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Nuclear Arms Race

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1986 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter is director of European studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies at Georgetown University
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it." This is one of Ronald Reagan's favorite slogans. To this must be added another: "If it ain't broke, don't break it." By this standard it is hard to fathom the President's decision to cease compliance with the SALT II treaty later this year. Arms control has never been this Administration's first priority. Thus its top Pentagon expert is only a middle-level political appointee. In the State Department--save for Paul H.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
To know where you are, it helps to know where you've been, right? So early in his deeply reported, deeply frightening story of America's massive nuclear arsenal, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," investigative reporter Eric Schlosser takes us back to World War II and the Manhattan Project. The day after the "Trinity" test in the desert of New Mexico, dozens of scientists who had worked on the bomb signed a petition addressed to President Harry S. Truman.
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MAGAZINE
November 17, 1985 | Robert Scheer and Tim Rutten, Robert Scheer is a Times staff writer; Tim Rutten is an assistant national editor at The Times
Roger M. Mahony, 49, the newly appointed archbishop of Los Angeles, oversees the largest Roman Catholic community in the United States. As the outspoken bishop of Stockton, he gained a national reputation for his role in formulating the bishops' widely debated pastoral letter condemning the nuclear arms race, in 1983, as well as the forthcoming pastoral on economic justice. This is his first interview since his appointment. Q: What are the key social issues at the top of your agenda?
OPINION
March 7, 2012
It's not clear that Israel is convinced, but President Obama deserves credit for his forceful argument that the Jewish state shouldn't precipitously attack Iran's nuclear program. He has also effectively rebuked American politicians, including his Republican rivals, for "beating the drums of war. " At the same time, Obama has committed the United States to a "military effort" to block a nuclear weapon - a newly muscular formulation of his long-standing commitment to take no option off the table.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Representatives of six nations will meet here in June to push for an end to the nuclear arms race, the government news agency Notimex reported. It said that officials from Mexico, Argentina, Sweden, Greece, Tanzania and India will participate in the meeting to urge President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to stop the arms race. The group was formed by the six heads of government in 1984 and met in New Delhi in January, 1985, for its first conference seeking an end to nuclear
BOOKS
October 14, 2007 | Nicholas Thompson, Nicholas Thompson, a senior editor at Wired magazine, is writing a book about Paul Nitze and George Kennan.
The history of the world came down to this. Ronald Reagan is standing in a room in Iceland with three men: Richard Perle, the young hawk; Paul Nitze, the old sage; George Shultz, the steady counsel. Mikhail Gorbachev is upstairs. "Everything could be decided right now," Gorbachev mutters as he paces. The four Americans are discussing a massive arms-control deal, and right now it depends on minutiae.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The United States and the Soviet Union launch a new beginning here Tuesday in the permanent search for nuclear understanding, but the arms race may already now be passing a point of no return beyond which neither side will any longer have the political will or readiness to agree on new limits or controls. In the six years since the last arms control agreement was signed in Vienna by Presidents Jimmy Carter and Leonid I.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When India detonated five nuclear devices this month, Washington was not the only one caught off guard: Shock waves reverberated through the Middle East, and some now fear that the nuclear arms race in South Asia could spread to the world's most volatile region. The idea that a developing nation such as India could safely defy the United States--and world sentiment--by acquiring and testing nuclear weapons thrilled many Arab intellectuals.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan said today that her country does not have nuclear weapons, will not build them and will not "provoke a nuclear arms race" on the subcontinent it shares with rival India. In an address to Congress, Bhutto also urged the United States to continue military and economic aid to Pakistan. Applause repeatedly punctuated her speech and it was loudest and most prolonged when she said her nation does not intend to become a nuclear-weapons power and will work with the United States to "prevent the catastrophe of a nuclear arms race in south Asia."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Seattle Catholic Archbishop Raymond Hunthausen said the Internal Revenue Service has garnisheed his salary because he has refused to pay half his personal income tax in a protest of the nuclear arms race. In a letter released recently, the archbishop said he was docked a total of $813.53 last fall for taxes owed for 1982 and 1983. The archbishop received nationwide attention for withholding 50% of his personal income tax in those years in a protest against continued U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The concluding volume in the magisterial historical tetralogy Richard Rhodes calls "The Making of the Nuclear Age" bears a weighty subtitle that hints at its somewhat discursive nature. "The Twilight of the Bombs: Recent Challenges, New Dangers, and the Prospects for a World Without Nuclear Weapons" also is perhaps the most journalistic (though Rhodes always has been as dogged a reporter as he is a researcher) and prescriptive of the volumes in this remarkable series. That series began with the Pulitzer Prize-winning "The Making of the Atomic Bomb," one of the rare accounts of atomic origins praised by physicists, historians and politicians of both parties alike.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
At the center of a desolate valley in the middle of Nevada, more than a dozen miles from the nearest paved road, one of the few signs of human activity is a rusty steel well casing that juts oddly out of the desert floor. Nobody lives here, but it has a name: the Central Nevada Test Area. It was once a hub of scientific activity. Today, it is an abandoned outpost of the Cold War. In the lore of the nuclear arms race, the Central Nevada Test Area has occupied a special place of mystery.
