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BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For the first time since Japan's nuclear disaster last year, seafood caught off the Fukushima coastline is being sold in local markets to test customer demand. On Monday, two types of octopus and one variety of marine snail deemed clear of radioactive cesium were on sale, often at deep discounts, according to the Fukushima Prefecture fishing cooperative. Contamination worries still persist concerning fish, which aren't yet ready for consumption, according to Japanese media reports.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | From Bloomberg News
Masao Yoshida, the plant manager who led the fight to bring Japan's Fukushima atomic station under control during the 2011 nuclear disaster, has died. He was 58. He died Tuesday of esophagus cancer at a Tokyo hospital, according to a statement from Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The illness was unrelated to the radiation exposure after the nuclear accident, according to the company. Yoshida, an engineer by training, directed workers to stop the reactors from overheating after Japan's strongest earthquake on record and an ensuing tsunami hit the plant on March 11, 2011, causing the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.
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NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The 9.0-magnitude Tohoku-Oki earthquake and resulting tsunami that triggered a meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station has resulted in only a small increase in lifetime cancer risks for people living nearby, and an even smaller risk for populations outside of Japan, according to a new report from the World Health Organization. The uptick in disease resulting from radiation released by the wrecked plant is “likely to remain below detectable levels,” the study authors concluded in their 166-page report, released Thursday.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
After the cascade of disasters that befell Japan 27 months ago, then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan took the brunt of withering criticism for shoddy nuclear safety standards at the crippled Fukushima reactor complex and the government's chaotic emergency response to the crises. Kan also took away a life-altering lesson. A longtime proponent of nuclear energy for his densely populated, resource-poor nation, the government leader who resigned in disgrace five months after the March 11, 2011, earthquake-triggered tsunami and nuclear disaster is now at the forefront of Japan's movement to phase out atomic power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1986
My God! Of the 16 nuclear power plant accidents reported in The Times chronology (April 30), 12 occurred in the United States . . . . Do we really know what is happening around us? DICK HENKE San Pedro
SCIENCE
March 8, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The levels of radioactive plutonium around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant aren't much higher than the amount of plutonium remaining in the environment from Cold War-era nuclear weapons tests, and it probably poses little threat to humans, a new study indicates. The paper, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, examines the area within a roughly 20-mile radius of the stricken plant and details the concentration of plutonium isotopes deposited there after explosions ripped open multiple reactors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2005 | AL MARTINEZ
AS I understand it, the reason for the power outage earlier this week was that someone cut the wrong wires. While undertaking the domestic equivalent of plugging in a toaster, he snipped the cable that supplied power to a good part of Los Angeles, fouling traffic, silencing daytime television and muting my e-mail system. That hurt. The electrical failure came on the heels of Monday's column in which I was critical of the president's efforts in the area devastated by Hurricane Katrina.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN
"Today there are over 400 nuclear power stations throughout the world and also 50,000 nuclear warheads. Each nuclear bomb represents an equivalent of 10 stations. We have 500,400 potential Chernobyls. Such is the face of the Atomic Age." Vladimir Gubaryev made that statement to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council the other day. More than half a million Chernobyls waiting to happen! Think about it. Hard to do. The mind resists big numbers, especially when they have unpleasant connotations.
NEWS
May 3, 1986 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Pressure has begun to build for an international agreement that would force governments to share information in the event of a nuclear power plant disaster, officials at the International Atomic Energy Agency said Friday. While there are several such binding agreements between individual nations that require a country to give immediate, extensive detail on a nuclear accident, the internationally accepted guidelines set out by the IAEA are legally unenforceable.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Marine biologist Dan Madigan stood on a dock in San Diego and considered some freshly caught Pacific bluefin tuna. The fish had managed to swim 5,000 miles from their spawning grounds near Japan to California's shores, only to end up the catch of local fishermen. It was August 2011, five months since a magnitude 9 earthquake and tsunami had struck in Japan, crippling the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Madigan couldn't stop thinking about pictures he'd seen on TV of Japanese emergency crews dumping radioactive water from the failing reactors into the Pacific Ocean.
SCIENCE
March 1, 2013 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
The 9.0-magnitude Tohoku-Oki earthquake and resulting tsunami that triggered a meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station has resulted in only a small increase in lifetime cancer risks for people living nearby, and an even smaller risk for populations outside of Japan, according to a new report from the World Health Organization. The uptick in disease resulting from radiation released by the crippled plant is "likely to remain below detectable levels," the study authors concluded in their 166-page report released Thursday.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The 9.0-magnitude Tohoku-Oki earthquake and resulting tsunami that triggered a meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station has resulted in only a small increase in lifetime cancer risks for people living nearby, and an even smaller risk for populations outside of Japan, according to a new report from the World Health Organization. The uptick in disease resulting from radiation released by the wrecked plant is “likely to remain below detectable levels,” the study authors concluded in their 166-page report, released Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012
Who will be playing in the next Super Bowl won't be known for another three months, but CBS has already decided what show it will air once the final gun for the big game sounds. Getting one of the most sought after spots in television is CBS' drama "Elementary," which stars Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu as a modern-day Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. The show made its premiere this fall and has been a solid performer for CBS. The game will air on Feb. 3. The Super Bowl is the most-watched program in the United States every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Diana Thater's post-apocalyptic video installation "Chernobyl" has been shown a few times, but never in a setting that itself is raw with destruction: On Friday, her 2011 work about the Soviet town devastated and depopulated by the 1986 nuclear disaster opens at David Zwirner, one of the New York galleries hit hardest by flooding from Hurricane Sandy. The six-channel video features images of Chernobyl buildings in disrepair, ending with horses galloping around the remains of the nuclear power plant and swans swimming in the cooling pond.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For the first time since Japan's nuclear disaster last year, seafood caught off the Fukushima coastline is being sold in local markets to test customer demand. On Monday, two types of octopus and one variety of marine snail deemed clear of radioactive cesium were on sale, often at deep discounts, according to the Fukushima Prefecture fishing cooperative. Contamination worries still persist concerning fish, which aren't yet ready for consumption, according to Japanese media reports.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Provocative opinion pieces from newspapers around the globe: Michael Gerson in the Washington Post has an interesting take on President Obama's 2012 campaign, which is clearly devoid of the inspirational sparks he ignited in 2008. To Gerson, the "brand" of the Obama campaign is ruthlessness, the kind of class-based, divisive techniques that could be used by any liberal politician. That seems surprising and disappointing, coming from a guy who used to represent hope and change.
WORLD
March 11, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Veteran fish seller Yoshito Shimada is under siege. At a grocery store in Tokyo's Shibuya district, mothers pushing strollers demand proof that the daily catch isn't from the waters off the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. "I tell them the government checks the fish for radiation, but they don't trust elected officials, or anyone," said Shimada, his blue shirt stained with fish blood. "A year after the disaster, Japan is still afraid of its own food. " Even in Tokyo, more than 200 miles from the northeastern region devastated by the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami that caused radiation to spew from the nuclear plant, residents fear that local schoolyards are laced with dangerous isotopes.
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