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Nuclear Power Plants Security

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NEWS
March 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Security at the nation's nuclear power plants is under review to see if new safeguards are needed against the possibility of terrorist truck-bomb attacks, the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Friday. Chairman Ivan Selin said the installation of reinforced steel gates and concrete barricades, which the commission has rejected in the past, is being reconsidered in light of two recent events.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Since last month's terrorist attacks, officials at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and surrounding cities have had serious second thoughts about holding the plant's annual siren tests, worried that they might panic an already jittery public. Yet because of concerns about other possible terrorist strikes in the United States, authorities concluded that there has never been a more crucial time to make sure the warning system is in top working condition.
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NEWS
November 28, 1988
A congressional panel has expanded its investigation of security and personnel problems to include the Los Alamos nuclear weapons laboratory after a senior computer operator there was arrested on marijuana charges, an aide to Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) said. Jeffrey Hodges said as part of the investigation, Dingell, chairman of the Energy and Commerce subcommittee on oversight and investigations, has asked for the cooperation of Energy Secretary John S.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The federal government has eliminated its only program for testing the ability of commercial nuclear power plants to repel armed terrorists--part of a cost-cutting reorganization of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Established in 1991, when the aftermath of the Gulf War heightened fears about terrorist attacks, the program, while small, had identified serious security lapses at nearly half the nation's 104 nuclear power reactors.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Nuclear power plants must install barriers to guard against vehicle bombs like the one that exploded under the World Trade Center, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has ruled. The NRC had refused for years to require the anti-terrorist barriers at nuclear plants, but commissioners reconsidered because of the New York City bombing and another bizarre incident, which both happened in February, 1993.
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Tuesday fined Northeast Utilities $25,000 for security violations at the Millstone nuclear power station. Inspectors said that, among other things, they had found two visitors without proper clearance wandering around the facility without escort. The company said it would pay the fine.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hundred feet farther and Pennsylvania might still be glowing. At the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant last year, a discharged mental patient barreled his station wagon into a turbine building, stopping just 200 feet short of ramming a vital area of the facility and possibly triggering a deadly release of radiation. Security was so light that he was able to race past a guard post, break through a chain-link fence and crash through the building's steel door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Since last month's terrorist attacks, officials at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and surrounding cities have had serious second thoughts about holding the plant's annual siren tests, worried that they might panic an already jittery public. Yet because of concerns about other possible terrorist strikes in the United States, authorities concluded that there has never been a more crucial time to make sure the warning system is in top working condition.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lithuania's president said Tuesday that measures announced by Moscow to reassert control over the breakaway Baltic state show that negotiations with the Kremlin are still possible and that there is no danger of an economic blockade. Despite such conciliatory words, Vytautas Landsbergis revealed that he has stepped up security at the republic's lone nuclear power plant to prevent any acts by "madmen."
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The federal government has eliminated its only program for testing the ability of commercial nuclear power plants to repel armed terrorists--part of a cost-cutting reorganization of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Established in 1991, when the aftermath of the Gulf War heightened fears about terrorist attacks, the program, while small, had identified serious security lapses at nearly half the nation's 104 nuclear power reactors.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Nuclear power plants must install barriers to guard against vehicle bombs like the one that exploded under the World Trade Center, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has ruled. The NRC had refused for years to require the anti-terrorist barriers at nuclear plants, but commissioners reconsidered because of the New York City bombing and another bizarre incident, which both happened in February, 1993.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hundred feet farther and Pennsylvania might still be glowing. At the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant last year, a discharged mental patient barreled his station wagon into a turbine building, stopping just 200 feet short of ramming a vital area of the facility and possibly triggering a deadly release of radiation. Security was so light that he was able to race past a guard post, break through a chain-link fence and crash through the building's steel door.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | From Associated Press
Security at the nation's nuclear power plants is under review to see if new safeguards are needed against the possibility of terrorist truck-bomb attacks, the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Friday. Chairman Ivan Selin said the installation of reinforced steel gates and concrete barricades, which the commission has rejected in the past, is being reconsidered in light of two recent events.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lithuania's president said Tuesday that measures announced by Moscow to reassert control over the breakaway Baltic state show that negotiations with the Kremlin are still possible and that there is no danger of an economic blockade. Despite such conciliatory words, Vytautas Landsbergis revealed that he has stepped up security at the republic's lone nuclear power plant to prevent any acts by "madmen."
NEWS
November 28, 1988
A congressional panel has expanded its investigation of security and personnel problems to include the Los Alamos nuclear weapons laboratory after a senior computer operator there was arrested on marijuana charges, an aide to Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) said. Jeffrey Hodges said as part of the investigation, Dingell, chairman of the Energy and Commerce subcommittee on oversight and investigations, has asked for the cooperation of Energy Secretary John S.
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Tuesday fined Northeast Utilities $25,000 for security violations at the Millstone nuclear power station. Inspectors said that, among other things, they had found two visitors without proper clearance wandering around the facility without escort. The company said it would pay the fine.
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