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Nuclear Family

NEWS
June 12, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
It's all in the family--wrenching conflicts between responsibilities at home and workplace demands, disintegrating support systems and, for the first time, the specter of the next generation being downwardly mobile. That was the message from the Legislature's year-old Joint Select Task Force on the Changing Family, whose first report, "Planning a Family Policy for California," was presented by co-chairs, State Sen. Diane E. Watson and Assemblyman Thomas H. Bates. The California family is in trouble and the report is "an urgent call to action," Watson said at a breakfast Friday in Beverly Hills.
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NEWS
November 4, 1995 | Associated Press
A nuclear power plant that frightened Germans as it was being built will thrill them now that it's finished. A Dutch investor plans to turn the never-used Kalkar nuclear reactor complex into an amusement park, perhaps using the plant's cooling towers to hold up a roller coaster. Nuclear Water Wonderland will feature rides, water sports, movie theaters, restaurants and a 2,000-bed hotel, says amusement park builder Henny van der Most.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
The conference in Ontario was billed as a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Social Security Act of 1935, which mandated the nation's first permanent maternal and child health program. But concerns addressed by the speakers would have been incomprehensible 50 years ago in a nation marking the end of Prohibition and mourning Will Rogers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1987 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
In the final session of the National Council for Families and Television's annual conference, Dr. Ella Taylor of the University of Washington surprised her listeners by attacking television's No. 1 program: "The Cosby Show."
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | Cheryl Wittenauer, Associated Press Writer
When Denise Brock sat with her cancer-stricken dad in the 1960s, she made lots of racket, hoping that the noise would prevent his dying on her watch. Today, Brock, 43, is clamoring all the louder, a full-time activist on behalf of aging Cold War-era nuclear workers and their survivors. "I'm obsessed with this," she said. "If I don't help them, who's going to?" A 3-year-old federal law requires the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Atomic Cats of the San Onofre nuclear power plant, Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Neutron, are going home today. More than two years after the litter of black cats was born with radiation contamination at the plant, they are going to live with two plant employees. The kittens were found near a defunct nuclear unit in January 1996. When their mother could not be found, employees tried to carry them off the grounds, triggering the plant's nuclear-contamination-detecting alarms.
WORLD
July 18, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legal recognition of same-sex marriages presents no threat to heterosexual couples, Germany's Constitutional Court ruled Wednesday in a blow to conservatives who have waged a campaign for traditional family values in this emotionally charged election season. Conservatives in the three states that challenged the year-old gay marriage law conceded defeat but continued to loudly lament what they see as deterioration of official support for the nuclear family. Bavarian Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mary Palevsky, ground zero wasn't a remote test site in far off New Mexico but the living room of her Long Island home. It was there as a 9-year-old, confronted by photographs of the first atomic blast, that she began asking her parents what they did during the war. She was troubled by the answers--answers that led to a book and now a major Japanese documentary. For the past month, a camera crew from the nationally-owned Japan Broadcasting Corp.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
This little town in the red-rock bluffs of southern Utah ought to be predictable. Nearly 97% of the 3,500 residents are white. About 80% voted for President Bush in the last election. Many families trace their roots back five generations, to the Mormon pioneers who laid out the town in the 1870s with wide streets, a prudent irrigation system -- and, as a historical account noted, "not a grog shop or gambling saloon or dance hall" to be found.
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