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NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Moscow Bureau researcher Steven Gutterman
1948--Furiously driven by Lavrenty P. Beria, head of the secret police, the Soviet Union's crash program to build an atomic bomb scores its first real success when production of radioactive isotopes starts in a secret complex near the Ural Mountains city of Chelyabinsk. Aug. 29, 1949--Test of the first Soviet nuclear weapon (nicknamed by the Americans "Joe One"--after Josef Stalin) at Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. Fallout is carried by winds into neighboring Altai territory of Russia.
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NEWS
March 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station, the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, will be phased out of operation over the next five years and then permanently closed under a decision announced Friday by authorities in the Ukraine, one of the Soviet Union's constituent republics.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody told the villagers why the fish in the river turned blind. Or why bulldozers showed up one day to plow under the road. So, they continued to cut hay in the meadows. When these peasants were forced by soldiers to leave their cottages in the Urals, they still didn't get a frank explanation. And even when they began to die, they were not told the truth. The history of the Soviet nuclear program is one of both great scientific prowess and vast human suffering.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. experts are concerned that a nuclear accident similar to the Chernobyl catastrophe will occur in the Soviet Union in the next five years and will undermine efforts to promote nuclear power in the United States, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Wednesday. The Soviet Union still has 16 nuclear reactors of the type involved in the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe, and their operations are "frightening," Watkins told Times reporters and editors at a breakfast session.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Satellite photographs showing the site of a Soviet nuclear accident said to have occurred in 1957--but never acknowledged by Moscow--were published by a Swedish space research company. The computer-enhanced images showed that a 100-square-mile area around a military nuclear complex east of the Ural Mountains was still abandoned three decades after the disaster. About 30 villages that appeared on pre-1950 maps were overgrown or destroyed.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | From Reuters
A Soviet lawmaker said Wednesday that about 300 people--10 times the official figure--had died from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and that the cost of cleanup, resettlement and medical care could be as high as $416 billion. Yuri Shcherbak, a well-known Ukrainian author who has written a book on Chernobyl, said the death toll was calculated by a public organization called the Chernobyl Union, formed recently in the republic.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet parliamentary delegation, decrying the secrecy their government imposed after the Chernobyl nuclear accident four years ago, made an urgent appeal to the United States and the world Friday for help in dealing with towering medical and other problems.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From Reuters
A pregnant women who defied orders to evacuate the danger zone surrounding the damaged Chernobyl nuclear plant in 1986 gave birth to an apparently normal girl there last year, a Soviet newspaper revealed Friday. The trade union daily Trud said Yelena Chervinskaya, then 24, arrived in Chernobyl on the second day after the accident as part of a youth work brigade. Attracted by the good pay she stayed, working first as a cook and then as the director of a hostel. Then she became pregnant.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | Moscow Bureau researcher Steven Gutterman
1948--Furiously driven by Lavrenty P. Beria, head of the secret police, the Soviet Union's crash program to build an atomic bomb scores its first real success when production of radioactive isotopes starts in a secret complex near the Ural Mountains city of Chelyabinsk. Aug. 29, 1949--Test of the first Soviet nuclear weapon (nicknamed by the Americans "Joe One"--after Josef Stalin) at Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. Fallout is carried by winds into neighboring Altai territory of Russia.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. experts are concerned that a nuclear accident similar to the Chernobyl catastrophe will occur in the Soviet Union in the next five years and will undermine efforts to promote nuclear power in the United States, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Wednesday. The Soviet Union still has 16 nuclear reactors of the type involved in the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe, and their operations are "frightening," Watkins told Times reporters and editors at a breakfast session.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doors bang with the wind. Fences have fallen around the village's stout houses. The post office, the school, the community center are all padlocked. And yellowed weeds, some shoulder high, wave in the fields where Bartalomeyevka's farmers grew rye, potatoes and vegetables. Bartalomeyevka is a modern ghost town--it was killed by radiation.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An explosion and fire at a nuclear fuel production plant in the Soviet Far East injured several people and threatened to contaminate the region's air and water, the official Tass news agency said. The blast in Kazakhstan sent gas clouds over a region near the Soviet borders with Mongolia and China. Tass said an explosion ripped through the Ulba plant's cellar workshop producing beryllium, a highly toxic heavy metal used to fuel nuclear reactors.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet parliamentary delegation, decrying the secrecy their government imposed after the Chernobyl nuclear accident four years ago, made an urgent appeal to the United States and the world Friday for help in dealing with towering medical and other problems.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet pilot suffering a pre-cancerous condition because of his heroic flights to staunch radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear plant underwent a transplant of bone marrow rushed from a French donor on Friday. Four years and a day after the Chernobyl disaster, marrow donated by a 42-year-old woman was flown to Seattle on Friday for transfusion into Anatoly Grishchenko. The marrow arrived at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on a British Airways flight originating in Paris.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody told the villagers why the fish in the river turned blind. Or why bulldozers showed up one day to plow under the road. So, they continued to cut hay in the meadows. When these peasants were forced by soldiers to leave their cottages in the Urals, they still didn't get a frank explanation. And even when they began to die, they were not told the truth. The history of the Soviet nuclear program is one of both great scientific prowess and vast human suffering.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An explosion and fire at a nuclear fuel production plant in the Soviet Far East injured several people and threatened to contaminate the region's air and water, the official Tass news agency said. The blast in Kazakhstan sent gas clouds over a region near the Soviet borders with Mongolia and China. Tass said an explosion ripped through the Ulba plant's cellar workshop producing beryllium, a highly toxic heavy metal used to fuel nuclear reactors.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | From Reuters
A Soviet lawmaker said Wednesday that about 300 people--10 times the official figure--had died from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and that the cost of cleanup, resettlement and medical care could be as high as $416 billion. Yuri Shcherbak, a well-known Ukrainian author who has written a book on Chernobyl, said the death toll was calculated by a public organization called the Chernobyl Union, formed recently in the republic.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station, the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, will be phased out of operation over the next five years and then permanently closed under a decision announced Friday by authorities in the Ukraine, one of the Soviet Union's constituent republics.
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