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Nuclear Disarmament

ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1986 | CHALON SMITH
I can light a sun in your backyard as you can light a sun in mine. But I will never do it to you even under any provocation for any reason. --Helen and Newton Harrison's inscription on their painted photograph of an atomic explosion. The Harrisons' tender, almost childlike plea for nuclear restraint illuminates what's at the heart of "Disarming Images: Art for Nuclear Disarmament," an exhibit that opened Thursday and runs through April 5 at the UC Irvine Fine Arts Gallery.
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NEWS
October 14, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the New Mexican desert during World War II, young Polish physicist Joseph Rotblat worked on the Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. Ever since, he has campaigned tirelessly and often controversially to keep the genie of mass destruction from escaping again. On Friday, Rotblat and the loose association of maverick scientists he heads divided the million-dollar 1995 Nobel Peace Prize.
OPINION
January 12, 1992 | Gar Alperovitz and Kai Bird, Gar Alperovitz, author of "Atomic Diplomacy: Hiroshima and Potsdam" (Penguin) is a senior fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies. Kai Bird, author of a coming biography of John J. McCloy, is a research associate at the Institute for Policy Studies.
As the Soviet empire unravels, it is ever more obvious that the only real threat to U.S. national security is nuclear proliferation. It is quite possible that such new republics as Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus will retain nuclear technology, and that expertise could be sold to the highest bidder on a global black market. Last fall, President George Bush announced a series of unilateral cuts in the U.S. nuclear arsenal and Moscow reciprocated with similar reductions.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Diplomatic smiles and champagne toasts greeted the Clinton Administration's decision to fatten this nation's nuclear disarmament account by $100 million more, as announced during Defense Secretary William J. Perry's visit here this week.
MAGAZINE
September 6, 1987 | Jack Smith
MY FORMER COLLEAGUE, John McSweeney, retired after 40 years in the journalism business, hopes to return to earth 50 years after he dies and ask a few questions about the state of things. I am not psychic, but the answers to McSweeney's questions seem obvious to me. He plans to come back on only a 24-hour liberty. Assuming that it will be nicer where he is coming back from than it will be here, I am hoping to save him the trip by answering his questions now. Q: Is the world more civilized? A: No.
WORLD
February 11, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and David Pierson
BEIJING -- North Korea appeared to conduct a nuclear test Tuesday in defiance of world powers, South Korean officials said, following through on the provocative step after weeks of threats. South Korea said it had detected a man-made seismic event across its northern border. “South Korean National Weather Service confirmed an artificial earthquake of 4.9 magnitude,” said Kim Min-seok, a spokesman for the South Korean Defense Ministry. Kim said the blast was measured at 6 to 7 kilotons.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Corp. and two other companies that helped supply the Defense Department with nuclear missiles during the decades-long arms race have formed a joint venture company that aims to become the leader in the race for contracts to dismantle many American and Soviet-built nuclear weapons. Lockheed, which has manufactured ballistic missiles, and its partners--explosives producer Olin Corp.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | IRIS YOKOI
A Gardena construction firm is helping disarm Russia. Early next month, G&C Equipment, which sells and leases construction equipment, will send machinery and two employees to Russia to help that nation dismantle its nuclear weapons. The U.S. Department of Defense awarded G&C a $3.1-million contract to supply the heavy construction equipment and send employees to train Russian workers on how to use the machinery.
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