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Nuclear Safety

NEWS
August 9, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate voted Monday to abolish the five-member Nuclear Regulatory Commission and create a new Nuclear Safety Agency with a single administrator to make regulation of commercial atomic power plants more effective.
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NEWS
March 26, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western nuclear safety experts are concentrating on programs to improve the operating procedures, training and management techniques that they hope will prevent or at least delay catastrophic accidents at the dangerously antiquated atomic power stations stretched across Eastern Europe in the wreckage of communism. But progress has been painfully slow, and U.S.
NEWS
December 30, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kunio Murai was a struggling farmer from the wrong side of the tracks when he was recruited to work as a day laborer in a nuclear power plant near this farm town. The pay was triple what he could make anywhere else, and he was told that the work would be janitorial. One day in 1970, he and a co-worker were ordered into a room to mop up a leak of radioactive cooling water. They wore ordinary rubber gloves, but no masks or additional protection.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Five months after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, it is still not clear whether the steps the Soviet Union has taken to prevent a similar reactor explosion are sufficient, according to a report made public Wednesday by the International Atomic Energy Agency.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Three more fatal accidents have occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear plant this year, and radiation continues to be a problem there, according to a report Friday by a Communist Party official. The surprising report was made by an official identified only as V. Lukyanenko, head of the party in the new town of Slavutich.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite concerns about the nuclear arms programs launched by Iraq and other countries, the Bush Administration is quietly seeking to head off efforts in Congress to clamp down on U.S. exports of products or technology that can be used in manufacturing such weapons. In a letter to Congress last week, the Administration declared that it opposes legislation that would strengthen the existing system of U.S. export controls for nuclear-related technology.
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, making his first visit to the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, on Thursday urged the utmost caution in developing atomic energy and the strictest safeguards to prevent future accidents. "All power stations must be kept in such a state (of security) that nothing of this kind can happen again," Gorbachev declared as he toured the Chernobyl nuclear power station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Alan Zarembo and Ben Welsh
The U.S. nuclear industry is turning up the power on old reactors, spurring quiet debate over the safety of pushing aging equipment beyond its original specifications. The little-publicized practice, known as uprating, has expanded the country's nuclear capacity without the financial risks, public anxiety and political obstacles that have halted the construction of new plants for the last 15 years. The power boosts come from more potent fuel rods in the reactor core and, sometimes, more highly enriched uranium.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two vital components of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex will resume operating before the end of this year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress Wednesday. The projected timetable, which Watkins admitted is "ambitious," aroused skepticism from some members of the House Armed Services defense nuclear subcommittee, who also expressed concern that the expedited schedule might give short shrift to safety concerns.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station, the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, will be phased out of operation over the next five years and then permanently closed under a decision announced Friday by authorities in the Ukraine, one of the Soviet Union's constituent republics.
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