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Nuclear Family

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2001 | MATTHEW SHEPATIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playing armchair shrink on a Thursday night is now a ritual for millions of regular television viewers. Degrees are dusted off and hung on living room walls, as audiences around the country sit back and carefully analyze each contestant on CBS' "Survivor" as if they were patients on their own couches. I personally should send Jerri, the aspiring L.A. actress/accomplished outback bad girl, a bill for all the hours I've logged examining her dysfunction. Over the weeks, they've formed alliances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2011 | Kate Linthicum and Ari Bloomekatz and Scott Gold
On a leafy drive in west Los Angeles, at a newly renovated home with cathedral ceilings and a backyard pool, 4-year-old Kate Eisenpresser-Davis' friends have been known to pose an intriguing question: "Why does Kate have three mommies?" Lisa Eisenpresser, 44, and her partner, Angela Courtin, 38, share custody of Kate with Eisenpresser's ex-partner. When asked to describe their life, Eisenpresser and Courtin respond with the same word: "Normal. " Days are spent searching for the right balance between work and home, and zigzagging through Mar Vista to meetings, school and gymnastics.
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OPINION
September 18, 1994 | Stanley Crouch, Stanley Crouch, author of "Notes of a Hanging Judge" (Oxford), was a 1993 recipient of the MacArthur Foundation "genius" fellowship. He is currently finishing a biography of Charlie Parker
It isn't unusual to hear the idea and the history of the nuclear family either elevated to an Olympian condition of domestic paradise or vilified as the source of all early and enduring prob lems. If one is listening to a proponent of the family, it is described as an answer to the problems that so pervade the cultural, political, social and spiritual lives of Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
In a state where the dynamics of marriage, family and home are shifting, Orange County remains a "vestige of tradition," as one sociologist put it. Analysts, however, say the county's loyalty to convention is not due to a push to maintain its image as a pillar of social conservatism. Instead, they point to the bustling Latino commercial districts in Santa Ana, the Vietnamese American coffee shops in Garden Grove and the halal butchers in Anaheim — to an influx of immigrants who have imported the old-fashioned family structures of their homelands.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The nuclear family of yesteryear--mom and dad living with each other and their biological children--may not be as endangered as it sometimes seems. The percentage of children living in these traditional families rose during the early 1990s. At the same time, other families became increasingly complex, with more stepparents, grandparents and adoptive parents raising children, the Census Bureau says in a report being released today.
NEWS
November 11, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
All those kinship diagrams--the ones that make families look like Mendel's peas--are due for major revamping. Changing living arrangements, spurred primarily by the realities of divorce, are calling for a reassessment of the very notion of family. And, USC professor of social work Constance Ahrons said, the redefined family demands not only a renegotiated life style, but a new code of behavior as well.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Michael Szymanski writes regularly for Valley Life
Family portraits in the San Fernando Valley are constantly changing. More and more families are breaking the two-parent, 2.3-kid mold. It's not uncommon to have a father in west Van Nuys who is moving his plumbing business to his home so he can care for his two girls. Or a grandmother in Lake View Terrace who has custody of her granddaughter. Or a Sylmar couple who are struggling to raise 11 children--although many aren't their own.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ferdinand Mount endeavors in this volume to suggest that of all the social systems known to man--public and private--the nuclear family has always been paramount. The big question is, why would he pick this particular thesis for a (moderately) scholarly book? No clues are given on the book jacket. We do know this: Ferdinand Mount is the editor of the London Times Literary Supplement. He writes from a particular position: By The World he means Western Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
How can you say no to "The House of Yes"? It is funny, grotesque, impudent, a little chilling and streaked with satire--all elements that recommend it. But the Wendy MacLeod play that opened Tuesday at the Las Palmas Theatre in Hollywood (the perfect house in the perfect spot) is also tamer than expected, more struck with lunacy than danger. Perhaps instead of yes, one should say maybe.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a familiar message, echoed on television, in Census Bureau reports and in the conventional wisdom of our culture: The two-parent family is in decline. But is it? Some of the newest evidence suggests that the tidal flow away from two-parent families peaked years ago and may even be starting to change course. And the strongest hints of a change in behavior are emerging from low-income and minority communities, groups that have paid the greatest price for the family breakdown since the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Neal Gabler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With the new television season upon us, here are a few things you are virtually certain to see again and again and again: lots of folks spending the better part of their day surrounded by their friends and family in happy conviviality; folks wandering into the unlocked apartments and homes of friends, family and neighbors at any time of the day or night as if this were the most natural thing in the world; friends and family sitting down and having lots...
NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
This little town in the red-rock bluffs of southern Utah ought to be predictable. Nearly 97% of the 3,500 residents are white. About 80% voted for President Bush in the last election. Many families trace their roots back five generations, to the Mormon pioneers who laid out the town in the 1870s with wide streets, a prudent irrigation system -- and, as a historical account noted, "not a grog shop or gambling saloon or dance hall" to be found.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | Cheryl Wittenauer, Associated Press Writer
When Denise Brock sat with her cancer-stricken dad in the 1960s, she made lots of racket, hoping that the noise would prevent his dying on her watch. Today, Brock, 43, is clamoring all the louder, a full-time activist on behalf of aging Cold War-era nuclear workers and their survivors. "I'm obsessed with this," she said. "If I don't help them, who's going to?" A 3-year-old federal law requires the U.S.
WORLD
July 18, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legal recognition of same-sex marriages presents no threat to heterosexual couples, Germany's Constitutional Court ruled Wednesday in a blow to conservatives who have waged a campaign for traditional family values in this emotionally charged election season. Conservatives in the three states that challenged the year-old gay marriage law conceded defeat but continued to loudly lament what they see as deterioration of official support for the nuclear family. Bavarian Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mary Palevsky, ground zero wasn't a remote test site in far off New Mexico but the living room of her Long Island home. It was there as a 9-year-old, confronted by photographs of the first atomic blast, that she began asking her parents what they did during the war. She was troubled by the answers--answers that led to a book and now a major Japanese documentary. For the past month, a camera crew from the nationally-owned Japan Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a familiar message, echoed on television, in Census Bureau reports and in the conventional wisdom of our culture: The two-parent family is in decline. But is it? Some of the newest evidence suggests that the tidal flow away from two-parent families peaked years ago and may even be starting to change course. And the strongest hints of a change in behavior are emerging from low-income and minority communities, groups that have paid the greatest price for the family breakdown since the 1960s.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The nuclear family of yesteryear--mom and dad living with each other and their biological children--may not be as endangered as it sometimes seems. The percentage of children living in these traditional families rose during the early 1990s. At the same time, other families became increasingly complex, with more stepparents, grandparents and adoptive parents raising children, the Census Bureau says in a report being released today.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The American family is not dead or even in trouble. Rather it has metamorphosed and is better than ever. These conclusions come from a 26-year study of 300 Los Angeles families. Vern L. Bengston, distinguished scholar with the American Sociological Assn. and USC sociologist, has released his findings in the "Longitudinal Study of Generations," garnering an award for outstanding research to be presented Nov. 17 by the Washington-based Gerontological Society of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2001 | MATTHEW SHEPATIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playing armchair shrink on a Thursday night is now a ritual for millions of regular television viewers. Degrees are dusted off and hung on living room walls, as audiences around the country sit back and carefully analyze each contestant on CBS' "Survivor" as if they were patients on their own couches. I personally should send Jerri, the aspiring L.A. actress/accomplished outback bad girl, a bill for all the hours I've logged examining her dysfunction. Over the weeks, they've formed alliances.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The nuclear family of yesteryear--mom and dad living with each other and their biological children--may not be as endangered as it sometimes seems. The percentage of children living in these traditional families rose during the early 1990s. At the same time, other families became increasingly complex, with more stepparents, grandparents and adoptive parents raising children, the Census Bureau says in a report being released today.
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