderness Thursday in an effort to clean up the radiation from Russia's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Commonwealth Television showed heavy damage at the nuclear weapons complex in the secret city of Tomsk-7, where an underground tank containing a poisonous mix of liquid nuclear waste exploded and burned Tuesday.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
An explosion at a secret Siberian nuclear weapons complex contaminated an area more than three times greater than previously thought, the latest official estimate said Monday. At the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, meanwhile, the No. 1 reactor was shut down Monday because of a malfunctioning turbine engine, the Itar-Tass news agency said. Head engineer Viktor Vasilchenko said there was no danger of radiation leaks.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody told the villagers why the fish in the river turned blind. Or why bulldozers showed up one day to plow under the road. So, they continued to cut hay in the meadows. When these peasants were forced by soldiers to leave their cottages in the Urals, they still didn't get a frank explanation. And even when they began to die, they were not told the truth. The history of the Soviet nuclear program is one of both great scientific prowess and vast human suffering.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was about three years ago in this ramshackle Siberian farming and mink-breeding town that the Yellow Children began to appear. After hospital treatment, the jaundice that turns some newborns here a dull yellow eventually disappears. But it is not their only problem, for these infants also show signs of congenital defects in their nervous system and organs. They begin to walk later than other children, are oddly silent and have a vocabulary that remains infantile far too long, doctors say.
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