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Nuclear Tests Nevada

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July 3, 1997 | Reuters
The United States began a round of controversial underground nuclear weapons-related tests Wednesday in the Nevada desert, an Energy Department spokeswoman said. The experiments, announced earlier, were designed to test weapons materials without triggering the kind of nuclear chain reaction prohibited by an international treaty signed last year.
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NEWS
July 3, 1997 | Reuters
The United States began a round of controversial underground nuclear weapons-related tests Wednesday in the Nevada desert, an Energy Department spokeswoman said. The experiments, announced earlier, were designed to test weapons materials without triggering the kind of nuclear chain reaction prohibited by an international treaty signed last year.
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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four protesters delayed but failed to halt the test of a British nuclear weapon Wednesday by infiltrating the remote Nevada Test Site and making their way to ground zero. The device, with an explosive force about 12 times that of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, was detonated at 11:17 a.m., more than two hours behind schedule after the four were removed by security officers, Department of Energy authorities said.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | ROBERT MACY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During the Gulf War, one of the most perplexing problems facing U.S. military strategists was how to penetrate hardened Iraqi facilities buried deep underground. They found their answer at the Tonopah Test Range, a facility north of the Nevada Test Site, where high-tech weapons are paired with delivery vehicles ranging from supersonic jets to missiles.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | ROBERT MACY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During the Gulf War, one of the most perplexing problems facing U.S. military strategists was how to penetrate hardened Iraqi facilities buried deep underground. They found their answer at the Tonopah Test Range, a facility north of the Nevada Test Site, where high-tech weapons are paired with delivery vehicles ranging from supersonic jets to missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1986
The nuclear tests in Nevada are an outrage. They serve no useful purpose whatsoever except to jack up our President's fantasies of obliterating the Commies. They are detrimental to the environment. They engender hostility. The argument that we have to set off nuclear bombs is rather specious in face of the fact that the Soviets have halted testing, and I haven't heard any other argument or excuse for this unconscious behavior emanating from the White House. I can only conclude that our country has fallen into the hands of fascists whose primary concern is military superiority.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | From United Press International
The Soviet Union conducted an underground nuclear test Wednesday in Central Asia, and France, drawing harsh criticism from Prime Minister David Lange of New Zealand, set off a nuclear device in the South Pacific. The Soviet blast at a military testing site in Soviet Central Asia was its seventh nuclear explosion since the Kremlin ended a unilateral moratorium in February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1995 | ROBERT MACY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A cold wind whips across the snow-covered desert and through a desolate 15-story tower covering ground zero for America's next underground nuclear weapons test--if that day ever comes. The name of the planned test, "Icecap," seems appropriate given the frigid January weather at this remote weapons research outpost that is larger than the state of Rhode Island. Scientists who have crafted the nation's nuclear arsenal over the past half century say continued underground testing is necessary to monitor the safety and reliability of an aging weapons stockpile.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four protesters delayed but failed to halt the test of a British nuclear weapon Wednesday by infiltrating the remote Nevada Test Site and making their way to ground zero. The device, with an explosive force about 12 times that of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, was detonated at 11:17 a.m., more than two hours behind schedule after the four were removed by security officers, Department of Energy authorities said.
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