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Nuclear Power Plant Accidents

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NEWS
January 16, 1993 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as this week's two apparently harmless fires at the Chernobyl nuclear plant rekindled popular fears in Ukraine, Turkey has been reliving its own nightmare of those fearful days of radioactive clouds and rain. But whereas Ukrainians have lived for years with the impact of the April, 1986, disaster--8,000 people are thought to have died as a result--the Turks 700 miles to the south had always been told that they had little to worry about.
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WORLD
September 6, 2005 | Charles Piller and Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writers
Nearly two decades after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster spread radioactive fallout across much of Europe, a United Nations study has concluded that the health effects have been far smaller than feared. The researchers confirmed 56 deaths -- nine children from thyroid cancer and 47 emergency workers from acute radiation poisoning or radiation-induced cancer. They projected that 3,940 more people would eventually die of cancer, according to the report released Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1986
My God! Of the 16 nuclear power plant accidents reported in The Times chronology (April 30), 12 occurred in the United States . . . . Do we really know what is happening around us? DICK HENKE San Pedro
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators are looking into potential flaws at the San Onofre nuclear power station and 67 other atomic plants across the nation that could cripple or knock out a reactor's emergency core cooling system during an accident. The defect has prompted the Union of Concerned Scientists to warn that the San Onofre station near San Clemente is among the most likely to suffer reactor damage and possible meltdowns because of the defect.
NEWS
April 19, 1987
The International Atomic Energy Agency has received more than 250 "hushed-up reports" of nuclear power plant accidents, including several in the United States, the West German magazine Der Spiegel reported. However, details on at least four of the U.S. accidents are public, and a spokesman for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said no nuclear mishaps have been kept secret.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | Associated Press
The Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, a large federal complex that produces fuel for the nation's nuclear weapons, has experienced numerous reactor accidents that have been kept secret for as long as 31 years, two congressional committees disclosed Friday.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials, disclosing new details about a series of nuclear disasters in the Ural Mountains, have admitted that 450,000 people were contaminated by radiation from the giant Mayak atomic plant between 1948 and 1967, and that the site remains a potential hazard.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On that Saturday morning in 1962, the men whose bodies formed the radiological front lines of the Cold War knew what it meant to see the eerie blue flash known as Cerenkov radiation. "He saw the blue flash two times, and he knew that nobody had ever lived after seeing the blue flash. So in his mind he knew he was dead. He told me that," said Dorothy Aardal of her husband, Harold.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks following the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station six years ago, the Soviet leadership told lie upon lie to cover up the scope of the disaster and hide the danger it posed to the country's population, according to secret Communist Party documents published Friday by the newspaper Izvestia.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
Two reactors were shut off Friday at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant because a "mistake by personnel" caused a problem in their water-cooling system, the state news agency Tass reported. "This is purely a technical stop, which poses no danger for people and the natural environment," shift supervisor N. Fedoseyev was quoted as saying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators on Monday gave the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and its neighboring communities high marks in being prepared for a nuclear disaster. "Generally, we're happy with their performance," said Tom Ridgeway, branch chief for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which oversees emergency preparedness. "They have demonstrated that they . . . have plans in place and the ability to protect the public."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the mood was serious and the faces solemn, a message board scrolled out the real story in red letters: "This is a drill." Public officials, nuclear experts and media representatives gathered Wednesday for Southern California Edison's testing and grading of emergency preparedness at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station near San Clemente, the last such exercise this century.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | Associated Press
A gust from an air lock knocked down a group of workers at the Seabrook nuclear plant, slightly injuring 11, authorities said. The accident Sunday afternoon occurred when hydraulically operated doors were being opened after the plant was shut down for refueling. An air lock is an airtight compartment between places that do not have the same air pressure. Two workers were treated at a hospital for minor injuries, and nine others received cuts and bruises, a spokesman said.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials, disclosing new details about a series of nuclear disasters in the Ural Mountains, have admitted that 450,000 people were contaminated by radiation from the giant Mayak atomic plant between 1948 and 1967, and that the site remains a potential hazard.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as this week's two apparently harmless fires at the Chernobyl nuclear plant rekindled popular fears in Ukraine, Turkey has been reliving its own nightmare of those fearful days of radioactive clouds and rain. But whereas Ukrainians have lived for years with the impact of the April, 1986, disaster--8,000 people are thought to have died as a result--the Turks 700 miles to the south had always been told that they had little to worry about.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks following the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station six years ago, the Soviet leadership told lie upon lie to cover up the scope of the disaster and hide the danger it posed to the country's population, according to secret Communist Party documents published Friday by the newspaper Izvestia.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | Associated Press
A Soviet official said Friday that those responsible for the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster will go on trial soon. Andronik M. Petrosyants, chairman of the State Committee for the Utilization of Atomic Energy, told a news conference that he does not know how many people are being prosecuted, what the charges are or exactly when the proceedings will begin. "All I can say is that it will be soon and it will be in Kiev," he said.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last year, when Lithuania led the Baltic charge for independence from the Soviet Union, Moscow cut off its outside source of electricity, leaving the rebellious republic solely dependent upon two Chernobyl-type nuclear power reactors. The thought of what could have happened is chilling even now. Without electricity from Russia, there was no backup power to operate emergency equipment at the aging facility.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | Associated Press
An explosion at the Susquehanna Nuclear Plant injured two workers early Saturday, contaminating one man with radioactive dust, officials said. No radiation was released into the atmosphere, and the plant continued operating, said Jim Marsh, spokesman for the plant's owner, Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. "No danger to the public exists," Marsh said of the 9 a.m. accident, which was termed an "unusual event," the lowest level of nuclear emergency.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fire broke out in an electrical generator of the Soviet nuclear plant at Chernobyl but it was quickly put out and there were no casualties, officials at the power station 80 miles north of Kiev said. "The fire has been put out . . . There are no casualties," said a recorded telephone message at the plant, scene of the world's worst nuclear reactor accident in 1986. Three other reactors at Chernobyl continued operating after the disaster, although some were shut down temporarily.
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