BOOKS
October 14, 2007 | Nicholas Thompson, Nicholas Thompson, a senior editor at Wired magazine, is writing a book about Paul Nitze and George Kennan.
The history of the world came down to this. Ronald Reagan is standing in a room in Iceland with three men: Richard Perle, the young hawk; Paul Nitze, the old sage; George Shultz, the steady counsel. Mikhail Gorbachev is upstairs. "Everything could be decided right now," Gorbachev mutters as he paces. The four Americans are discussing a massive arms-control deal, and right now it depends on minutiae.
OPINION
January 19, 2006
Re "Bush, Merkel United on Iran," Jan. 14 It should not be any surprise that North Korea and Iran want to arm themselves with nuclear weapons since President Bush named Iraq, North Korea and Iran the "axis of evil" and then proceeded to invade Iraq. Should we not expect them to protect their countries when we have stockpiles of nuclear weapons and we are the only country in the world to have used them? Does it occur to Bush that we should offer to divest ourselves of nuclear weapons if these countries do likewise?
OPINION
February 27, 2005 | Stephen F. Cohen, Stephen F. Cohen, professor of Russian studies at New York University, is the author (with Katrina vanden Heuvel) of "Voices of Glasnost: Conversations With Gorbachev's Reformers" (W.W Norton, 1990) and, most recently, of "Failed Crusade: America and the Tragedy of Post-Communist Russia" (W.W. Norton, 2001).
The most important events of the late 20th century began to unfold nearly 20 years ago on March 11, 1985, when Mikhail S. Gorbachev became leader of the Soviet Union. Within a few weeks of his rise to power, the full-scale reformation he hoped to carry out inside his country and in its Cold War relations with the West was underway.
OPINION
April 27, 2004
"Still on Catastrophe's Edge" (Commentary, April 26) ended with the comment that "a clear road map for nuclear disarmament should be established." The road map is in Article VI of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. It calls for an end to the nuclear arms race, nuclear disarmament and general and complete disarmament "under strict and effective international control." President Kennedy presented the American-Soviet (McCloy-Zorin) program to achieve that goal in his address to the United Nations on Sept.
NEWS
September 22, 1985
Weary delegates from 130 countries completed a stormy review of the nuclear non-proliferation treaty in Geneva by unanimously adopting a report that said the quest for disarmament and an end to testing "remained unfulfilled." The review conference of the 1970 treaty concluded after an all-night session in which feuding between Gulf War foes Iran and Iraq threatened to block a consensus on the report. It urged greater efforts to end the nuclear arms race.
OPINION
December 20, 1987
The INF accord got universal acclaim and approval simply because it represents a symbolic first step of the hitherto insane nuclear arms race. Credit is due not only to those directly involved in the INF pact, but also to all the peace activists like the older people willing to be arrested at Las Vegas test sites for the sake of younger generations. Why not hold off the sticky issue of the strategic defense initiative for the time being and concentrate on more important issues like appointing a neutral scientific body to work out and the resolve complex problems of START verification and compromise?
WORLD
September 9, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Once bitter foes, India and Israel plan to strengthen their defense, intelligence and trade ties when Ariel Sharon attends a summit here today in the first official visit by an Israeli prime minister. Although Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee and Sharon are expected to sign a joint declaration on drug trafficking, the environment and other issues, the most significant deals are likely to be negotiated behind the scenes.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Democrats on Tuesday accused the Bush administration of risking a new arms race as the Senate endorsed a Pentagon plan to end a 10-year ban on research and development of a new generation of tactical nuclear bombs. The charge drew a sharp denial from Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, who asserted that the Pentagon only wants to study new weapons that could help the United States destroy caches of chemical and biological weapons or other targets deep underground.
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