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Nuclear Safety

WORLD
September 12, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
At least one person was killed and four injured when a furnace exploded Monday at the Marcoule nuclear waste treatment site in southern France. Authorites say there was no radioactive leakage to the outside. Evangelia Petit of the Agency for Nuclear Safety confirmed the explosion but declined to provide further details, according to the Associated Press. The Marcoule nuclear plant is located in Langedoc Roussillon, in southern France, near the Mediterranean Sea. The site of the blast does not reportedly contain any nuclear reactors.
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NEWS
August 1, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned over the potential for chemical explosions in tanks of liquid nuclear waste, scientists have laid plans to take crucial samples from a million-gallon container of radioactive brew buried at the Hanford, Wash., nuclear weapons complex. The operation comes in the wake of new warnings that the buildup of gas in steel waste tanks could cause explosions powerful enough to rupture them and cause disastrous releases of high-level radioactivity.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The nation's nuclear power plants reported nearly 3,000 mishaps and at least 430 emergency shutdowns in 1987, according to a report issued Thursday by Public Citizen's Critical Mass Energy Project. Federal and nuclear industry officials said the numbers simply reflect the effectiveness of safety monitoring.
NEWS
September 26, 1986 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Soviet authorities have agreed to supply the United States with technical data on the safety of two nuclear reactors that Cuba is building with Soviet help, U.S. Secretary of Energy John S. Herrington said Thursday. Herrington said he met for an hour Thursday morning with Soviet Deputy Premier Boris Y.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Associated Press
Two government committees have criticized plans to resume operations in a laboratory at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant, saying workers could be exposed to plutonium contamination. The laboratory, known as Building 559, was to have been the model for restarting plutonium operations at the rest of the plant 15 miles northwest of Denver. The lab analyzes radioactive and hazardous waste for disposal, and performs quality control tests on plutonium samples from bomb production lines.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate voted Monday to abolish the five-member Nuclear Regulatory Commission and create a new Nuclear Safety Agency with a single administrator to make regulation of commercial atomic power plants more effective.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western nuclear safety experts are concentrating on programs to improve the operating procedures, training and management techniques that they hope will prevent or at least delay catastrophic accidents at the dangerously antiquated atomic power stations stretched across Eastern Europe in the wreckage of communism. But progress has been painfully slow, and U.S.
NEWS
December 30, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kunio Murai was a struggling farmer from the wrong side of the tracks when he was recruited to work as a day laborer in a nuclear power plant near this farm town. The pay was triple what he could make anywhere else, and he was told that the work would be janitorial. One day in 1970, he and a co-worker were ordered into a room to mop up a leak of radioactive cooling water. They wore ordinary rubber gloves, but no masks or additional protection.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Five months after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, it is still not clear whether the steps the Soviet Union has taken to prevent a similar reactor explosion are sufficient, according to a report made public Wednesday by the International Atomic Energy Agency.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Three more fatal accidents have occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear plant this year, and radiation continues to be a problem there, according to a report Friday by a Communist Party official. The surprising report was made by an official identified only as V. Lukyanenko, head of the party in the new town of Slavutich.
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