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Nuclear Fuel Processing Plants

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NEWS
July 9, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to American threats and United Nations pressure, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has revealed reluctantly that Iraq has the equipment needed to enrich uranium so it can be used in a nuclear bomb, officials said Monday. A distrustful Bush Administration received the news warily, making clear that there would be no gloating until U.N. inspectors are shown all the equipment so it can be destroyed in accordance with the Security Council resolution that ended the Persian Gulf War.
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WORLD
February 4, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The squat, tan buildings with barred windows can be reached only by driving well outside the city to a flat stretch of desert on the edge of the hills. The site is surrounded by an array of antiaircraft artillery emplacements, each with one or two soldiers at the ready, and a large metal fence topped with barbed wire. Once inside the reception hall, visitors are greeted by a huge poster that reads, "Nuclear Energy Is Our Obvious Right."
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NEWS
November 12, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
In the wake of World War II, Edward Teller, often called the "Father of the H-Bomb," presided over the development of sophisticated nuclear weapons that helped establish one of the enduring dogmas of the nuclear age--that atomic weapons are a cheap way to wage war and keep the peace.
WORLD
August 27, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Iran announced Saturday it had reached another milestone in its nuclear program, appearing eager to create an air of inevitability to its acquisition of atomic technology in the face of a U.N. deadline this week to temporarily halt its uranium enrichment operations. In choosing to inaugurate a heavy-water production plant just days before the threat of censure from world powers, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad signaled that the Islamic Republic would not be cowed.
NEWS
October 19, 1988
Ohio Gov. Richard F. Celeste said that he demanded in a letter that President Reagan shut down a government-owned uranium processing plant until something is done to stop the radioactive pollution it produces. The Energy Department admitted Friday at a congressional committee hearing in Washington that the government has known of dangerous environmental problems at the Feed Materials Production Center since it was established in 1951, Celeste said.
NEWS
October 9, 1988
Production of material for nuclear weapons will not be resumed until longtime safety problems are corrected in the troubled reactors at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, S.C. Officials first said a Nov. 1 target date had been set for restarting one reactor, but others said that was in error and no timetable has been set.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The Energy Department has decided after a lengthy review to recommend restarting a troubled South Carolina nuclear reactor in July, 1990, so it can resume production of tritium, a vital component of nuclear weapons, government sources said Wednesday. The new timetable means that operation of the tritium-producing reactor at Savannah River will be delayed at least six months beyond the target previously set by the department. But Energy Secretary James D.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | From United Press International
A January accident at a nuclear weapons reactor in South Carolina may have resulted in significantly more damage than engineers initially believed, a newspaper reported today. An Energy Department investigation of the Jan. 22 accident at the Savannah River plant, during which pressurized water in a reactor cooling system shook pipes and caused some valves to break, found that two 95-ton heat exchangers may have been ruined, the New York Times reported, quoting government engineers.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Even if there were no crisis at the nation's nuclear weapons factories, the choice of Navy Adm. James D. Watkins--a military man with nuclear experience--to head the Energy Department squares with the transformation of the agency under President Reagan into a mostly military one. Created as a cabinet agency by President Jimmy Carter in 1977, the department had among its bureaucratic predecessors the Atomic Energy Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1989 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of nuclear projects at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory on Thursday night implored federal officials to deny the aerospace firm's request for renewal of its radioactive materials license and called on Rockwell "to clean up and clear out" the nuclear part of its business.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Bush Administration official told Congress on Thursday that North Korea may be only months away from finishing a plant that can reprocess nuclear fuel, a step that would enable it to build a nuclear bomb by mid-1993. A North Korean nuclear reprocessing plant "may be nearing operational status," Undersecretary of State Arnold Kanter told a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on Asia. On Jan.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to American threats and United Nations pressure, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has revealed reluctantly that Iraq has the equipment needed to enrich uranium so it can be used in a nuclear bomb, officials said Monday. A distrustful Bush Administration received the news warily, making clear that there would be no gloating until U.N. inspectors are shown all the equipment so it can be destroyed in accordance with the Security Council resolution that ended the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An explosion and fire at a nuclear fuel production plant in the Soviet Far East injured several people and threatened to contaminate the region's air and water, the official Tass news agency said. The blast in Kazakhstan sent gas clouds over a region near the Soviet borders with Mongolia and China. Tass said an explosion ripped through the Ulba plant's cellar workshop producing beryllium, a highly toxic heavy metal used to fuel nuclear reactors.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Contempt of court charges were filed against the U.S. Department of Energy and the operator of the Fernald, Ohio, uranium processing plant for allegedly violating a cleanup agreement. State Atty. Gen. Anthony J. Celebrezze Jr. accused the federal government and Westinghouse Materials Co. of mishandling hazardous waste containers, failing to properly analyze some 40,000 drums of radioactive material and failing to develop a written inspection schedule.
NEWS
October 1, 1989
A federal judge has approved the Energy Department's $78-million settlement offer in a class-action suit filed on behalf of 14,000 people who live near the government's Fernald uranium plant in Ohio. U.S. District Judge S. Arthur Spiegel ruled in Cincinnati that the offer made by the Energy Department, which owns the Feed Materials Processing Center, was fair and reasonable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1989
A federal administrative judge Friday granted intervenor status to three opponents of Rockwell International's request to renew its nuclear materials license for the "hot lab" at its Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth. Peter Bloch, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission judge, ruled that Jerome Raskin and Estelle Lit of Northridge and Jon Scott of Bell Canyon in eastern Ventura County can be parties in the case and submit formal evidence in opposition to the license request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1989 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of nuclear projects at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory on Thursday night implored federal officials to deny the aerospace firm's request for renewal of its radioactive materials license and called on Rockwell "to clean up and clear out" the nuclear part of its business.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The Energy Department has decided after a lengthy review to recommend restarting a troubled South Carolina nuclear reactor in July, 1990, so it can resume production of tritium, a vital component of nuclear weapons, government sources said Wednesday. The new timetable means that operation of the tritium-producing reactor at Savannah River will be delayed at least six months beyond the target previously set by the department. But Energy Secretary James D.
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