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Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty

OPINION
June 21, 2003
Re "Shakier Fingers on the Nuclear Buttons," Commentary, June 15: Rajan Menon omits the most significant fact about the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. The nuclear countries, those with the bomb, agreed to eliminate their nuclear weapons as soon as possible. That was 35 years ago. Today, the United States not only has no plans to eliminate its nuclear weapons, it is even planning new types of nuclear weapons. The nonproliferation treaty is dead because it was killed by the U.S. and the other permanent members of the Security Council that refuse to take treaty obligations seriously.
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OPINION
March 20, 2002
Re "New Nuclear Policy Makes for a Safer World," Commentary, March 18: Barry Blechman clearly lives in Fantasyland. Resuming nuclear testing, threatening to use nuclear bombs and breaking treaties make the world safer? Nuclear bombs could destroy the Earth, and any nuclear bomb, even so-called "low yield," emits deadly radiation. Our new policy can only lead to other nations building up their nuclear arsenals, thus sabotaging the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2001
Re "Bush Team Sees U.S. Withdrawal From ABM Pact," July 12: Far from outliving its usefulness, the ABM treaty helped slow U.S.-Russian nuclear madness, end the Cold War and lay groundwork for the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, signed but not yet ratified by the U.S. and just a few other nations. Until the NPT is ratified, the ABM treaty is still critically needed. Since our administration believes faith-based agencies can best use government funds to improve social services for our nation's needy, why not entrust them with the billions targeted for missile defense to help them take the offensive in serving our world's needy?
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The five nuclear powers on the Security Council agreed Saturday to eliminate their nuclear arsenals as part of a disarmament agenda agreed to by 187 countries. The agreement by the signatories to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, or NPT, was reached after all-night deliberations and intense pressure on Iraq and the United States to settle a dispute over Baghdad's compliance with U.N. sanctions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2000
Robert Scheer is correct in stating that the United States has zero credibility in urging other nations not to develop and deploy nuclear weapons ("Do As We Say, Not As We Do," Commentary, March 28). Scheer, however, fails to explain why India and Pakistan refused to sign the nuclear test ban treaty. He implies that the reason is that the U.S. Senate failed to ratify the treaty last year. When the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty was first proposed, Egypt threatened to refuse to sign the agreement unless Israel did. The U.S. government threatened to cancel foreign aid unless Egypt signed on. Egypt capitulated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1997
"Box-Office Bomb," in the April 2 Washington Insight column, notes the impending retirement of the nine-megaton, 8,850-pound B53 nuclear bomb, described as the weapon "ridden bronco-style to nuclear Armageddon" by Slim Pickens in the classic 1964 film "Dr. Strangelove." Before celebrating the passing of the approximately 50 remaining versions of this thermonuclear behemoth, you should have noted that it is being replaced (in roughly equal numbers) by the B61-11, a newly reconfigured nuclear gravity bomb designed to burrow underground some 50 feet before detonating.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore warned bluntly Wednesday that failure to make permanent a 25-year-old treaty banning the spread of nuclear weapons could trigger regional arms races that could be even more dangerous than the atomic standoff of the Cold War.
OPINION
May 9, 1993 | Robert A. Manning, Robert A. Manning, a policy adviser in the State Department for East Asian and Pacific affairs from 1989-March, 1993, is a research associate at the Sigur Center of George Washington University's School of International Relations
Don't look now, but just as Bill Clinton is coming to grips with the Bosnia crisis, he may be sideswiped by another international fiasco of similar magnitude. For if creative diplomacy doesn't find a way out of the North Korean nuclear crisis, a global version of the Waco, Tex., standoff may be looming in the form of a confrontation with another self-isolated, heavily armed and similarly suicidal cult--the Pyongyang regime. This time, nuclear weapons may start the fire.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | From Reuters
China formally acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty on Monday and pledged to help prevent the spread of atomic weapons and to work for nuclear disarmament. Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen handed the articles of accession to British Prime Minister John Major and called the move a "major step in a process toward complete prohibition and thorough destruction of nuclear weapons."
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African government, saying it is seeking to take its "rightful place in the world community," announced plans Thursday to sign the international nuclear non-proliferation treaty, ending years of suspicion about its weapons capability. The pledge to open its nuclear facilities to inspection and not to divert nuclear material for weapons "will allay any fears South Africa will ever use such devices," Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha told a news conference in Pretoria.
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