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Nuclear Stockpile

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NATIONAL
October 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The U.S. is dismantling unneeded nuclear warheads at a faster pace than forecast as it substantially reduces the arsenal under terms of an arms-control treaty with Russia, government officials said Sunday. The Bush administration is to announce today that it has taken apart three times as many reserve warheads in the 2007 budget year as it had projected, and that it expects the rapid pace of dismantlement to continue.
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WORLD
December 1, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, his confident bluntness on full display, has declared Russia might build up its nuclear weapons instead of reducing them if the New START treaty arranged with the Obama administration is not ratified by Congress. If the treaty is held up by U.S. legislators showing "a very dumb nature" then Russia will "have to react somehow," Putin said in an interview with CNN's Larry King scheduled for broadcast Wednesday. Putin said the treaty, which calls for reducing the maximum nuclear warheads in each country from 2,200 to 1,550, is in the best interest of the United States.
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NEWS
September 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A fourth experiment to determine the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile has been conducted at the Nevada Test Site, drawing criticism from Japanese leaders. The experiment conducted Saturday in horizontal tunnels about 960 feet underground remained subcritical, meaning no self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction occurred, said Robin Staffin, deputy assistant Energy secretary for research and development.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
Even as it touts U.S. efforts to sharply reduce its number of nuclear warheads, the Obama administration plans to increase spending on the aging nuclear weapons infrastructure to levels reminiscent of the Cold War, a new budget document shows. A 20-year spending plan from the agency that manages the nuclear arsenal shows that the administration wants to hike nuclear weapons spending to an average of more than $8 billion a year, compared with recent spending levels of $6 billion to $7 billion a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987
Thousands of World War II Hitler collaborators and their descendants will be rejoicing because only one has been chosen to be deported. These so-called "displaced persons" and "freedom fighters" have one more reason to be laughing. They have succeeded far beyond their numbers in transforming our wartime alliance with he Soviet Union into a state of explosive hatred. Our nuclear stockpile gives them hope that the day will come when Hitler's defeat on the Eastern front can be avenged.
OPINION
January 17, 2002
Our president has now reneged on his promise to Russian President Vladimir Putin to dismantle thousands of nuclear weapons as part of our unilateral withdrawal from the ABM treaty (Jan. 13). I recall that President Bush was asked how we could trust the Russians to diminish their own nuclear stockpile as their part of this deal. He stated that no formal agreement was needed and that he could trust Putin after "looking the man in the eye." Unfortunately, Putin appears to be a poor judge of character to have trusted Bush to deliver on his promise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987
Can someone tell me why the Administration has chosen to thumb its nose at current efforts toward arms control by violating the SALT II treaty in launching that more-than-is-allowed B-52 bomber equipped to carry nuclear weapons? Considering that: 1--Our nuclear stockpile already has an overkill capacity, being able to destroy the world a dozen times over. 2--All sane people know that to launch a heavy nuclear weapon, either as a first strike or in retaliation, will ultimately resuit in suicide for ourselves and the planet as a whole.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
Even as it touts U.S. efforts to sharply reduce its number of nuclear warheads, the Obama administration plans to increase spending on the aging nuclear weapons infrastructure to levels reminiscent of the Cold War, a new budget document shows. A 20-year spending plan from the agency that manages the nuclear arsenal shows that the administration wants to hike nuclear weapons spending to an average of more than $8 billion a year, compared with recent spending levels of $6 billion to $7 billion a year.
OPINION
March 7, 2007
Re "Livermore is picked to build new H-bomb," March 3 While the U.S. Department of Energy announces the push for new weapons to replace old ones, the Bush administration tries to claim nonproliferation moral authority around the world. This program completely undermines U.S. foreign policy and catapults the nation's nuclear policy in the wrong direction. What we truly need is renewed leadership in eliminating nuclear weapons altogether. If the U.S. is serious about nonproliferation, it must send a clear message that eliminating all nuclear weapons is the only solution.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | LESLIE HELM and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Energy Department announced Thursday that it will work with Intel Corp. to develop a powerful new computer that will help make it possible to assure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpiles without setting off underground nuclear explosions.
WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By Paul Richter and Christi Parsons
Reporting from Washington and Prague, Czech Republic -- President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed a treaty Thursday to shrink their nuclear arsenals, hoping to open an era of improved relations between the former superpower foes while launching an arms-control agenda extending far into the future. The two leaders met in the gilded majesty of a medieval castle in Prague, once a city at the epicenter of Cold War tension, and formally agreed to bring their nations' arsenals to their lowest levels since half a century ago, the days of the Cuban missile crisis, which brought the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of nuclear war. But the signing of the pact in the Czech capital also pointed to challenges confronting Obama as he offers a plan to control the world's nuclear arms and address future international security threats.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2007 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration said Tuesday that it would make a 15% reduction in the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons, taking the overall inventory down to less than a quarter of its size at the end of the Cold War in 1991. A major effort to retire older weapons was accomplished five years ahead of schedule, allowing the new round of cutbacks, said Thomas P. D'Agostino, chief of the National Nuclear Security Administration. The additional cuts would be done by 2012.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The U.S. is dismantling unneeded nuclear warheads at a faster pace than forecast as it substantially reduces the arsenal under terms of an arms-control treaty with Russia, government officials said Sunday. The Bush administration is to announce today that it has taken apart three times as many reserve warheads in the 2007 budget year as it had projected, and that it expects the rapid pace of dismantlement to continue.
OPINION
March 7, 2007
Re "Livermore is picked to build new H-bomb," March 3 While the U.S. Department of Energy announces the push for new weapons to replace old ones, the Bush administration tries to claim nonproliferation moral authority around the world. This program completely undermines U.S. foreign policy and catapults the nation's nuclear policy in the wrong direction. What we truly need is renewed leadership in eliminating nuclear weapons altogether. If the U.S. is serious about nonproliferation, it must send a clear message that eliminating all nuclear weapons is the only solution.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2005 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Some of the nation's senior nuclear weapons experts are warning that a move in the Senate to kill construction funding for a massive laser complex at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will erode confidence in the nation's nuclear weapons. The Senate is expected this week to approve an appropriations bill that would delete $146 million for further construction of the laser, known as the National Ignition Facility. The $3.
OPINION
February 12, 2004
In June 1963, John F. Kennedy famously declared that the United States would end above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and called for negotiations on a more comprehensive global test ban. "It would place the nuclear powers in a position to deal more effectively with one of the greatest hazards which man faces in 1963, the further spread of nuclear arms," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1987
The angry letters (May 26) denouncing Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger's call for continued nuclear testing, betrayed a lack of information about U.S. strategic programs and the reasons testing is essential for our security. We all hope for a world free of nuclear weapons, but until we can forgo our dependence on nuclear deterrence to maintain security and stability we must rely on nuclear weapons to keep the peace. Other nations as well rely on our nuclear deterrent. Our adversaries are deterred by it. All must have confidence in it. Deterrence has, after all, successfully kept the world free of global war for more than 40 years.
OPINION
February 12, 2004
In June 1963, John F. Kennedy famously declared that the United States would end above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and called for negotiations on a more comprehensive global test ban. "It would place the nuclear powers in a position to deal more effectively with one of the greatest hazards which man faces in 1963, the further spread of nuclear arms," he said.
OPINION
May 22, 2002
Re "Bush and Putin Must Confront Nuclear Terror," Commentary, May 20: The recommendations by professors Graham Allison and Andrei Kokoshin may very well be the most important commentary ever published in The Times. All Americans must hope and demand that our leadership recognizes the overriding importance of securing the American and Russian nuclear stockpiles. God help us all if we don't. Lewis K. Waldman La Jolla
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration is speeding efforts to safeguard Cold War-era nuclear stockpiles before terrorists can get hold of them, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham said Friday. Addressing the Los Angeles World Affairs Council in Beverly Hills, Abraham outlined a series of measures aimed primarily at securing the former Soviet Union's vast stockpiles of weapon-grade radioactive materials. "We are facing a situation we think is, frankly, more harrowing than it was a decade ago. . . .
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